Resilience

Building household economic resilience to secure a future for near shore fishers in the Philippines

Lomboy CG, Belinario F, Pomeroy R, Pedrajas J, Tirona RSanchez, Box S, Domondon PRoberto, Balbido-Ramirez K. Building household economic resilience to secure a future for near shore fishers in the Philippines. Marine Policy [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18305050
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Resilience has become a key concept for addressing the vulnerability of small-scale fishing households in developing countries. While effort has gone into defining the concept of resilience in relation to fishing households; very little application of the concept exists in practice. An economic resiliency strategy was developed that builds resilience through improved household assets to reduce risks and vulnerabilities. A foundational conclusion of the strategy is the importance of linking household livelihood interventions to sustainable fishing behaviors. The conservation enterprise approach facilitated a mutually beneficial relationship between biodiversity conservation and livelihoods.

Resilience of an inshore fishing population in Hong Kong: Paradox and potential for sustainable fishery policy

Patchell J, Cheng C. Resilience of an inshore fishing population in Hong Kong: Paradox and potential for sustainable fishery policy. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2019 ;99:157 - 169. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X17306747
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The existence and dilemmas of metropolitan fisheries have been overlooked in research on the resilience of coastal marine socio-ecological systems. Yet, they could produce a model of sustainable fisheries with significant global impact. To fill that research gap, this study investigates an inshore fishery population that has sustained itself within Hong Kong's rapid urban development, seeking to understand the reasons for its survival. The results indicate that the values of self-reliance and entrepreneurialism exacted by fishing enabled the fishers to make necessary adaptations and reposition themselves in mariculture and service industries. These new ventures, while retaining marine-based livelihoods, draw the fishers away from fishing activities. The paradox of this value-based resilience of a metropolitan fishery is discussed for its potential to generate policies to strengthen linkages among the fishers’ business activities and to create a sustainable fishery model useful in other contexts.

Resilience and social capital: The engagement of fisheries communities in marine spatial planning

Bakker YW, de Koning J, van Tatenhove J. Resilience and social capital: The engagement of fisheries communities in marine spatial planning. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2019 ;99:132 - 139. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18301441
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Between 2010 and 2016, the Orkney Islands Council, Highland Council and Marine Scotland have collaborated to develop a pilot Marine Spatial Plan for the Pentland Firth and Orkney Waters in Scotland. This paper explores the challenges of marine spatial planning processes by looking at the possibilities for fisheries communities to mobilize their social capital – in the form of bonding, bridging or linking – in order to re-position and to empower themselves in these processes. This paper aims to uncover the resilience of local communities that deploy social capital in order to influence MSP processes and safeguard their own interests. For this article ten weeks of qualitative fieldwork in the form of in-depth interviews and participant observation with stakeholders of the pilot marine spatial plan were conducted on the Orkney Islands in Scotland. The strong bonding social capital among fishermen in Orkney has resulted in a resilient community identity which allows for collaboration and self-organization, but also creates a defensive mentality which does not favor linking. Furthermore, a lack of trust in governmental authorities inhibits the mobilization of linking social capital among fishermen, obstructing the ability to access power through cross-scale connections. In response the fisheries community uses bridging social capital outside governance arenas to access networks and mobilize resources to strengthen its socio-economic and political position in support of future linking social capital. Researching this complex interrelation and functioning of social capital uncovers some of the social dimensions and socio-institutional constraints for fisheries engagement with and power in marine spatial planning.

Translating resilience-based management theory to practice for coral bleaching recovery in Hawai‘i

Chung A, Oliver T, Gove J, Gorospe K, White D, Davidson K, Walsh W. Translating resilience-based management theory to practice for coral bleaching recovery in Hawai‘i. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2019 ;99:58 - 68. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18303841
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

More frequent and severe coral bleaching events are prompting managers to seek practical interventions to promote ecosystem resilience. Although resilience-based management is now well established theoretically, there have been few examples of implementation. In Hawai‘i, back-to-back bleaching events in 2014 and 2015 caused significant damage motivating the state to seek guidance on next steps for recovery. Hawai‘i is a unique case study in distilling global recommendations to place-based action because of its ecological and social diversity. This study conducted a systematic review of literature using a weighted point system to evaluate and rank twelve potential Hawai‘i-specific interventions to promote coral recovery following a bleaching event. Papers were scored based on their ability to achieve their management objective as well as their ability to directly affect coral recovery. A total of 100 papers were included in the review which varied in their scale (multi-site or case study), location (inside or outside of Hawai‘i), and type of data collected (theoretical or empirical). Establishing a network of herbivore management areas ranked the highest followed by parrotfish size limits for action that could promote recovery in Hawai‘i. Establishing a network of no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) was the intervention with the most literature and ranked third. This method provided a systematic way to compare the effectiveness of management interventions, a system that could be adapted to other regions. This type of evidence-based approach can lead to more fair and transparent decision-making processes, assisting reef managers in navigating the translation of resilience-based management from theory to practice.

