Recreational Uses

Characterization of Coastal and Marine Recreational Activity in the U.S. Northeast

Bloeser J, Chen C, Gates M, Lipsky A, Longley-Wood K. Characterization of Coastal and Marine Recreational Activity in the U.S. Northeast. Northeast Regional Planning Body; 2015. Available from: http://www.northeastoceandata.org/data-explorer/?recreation
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

To support ocean planning efforts in the Northeast, Point97, the Surfrider Foundation and SeaPlan conducted a study for the Northeast Regional Planning Body to characterize coastal and marine recreational activities. In order to fill a regional need to better understand the spatial patterns of important recreational activities in New England, the study focused on collecting information on commercial whale watching, SCUBA diving, sailing races and regattas, sportfish tournaments, competitive board and paddle events, as well as individual uses, such as beach going, wildlife viewing, surfing, and non-motorized boating (e.g. kayaking). The study team collaborated with industry representatives from the various recreational sectors, including whale watch operators, underwater explorers, surf and dive shop owners, and sailing event organizers, to help guide the development, execution, and review of the study components. Using a combination of online survey tools and in-person participatory mapping techniques, the study used complementary methodologies to gather data by targeting both the expertise of recreational industry leaders as well as individuals who recreate along the coast. Study limitations were specific to each unique data collection approach and reflect the challenges of reaching a diverse set of stakeholders. The resulting datasets fill a gap in the understanding of recreational use in the Northeast through depictions of whale watching areas and transit routes, SCUBA diving areas, landside locations of marine events and spatial data points that characterize non-consumptive activities from individual users. Products from this work are available on the Northeast Regional Planning Body’s website (neoceanplanning.org) and the Northeast Ocean Data Portal (northeastoceandata.org). 

The socio-economic effects of a Marine Protected Area on the ecosystem service of leisure and recreation

Rees SE, Mangi SC, Hattam C, Gall SC, Rodwell LD, Peckett FJ, Attrill MJ. The socio-economic effects of a Marine Protected Area on the ecosystem service of leisure and recreation. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2015 ;62:144 - 152. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X15002626
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are an important tool for the maintenance of marine ecosystem functionality and health and ensuring the onward flow of beneficial ecosystem services that support human well-being. Social and economic factors influence whether and how stakeholders exploit resources or cooperate to conserve them. Environmental managers are now turning from designating MPAs to monitoring their effectiveness. Combining spatial analysis with quantitative and qualitative survey methods this research shows that an MPA (Lyme Bay, SW England) has had varying effects on the delivery of the beneficial ecosystem service of leisure and recreation. In the survey years 2008–2011 dive businesses have increased their frequency of activity inside and outside the MPA and report an increase in turnover; though they perceive little or no effect of the MPA on business. Charter boat operators have seen an overall decline in the frequency of activity outside the MPA and an increase inside the MPA. They perceive that the MPA has increasingly had a positive effect on their business. Sea angling activity has declined at sites outside the MPA and increased at sites within the MPA, suggesting a redistribution of spatial activity. Diving activity has increased both inside and outside the MPA. Divers report that the MPA has influenced where they choose to dive. This corresponds to a potential increase in value of the MPA resource (represented as the proportional expenditure and associated turnover by these groups) of £2.2 million. This research demonstrates that the use of the resource has changed following designation and that MPAs can attract a greater proportion of the leisure and recreation expenditure and associated turnover to sites within the MPA boundary. Moving forward it is important to assess effects both inside and outside MPAs. Integrating high quality social science at MPA sites to track effectiveness can help to adapt and refine management strategies to reflect the needs of the stakeholders and support effective conservation.

Recreational Boating in Ligurian Marine Protected Areas (Italy): A Quantitative Evaluation for a Sustainable Management

Venturini S, Massa F, Castellano M, Costa S, Lavarello I, Olivari E, Povero P. Recreational Boating in Ligurian Marine Protected Areas (Italy): A Quantitative Evaluation for a Sustainable Management. Environmental Management [Internet]. 2015 . Available from: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00267-015-0593-y
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Recreational boating is an important economic activity that can also represent a powerful source of interference for biological communities. The monitoring of the recreational boating in all Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) within the Liguria region was conducted in the 2010 summer season and it allowed to obtain information not provided by any official institution. The collaboration of geographically different MPAs in Liguria has led to the implementation of a monitoring framework of recreational boating, and this has made it possible to develop uniform management strategies for all the Ligurian marine parks. This study identifies the optimal number of boats for each MPAs, the number of boats that can anchor in the various parks without creating any impact on the biocenosis of merit, providing a first characterization of recreational boating in Liguria during the high touristic season and providing management recommendation to each MPAs. Generally, the Ligurian MPAs do not present critical situations, the number of boats in each MPA being below the optimal number, with the exception of Portofino MPA, where in the 12.5 % of monitored days more than 220 boats were counted and the mean density for weekend is 1.19 no boats/ha (4 times higher than weekday). The results confirm the dependence of the boats peaking from the holidays and the months of the summer, but also it highlights other factors that can contribute in the choice of the boaters.

