Pollution and Marine Debris

Estimation of tsunami debris on seafloors towards future disaster preparedness: Unveiling spatial varying effects of combined land use and oceanographic factors

Matsuba M, Tanaka Y, Yamakita T, Ishikawa Y, Fujikura K. Estimation of tsunami debris on seafloors towards future disaster preparedness: Unveiling spatial varying effects of combined land use and oceanographic factors. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2020 ;157:111289. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X20304070
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A large amount of tsunami debris from the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011 was sunk on the seafloor and threatened the marine ecosystem and local communities' economy, especially in fisheries. However, few studies estimated spatial accumulations of tsunami benthic debris, comparing to their flows on the ocean surface. Here, a spatially varying coefficient model was used to estimate tsunami debris accumulation considering the spatial structure of the data off the Tohoku region. Our model revealed the number of vessels nearest the coast at the tsunami event had the highest positive impact, whereas the distance from the coast and kinetic energy influenced negatively. However, the effect of the proximity to the coast wasn't detected in the Sendai bay, indicating spatial dependency of these effects. Our model estimation provides the fundamental information of tsunami debris accumulation on the seafloor, supporting early reconstruction and risk reduction in marine ecosystems and local communities.

Major Role of Surrounding Environment in Shaping Biofilm Community Composition on Marine Plastic Debris

Basili M, Quero GMarina, Giovannelli D, Manini E, Vignaroli C, Avio CGiacomo, De Marco R, Luna GMarco. Major Role of Surrounding Environment in Shaping Biofilm Community Composition on Marine Plastic Debris. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2020 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.00262/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1334659_45_Marine_20200521_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Plastic debris in aquatic environments is colonized by microbes, yet factors influencing biofilm development and composition on plastics remain poorly understood. Here, we explored the microbial assemblages associated with different types of plastic debris collected from two coastal sites in the Mediterranean Sea. All plastic samples were heavily colonized by prokaryotes, with abundances up to 1.9 × 107 cells/cm2. Microbial assemblages on plastics significantly differed between the two geographic areas but not between polymer types, suggesting a major role of the environment as source for the plastisphere composition. Nevertheless, plastic communities differed from those in the surrounding seawater and sediments, indicating a further selection of microbial taxa on the plastic substrates. The presence of potential pathogens on the plastic surface reflected the levels of microbial pollution in the surrounding environment, regardless of the polymer type, and confirmed the role of plastics as carriers for pathogenic microorganisms across the coastal ocean, deserving further investigations.

Pump-underway ship intake: An unexploited opportunity for Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) microplastic monitoring needs on coastal and oceanic waters

Montoto-Martínez T, Hernández-Brito JJoaquín, Gelado-Caballero Mª.Dolores. Pump-underway ship intake: An unexploited opportunity for Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) microplastic monitoring needs on coastal and oceanic waters Martins GM. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2020 ;15(5):e0232744. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0232744
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Broad scale sampling methods for microplastic monitoring in the open ocean waters remain a challenge in oceanography. A large number of samples is required to understand the distribution, abundance and fate of microplastic particles in the environment. Despite more than a decade of widespread study, there is currently no established time series of microplastic measurements and the research community is yet to establish a standardised set of methods that will allow data to be collected in a quick, affordable and interoperable way. We present a sampling technique involving the connection of a custom-built microplastic sampling device to the pump-underway ship intake system of a research vessel (RV) as an unexploited opportunity for oceanic monitoring needs concerning microplastic abundance and distribution. The method is cost effective, highly versatile and accurate, and is able to sample particles down to 50μm from opportunity platforms, thus contributing to an emerging area of study, and in particular helping to increase the monitoring reporting of data, and thereby serving as a valuable aid for the implementation of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Sampling was performed during three consecutive oceanographic cruises in the subtropical NE Atlantic over a year, sampling subsurface waters (4 m depth) during navigation and while on coastal and oceanic stations. Microplastic particles were found in all stations and transects sampled. Fibres (64.42%) were predominant over fragments (35.58%), with the concentration values falling within the ranges of data reported for other areas of the Atlantic.