Adaptive capacity of small-scale coastal fishers to climate and non-climate stressors in the Western region of Ghana

Freduah G, Fidelman P, Smith TF. Adaptive capacity of small-scale coastal fishers to climate and non-climate stressors in the Western region of Ghana. The Geographical Journal [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://rgs-ibg.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/geoj.12282
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Small‐scale coastal fisheries (SSCF) in the Western region of Ghana are affected by a combination of climate and non‐climate stressors. Coastal communities are particularly vulnerable to these stressors because of their proximity to the sea and high dependence on small‐scale fisheries for their livelihoods. A better understanding of how fishing communities, particularly SSCF, respond to climate and non‐climate stressors is paramount to improve planning and implementation of effective adaptation action. Drawing on the capitals framework, this study examines the adaptive capacity of SSCF to the combined effects of climate‐related (increasing coastal erosion, and wave and storm frequency) and non‐climate‐related stressors (declining catches; scarcity and prohibitive cost of fuel; inconsiderate implementation of fisheries laws and policies; competition from the oil and gas industry; sand mining; and algal blooms). The findings show how fishers mobilise and use adaptive capacity through exploitation of various forms of capital, including cultural capital (e.g., local innovation); political capital (e.g., lobbying government and local authorities); social capital (e.g., collective action); human capital (e.g., local leadership); and natural capital (e.g., utilising beach sand) to respond to multiple stressors. Nevertheless, in many cases, fishers’ responses were reactive and led to negative (maladaptive) outcomes. Furthermore, this study underscores the importance of critically considering the interactive nature of capitals and how they collectively influence adaptive capacity in the planning and implementation of adaptation research, policy and practice.

Long-lasting income shocks and adaptations: Evidence from coral bleaching in Indonesia

Chaijaroen P. Long-lasting income shocks and adaptations: Evidence from coral bleaching in Indonesia. Journal of Development Economics [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304387818305169
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

This paper explores how people adapt to climate shocks, specifically coral bleaching, that have long-lasting impacts on income. Caused mainly by abnormally high sea surface temperature, coral bleaching has significant effects on marine resources. Using panel data from Indonesia and exogenous variations in bleaching, I observe that fishery households in affected areas experienced a decrease in income relative to other households. Although consumption expenditures did not decline significantly in response to these income shocks, these households reduced their protein consumption in the short and long runs. Regarding labor market outcomes, the affected households tended to substantially increase their labor supply and switch industries only in the long run.

Remote sensing of unhelpful resilience to sea level rise caused by mangrove expansion: A case study of islands in Florida Bay, USA

Zhai L, Zhang B, Roy SSen, Fuller DO, Sternberg Lda Silveir. Remote sensing of unhelpful resilience to sea level rise caused by mangrove expansion: A case study of islands in Florida Bay, USA. Ecological Indicators [Internet]. 2019 ;97:51 - 58. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X1830757X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Previous studies have found that vegetated coastal areas can increase their elevation indicating resilience to inundation by sea level rise (SLR), but the potential resilience were ignored or showed controversial results (i.e., soil accretion of vegetated areas vs. SLR). To estimate the resilience influences on 15 islands in Florida Bay (Florida, U.S.), our study used indicators (areas of the 15 islands and their mangrove forests) by analyzing 61-yr high-resolution historical aerial photographs and a 27-yr time-series of Landsat images. In these islands, coastal fringes are dominated by mangroves, and inland parts are dominated by brackish or freshwater species. Our results showed that: (1) despite rising sea levels, these low-lying islands significantly increased in area; (2) all of these islands had significant mangrove expansion, and the landward part of expansion led to the replacement of inland non-mangrove habitats; (3) there was a positive relationship between the increase of island area and mangrove expansion in these islands; (4) without the mangrove expansion, simulations showed that all of the islands had decreased areas by 2014 compared with that in 1953. On the basis of our spatial analyses and previous field studies in our study areas, these islands showed resilience to inundation and the mangrove expansion contributed to processes stabilizing these islands under SLR. Meanwhile, the mangrove expansion were partly at the expense of the habitats previously covered by non-mangrove species, thus potentially leading to a loss of plant diversity. Therefore, the mangrove expansion increased unhelpful resilience to maintain islands in a degraded state losing biodiversity, which should be considered in conservation accounting for future SLR. Moreover, the unhelpful resilience can be monitored by remote sensing based indicators, such as island area.