Factors That Can Undermine the Psychological Benefits of Coastal Environments: Exploring the Effect of Tidal State, Presence, and Type of Litter

Wyles KJ, Pahl S, Thomas K, Thompson RC. Factors That Can Undermine the Psychological Benefits of Coastal Environments: Exploring the Effect of Tidal State, Presence, and Type of Litter. Environment and Behavior [Internet]. 2015 . Available from: http://eab.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/0013916515592177
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The beneficial effects of blue environments have been well documented; however, we do not know how marine litter might modify these effects. Three studies adopted a picture-rating task to examine the influence of litter on preference, perceived restorative quality, and psychological impacts. Photographs varied the presence of marine litter (Study 1) and the type of litter (Studies 2 and 3). The influence of tide and the role of connectedness were also explored. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, it was shown that litter can undermine the psychological benefits that the coast ordinarily provides, thus demonstrating that, in addition to environmental costs of marine litter, there are also costs to people. Litter stemming from the public had the most negative impact. This research extends our understanding of the psychological benefits from natural coastal environments and the threats to these benefits from abundant and increasing marine litter.

Jellyfish outbreak impacts on recreation in the Mediterranean Sea: welfare estimates from a socioeconomic pilot survey in Israel

Ghermandi A, Galil B, Gowdy J, Nunes PALD. Jellyfish outbreak impacts on recreation in the Mediterranean Sea: welfare estimates from a socioeconomic pilot survey in Israel. Ecosystem Services [Internet]. 2015 ;11:140 - 147. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212041614001612
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Jellyfish outbreaks in the Mediterranean Sea are part of an anthropogenic alteration of the marine ecosystem and have been documented as health hazards and threats to tourism. Their impacts on human welfare have, however, been poorly quantified. A socioeconomic survey, carried out in summer 2013, captures the impacts of an outbreak of Rhopilema nomadica on seaside recreation in Israel. Welfare losses are estimated based on per-visit value and expected change in visits patterns. We estimate that an outbreak reduces the number of seaside visits by 3–10.5%, with an annual monetary loss of €1.8–6.2 million. An additional 41% of the respondents state that their recreational activities on the beach are affected by the outbreak. Through a contingent valuation, we find that 56% of the respondents state a willingness to contribute to a national environmental protection program with an estimated annual benefit of €14.8 million. These figures signal an opportunity to invest in public information systems. A pilot study for adaptation was conducted in Barcelona, whose results confirm the importance of the welfare benefits of real-time public information systems. This study provides a benchmark against which the economic impacts of jellyfish outbreaks on coastal recreation and potential adaptation policies can be evaluated.

The recreational value of gold coast beaches, Australia: An application of the travel cost method

Zhang F, Wang XHua, Nunes PALD, Ma C. The recreational value of gold coast beaches, Australia: An application of the travel cost method. Ecosystem Services [Internet]. 2015 ;11:106 - 114. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212041614000990
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The Gold Coast beaches are among Australia’s most popular beaches and rank among the world’s best-known beaches. A good understanding of the characteristics of beach users and their recreational use values is of fundamental importance to formulate effective beach management policy. This paper, using the individual travel cost method, estimates the recreational use value of Gold Coast beaches. The value of a single beach visit is estimated to be $19.47 per person. Furthermore, the efficiency of the value transfer method is analysed in this study. To do this, the recreational value of Gold Coast beaches transferred from the relevant studies conducted for other Australian beaches is compared with this study.