Examination of the ocean as a source for atmospheric microplastics

Allen S, Allen D, Moss K, Le Roux G, Phoenix VR, Sonke JE. Examination of the ocean as a source for atmospheric microplastics Mukherjee A. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2020 ;15(5):e0232746. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0232746
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Global plastic litter pollution has been increasing alongside demand since plastic products gained commercial popularity in the 1930’s. Current plastic pollutant research has generally assumed that once plastics enter the ocean they are there to stay, retained permanently within the ocean currents, biota or sediment until eventual deposition on the sea floor or become washed up onto the beach. In contrast to this, we suggest it appears that some plastic particles could be leaving the sea and entering the atmosphere along with sea salt, bacteria, virus’ and algae. This occurs via the process of bubble burst ejection and wave action, for example from strong wind or sea state turbulence. In this manuscript we review evidence from the existing literature which is relevant to this theory and follow this with a pilot study which analyses microplastics (MP) in sea spray. Here we show first evidence of MP particles, analysed by μRaman, in marine boundary layer air samples on the French Atlantic coast during both onshore (average of 2.9MP/m3) and offshore (average of 9.6MP/m3) winds. Notably, during sampling, the convergence of sea breeze meant our samples were dominated by sea spray, increasing our capacity to sample MPs if they were released from the sea. Our results indicate a potential for MPs to be released from the marine environment into the atmosphere by sea-spray giving a globally extrapolated figure of 136000 ton/yr blowing on shore.

Microplastic in the Coastal Sea Waters of Russian Far East

Blinovskaya Y, Zakharenko A, Golokhvast K, Chernysh O, Zubtsova I. Microplastic in the Coastal Sea Waters of Russian Far East. IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science [Internet]. 2020 ;459:052068. Available from: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1755-1315/459/5/052068/meta
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Their availability, low cost, applicability in virtually any industrial sector and any household have not only resulted in plastics becoming an everywhere used material, but owing to its specific structure resulting in an issue pertaining to environmental pollution. There are 13 monitoring stations within research area to include recreational and industrial areas differing in hydrodynamic behaviour. The research geography bearing in mind the Russia's scale is not vast so far, yet it is being expanded yearly. Research was done at seven Vladivostok beaches, two beaches at the head of the Amur Bay and three beaches of the Posyet Bay. All the samples taken at the western side of the bay at the depths of 2-6m contained microplastic particles. Quality analysis of all the samples collected was carried out using mass-spectrometric method and that of infrared microscopy. It has been found that the chemical constitution of the samples studied is represented mostly by polyethene, polypropylene, particles of polystyrene and polyvinylchloride. Coastal samples frequently contain cellulose. A certain amount of methylaniline, formaldehydes, and monocarbozides was detected. All the said gives ground for ascertaining harmful influence of microplastics not only on sea water quality but on the state of marine biota.

A framework for selecting and designing policies to reduce marine plastic pollution in developing countries

Alpizar F, Carlsson F, Lanza G, Carney B, Daniels RC, Jaime M, Ho T, Nie Z, Salazar C, Tibesigwa B, et al. A framework for selecting and designing policies to reduce marine plastic pollution in developing countries. Environmental Science & Policy [Internet]. 2020 ;109:25 - 35. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1462901120301489
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The polluting of marine ecosystems with plastics is both a global and a local problem with potentially severe consequences for wildlife, economic activity, and human health. It is a problem that originates in countries’ inability to adequately manage the growing flow of waste. We use an impact pathway framework to trace the flow of plastics through the socio-ecological system and identify the role of specific policy instruments in achieving behavioral changes to reduce marine plastic waste. We produce a toolbox for finding a policy that is suitable for different countries. We use the impact pathway and toolbox to make country-specific recommendations that reflect the reality in each of the selected countries.

Monitoring biofouling as a management tool for reducing toxic antifouling practices in the Baltic Sea

Wrange A-L, Barboza FR, Ferreira J, Eriksson-Wiklund A-K, Ytreberg E, Jonsson PR, Watermann B, Dahlström M. Monitoring biofouling as a management tool for reducing toxic antifouling practices in the Baltic Sea. Journal of Environmental Management [Internet]. 2020 ;264:110447. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301479720303819
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Over two million leisure boats use the coastal areas of the Baltic Sea for recreational purposes. The majority of these boats are painted with toxic antifouling paints that release biocides into the coastal ecosystems and negatively impact non-targeted species. Regulations concerning the use of antifouling paints differ dramatically between countries bordering the Baltic Sea and most of them lack the support of biological data. In the present study, we collected data on biofouling in 17 marinas along the Baltic Sea coast during three consecutive boating seasons (May–October 2014, 2015 and 2016). In this context, we compared different monitoring strategies and developed a fouling index (FI) to characterise marinas according to the recorded biofouling abundance and type (defined according to the hardness and strength of attachment to the substrate). Lower FI values, i.e. softer and/or less abundant biofouling, were consistently observed in marinas in the northern Baltic Sea. The decrease in FI from the south-western to the northern Baltic Sea was partially explained by the concomitant decrease in salinity. Nevertheless, most of the observed changes in biofouling seemed to be determined by local factors and inter-annual variability, which emphasizes the necessity for systematic monitoring of biofouling by end-users and/or authorities for the effective implementation of non-toxic antifouling alternatives in marinas. Based on the obtained results, we discuss how monitoring programs and other related measures can be used to support adaptive management strategies towards more sustainable antifouling practices in the Baltic Sea.