Resilience through risk management: cooperative insurance in small-holder aquaculture systems

Watson JR, Armerin F, Klinger DH, Belton B. Resilience through risk management: cooperative insurance in small-holder aquaculture systems. Heliyon [Internet]. 2018 ;4(9):e00799. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S240584401830450X
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Aquaculture is a booming industry. It currently supplies almost half of all fish and shellfish eaten today, and it continues to grow faster than any other food production sector. But it is immature relative to terrestrial crop and livestock sectors, and as a consequence it lags behind in terms of the use of aquaculture specific financial risk management tools. In particular, the use of insurance instruments to manage weather related losses is little used. In the aquaculture industry there is a need for new insurance products that achieve both financial gains, in terms of reduced production and revenue risk, and environmental wins, in terms of incentivizing improved management practices. Here, we have developed a cooperative form of indemnity insurance for application to small-holder aquaculture communities in developing nations. We use and advance the theory of risk pools, applying it to an aquaculture community in Myanmar, using empirical data recently collected from a comprehensive farm survey. These data were used to parameterize numerical simulations of this aquaculture system with and without a risk pool. Results highlight the benefits and costs of a risk pool, for various combinations of key parameters. This information reveals a path forward for creating new risk management products for aquaculturalists around the world.

Coral reef degradation affects the potential for reef recovery after disturbance

Roth F, Saalmann F, Thomson T, Coker DJ, Villalobos R, Jones BH, Wild C, Carvalho S. Coral reef degradation affects the potential for reef recovery after disturbance. Marine Environmental Research [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0141113618305002
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The loss of coral cover is often accompanied by an increase of benthic algae, a decline in biodiversity and habitat complexity. However, it remains unclear how surrounding communities influence the trajectories of re-colonization between pulse disturbance events. Over a 12-month field experiment in the central Red Sea, we examined how healthy (hard-coral dominated) and degraded (algae-dominated) reef areas influence recruitment and succession patterns of benthic reef foundation communities on bare substrates. Crustose coralline algae and other calcifiers were important colonizers in the healthy reef area, promoting the accumulation of inorganic carbon. Contrary, substrates in the degraded area were predominantly colonized by turf algae, lowering the accumulation of inorganic carbon by 178%. While coral larvae settlement similarly occurred in both habitats, degraded areas showed 50% fewer recruits. Our findings suggest that in degraded reefs the replenishment of adult coral populations is reduced due to recruitment inhibition through limited habitat complexity and grazing pressure, thereby restraining reef recovery.

Scenario planning with linked land-sea models inform where forest conservation actions will promote coral reef resilience

Delevaux JMS, Jupiter SD, Stamoulis KA, Bremer LL, Wenger AS, Dacks R, Garrod P, Falinski KA, Ticktin T. Scenario planning with linked land-sea models inform where forest conservation actions will promote coral reef resilience. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2018 ;8(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-29951-0
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

We developed a linked land-sea modeling framework based on remote sensing and empirical data, which couples sediment export and coral reef models at fine spatial resolution. This spatially-explicit (60 × 60 m) framework simultaneously tracks changes in multiple benthic and fish indicators as a function of land-use and climate change scenarios. We applied this framework in Kubulau District, Fiji, to investigate the effects of logging, agriculture expansion, and restoration on coral reef resilience. Under the deforestation scenario, models projected a 4.5-fold sediment increase (>7,000 t. yr−1) coupled with a significant decrease in benthic habitat quality across 1,940 ha and a reef fish biomass loss of 60.6 t. Under the restoration scenario, models projected a small (<30 t. yr−1) decrease in exported sediments, resulting in a significant increase in benthic habitat quality across 577 ha and a fish biomass gain of 5.7 t. The decrease in benthic habitat quality and loss of fish biomass were greater when combining climate change and deforestation scenarios. We evaluated where land-use change and bleaching scenarios would impact sediment runoff and downstream coral reefs to identify priority areas on land, where conservation or restoration could promote coral reef resilience in the face of climate change.

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