Sediment Contaminants and Infauna Associated with Recreational Boating Structures in a Multi-Use Marine Park

Sim VXY, Dafforn KA, Simpson SL, Kelaher BP, Johnston EL. Sediment Contaminants and Infauna Associated with Recreational Boating Structures in a Multi-Use Marine Park. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2015 ;10(6):e0130537. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0130537
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Multi-use marine parks achieve conservation through spatial management of activities. Zoning of marine parks in New South Wales, Australia, includes high conservation areas and special purpose zones (SPZ) where maritime activities are concentrated. Although such measures geographically constrain anthropogenic impacts, we have limited understanding of potential ecological effects. We assessed sediment communities and contaminants adjacent to boating infrastructure (boat ramps, jetties and a marina) in a SPZ from the Clyde Estuary in Batemans Marine Park. Metal concentrations and fines content were elevated at boating structures compared to reference sites. Species richness was higher at sites with boating structures, where capitellid polychaetes and nematodes dominated the communities. Changes associated with boating structures were localised and did not extend beyond breakwalls or to reference sites outside the SPZ. The study highlights the benefits of appropriate zoning in a multi-use marine park and the potential to minimise stress on pristine areas through the application of spatial management.

An Economic and Spatial Baseline of Coastal Recreation in Washington

Anon. An Economic and Spatial Baseline of Coastal Recreation in Washington.; 2015. Available from: https://washington.surfrider.org/surfrider-releases-recreational-use-study-for-the-washington-coast/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Report

The Surfrider Foundation, in partnership with Point 97 and the state of Washington, recently completed the Washington Coastal and Ocean Recreation Study and today released the final report. The study collected economic and spatial data on “non-consumptive” recreational uses such as beach going, kayaking, wildlife viewing, hiking and biking, and surfing. These recreational uses are widely practiced along the extent of Washington’s coast (Pacific Coast & Strait of Juan de Fuca). Information from the study will be used as part of the state’s marine spatial planning process, which is a collaborative endeavor to analyze and allocate the spatial and temporal distribution of human activities in marine environments to achieve ecological, economic, and social objectives.

An Economic and Spatial Baseline of Coastal Recreation in the South Coast of California

Chen C, Hesselgrave T, Enelow N, Steinback C, Sheeran K, Mertens M, Lyman N. An Economic and Spatial Baseline of Coastal Recreation in the South Coast of California. La Jolla, CA: California Sea Grant; 2015. Available from: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/summaries-of-projects-selected-for-funding-through-the-south-coast-mpa-baseline-program
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

This study is a part of a larger baseline marine protected areas monitoring effort, entitled the South Coast MPA Baseline Program, tasked with characterizing the ecological and socioeconomic conditions and changes within the South Coast region since MPA implementation. To investigate coastal recreation patterns in the South Coast region, we utilized a standing internet panel hosted by Knowledge Networks (KN) designed to be demographically representative and surveyed 4,492 individuals in select South Coast region counties. The data collected established a baseline characterization of coastal visitation and recreation statistics and a spatial baseline of coastal recreation use patterns in the region.

An assessment of the effectiveness of in-situ signage in multiple-use marine protected areas in providing information to different recreational users

Martin CL, Momtaz S, Jordan A, Moltschaniwskyj NA. An assessment of the effectiveness of in-situ signage in multiple-use marine protected areas in providing information to different recreational users. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2015 ;56:78 - 85. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X15000512
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In-situ signage is a cost effective environmental education tool used in marine protected area (MPA) management, and the design and location of signage is crucial to attract the attention of targeted audiences. The implementation of multiple-use MPAs increases the challenges of communicating awareness of MPA boundaries and permitted activities. Currently, little is known about how effective signage in multiple-use MPAs is in communicating information to stakeholders that will promote supportive attitudes and behaviours towards MPAs. This study evaluated the usefulness of in-situ signage in an existing multiple-use MPA, to determine if signs pertaining to the MPA captured the attention of recreational users, and provided adequate information. Structured interviews with recreational fishers, divers, and other users, were used to determine users׳ awareness of being in an MPA, their awareness of management objectives and associated zoning scheme, together with levels of agreement or disagreement on whether or not current in-situ signage adequately communicates information about the MPA. It was evident that the types and accessibility of in-situ signs in the MPA may not be effective at capturing the attention of intended audiences and providing relevant information, with the exception of signs located at the dive site, due to their design, size, and placement. Awareness differed among the three user groups, together with their views on the effectiveness of signage. Many recreational fishers believed existing signage was inadequate and unclear, and expressed frustrations with the complexity of zoning rules and location of their boundaries. Based on this study, recommendations about the presentation, content, and placement of signage relative to access points, and information required by MPA users, is provided.

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