Environmental Status of Italian Coastal Marine Areas Affected by Long History of Contamination

Ausili A, Bergamin L, Romano E. Environmental Status of Italian Coastal Marine Areas Affected by Long History of Contamination. Frontiers in Environmental Science [Internet]. 2020 ;8. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2020.00034/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In the first decades of 2000s, several Italian sites affected by strong anthropogenic impact were recognized as Sites of National Interest (SINs) for a successive reclamation project, some of which also including marine sectors. These coastal areas are characterized by high complexity and diversity as regards the natural setting as well as for extent, history, type, and degree of contamination. For this, the Italian Ministry of Environment charged its scientific research Institute (earlier ICRAM, now ISPRA) with planning a flexible, adaptable, and large-scale environmental characterization. In this context, the investigation of marine sediments was identified as the primary target to assess the environmental status, because of their conservative capacity with respect to contaminants and their role in the exchange processes with other environmental matrices, such as water column and aquatic organisms. A multidisciplinary, chemical–physical, and ecotoxicological survey was identified as the most appropriate and objective criterion for assessing the sediment quality associated, when necessary, with integrative studies. The results derived from this multidisciplinary approach highlighted the main sources of contamination, together with size and extent of the environmental impact on the coastal marine areas, strictly correlated with the kind of anthropogenic activities and coastal morphology. In order to underline how the different environmental setting influences the degree of anthropogenic impact, four different case studies, selected among the more complex by geochemical and geomorphological viewpoints and more extensively studied, were considered. A comprehensive evaluation of these case studies allowed to deduce some general principles concerning the effects of anthropogenic impact, which can be applicable to other transitional and marine coastal areas.

Microplastics on sandy beaches of the southern Baltic Sea

Urban-Malinga B, Zalewski M, Jakubowska A, Wodzinowski T, Malinga M, Pałys B, Dąbrowska A. Microplastics on sandy beaches of the southern Baltic Sea. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2020 ;155:111170. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X20302885
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Microplastic occurrence and composition were investigated along the Polish coast (southern Baltic Sea) on 12 beaches differing in terms of intensity of their touristic exploitation, urbanisation and sediment characteristics. Their mean concentrations varied between 76 and 295 items per kg dry sediment. Fibres and plastic fragments were the dominant microplastic types. Overall, no relationship was found between their concentrations and sediment characteristics. Fine sediments were not identified as microplastic pollution traps. The highest microplastic concentrations were recorded at some urban beaches indicating that population density and the level of coastal infrastructure development are important factors affecting microplastic pollution level on beaches. On the other hand, microplastic concentrations in national parks did not differ substantially from the other beaches. Our results suggest that sediment accumulation processes may exceed microplastic accumulation, and overcome the effect of tourism and/or urbanisation, highlighting the role of the beach hydrodynamic status in structuring beach microplastic pollution.

Finding Plastic Patches in Coastal Waters using Optical Satellite Data

Biermann L, Clewley D, Martinez-Vicente V, Topouzelis K. Finding Plastic Patches in Coastal Waters using Optical Satellite Data. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2020 ;10(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-62298-z
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Satellites collecting optical data offer a unique perspective from which to observe the problem of plastic litter in the marine environment, but few studies have successfully demonstrated their use for this purpose. For the first time, we show that patches of floating macroplastics are detectable in optical data acquired by the European Space Agency (ESA) Sentinel-2 satellites and, furthermore, are distinguishable from naturally occurring materials such as seaweed. We present case studies from four countries where suspected macroplastics were detected in Sentinel-2 Earth Observation data. Patches of materials on the ocean surface were highlighted using a novel Floating Debris Index (FDI) developed for the Sentinel-2 Multi-Spectral Instrument (MSI). In all cases, floating aggregations were detectable on sub-pixel scales, and appeared to be composed of a mix of seaweed, sea foam, and macroplastics. Building first steps toward a future monitoring system, we leveraged spectral shape to identify macroplastics, and a Naïve Bayes algorithm to classify mixed materials. Suspected plastics were successfully classified as plastics with an accuracy of 86%.

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