Restoration

Rapid and direct recoveries of predators and prey through synchronized ecosystem management

Samhouri JF, Stier AC, Hennessey SM, Novak M, Halpern BS, Levin PS. Rapid and direct recoveries of predators and prey through synchronized ecosystem management. Nature Ecology & Evolution [Internet]. 2017 ;1:0068. Available from: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-016-0068
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

One of the twenty-first century’s greatest environmental challenges is to recover and restore species, habitats and ecosystems. The decision about how to initiate restoration is best-informed by an understanding of the linkages between ecosystem components and, given these linkages, an appreciation of the consequences of choosing to recover one ecosystem component before another. However, it remains difficult to predict how the sequence of species’ recoveries within food webs influences the speed and trajectory of restoration, and what that means for human well-being. Here, we develop theory to consider the ecological and social implications of synchronous versus sequential (species-by-species) recovery in the context of exploited food webs. A dynamical systems model demonstrates that synchronous recovery of predators and prey is almost always more efficient than sequential recovery. Compared with sequential recovery, synchronous recovery can be twice as fast and produce transient fluctuations of much lower amplitude. A predator-first strategy is particularly slow because it counterproductively suppresses prey recovery. An analysis of real-world predator–prey recoveries shows that synchronous and sequential recoveries are similarly common, suggesting that current practices are not ideal. We highlight policy tools that can facilitate swift and steady recovery of ecosystem structure, function and associated services.

Spatiotemporal dynamics of submerged macrophyte status and watershed exploitation in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon: Understanding critical factors in ecosystem degradation and restoration

Pasqualini V, Derolez V, Garrido M, Orsoni V, Baldi Y, Etourneau S, Leoni V, Rébillout P, Laugier T, Souchu P, et al. Spatiotemporal dynamics of submerged macrophyte status and watershed exploitation in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon: Understanding critical factors in ecosystem degradation and restoration. Ecological Engineering [Internet]. 2017 ;102:1 - 14. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925857417300368
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Increases in the intensity of disturbances in coastal lagoons can lead to shifts in vegetation from aquatic angiosperms to macroalgal or phytoplankton communities. Such abrupt and discontinuous responses are facilitated by instability in the equilibrium controlling the trajectory of the community response. We hypothesized that the shift in macrophyte populations is reversible, and that this reversibility is dependent on changes in the pressures exerted on the watershed and lagoon functioning. Biguglia lagoon (Mediterranean Sea, Corsica) is an interesting case study for the evaluation of long-term coastal lagoon ecosystem functioning and the trajectory of submerged macrophyte responses to disturbances, to facilitate the appropriate restoration of ecosystems. We used historical data for a two hundred-year period to assess changes in human activities on the watershed of the Biguglia lagoon. Macrophyte mapping (from 1970) and monitoring data for dynamics (from 1999) were used to investigate the trajectory of the community response. The changes observed in this watershed included a large number of hydrological developments affecting salinity and resulting in changes in macrophyte distribution. Nutrient inputs over the last 40 years have led to a shift in the aquatic vegetation from predominantly aquatic angiosperm community to macroalgae and phytoplankton in 2007 (dystrophic crisis). Changes in hydrological management and improvements in sewage treatment after 2007 led to a significant increase of aquatic angiosperms over a relatively short period of time (4–5 years), particularly for Ruppia cirrhosa and Stuckenia pectinata. There has been a significant resurgence of Najas marina, due to changes in salinity. The observed community shift suggests that Biguglia lagoon is resilient and that the transition may be reversible. The restored communities closely resemble those present before disturbance. These findings demonstrate the need to understand watershed exploitation and ecosystem variability in lagoon restoration.

The cost and feasibility of marine coastal restoration

Bayraktarov E, Saunders MI, Abdullah S, Mills M, Beher J, Possingham HP, Mumby PJ, Lovelock CE. The cost and feasibility of marine coastal restoration. Ecological Applications [Internet]. 2016 ;26(4):1055 - 1074. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1890/15-1077/abstract
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Land-use change in the coastal zone has led to worldwide degradation of marine coastal ecosystems and a loss of the goods and services they provide. Restoration is the process of assisting the recovery of an ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged, or destroyed and is critical for habitats where natural recovery is hindered. Uncertainties about restoration cost and feasibility can impede decisions on whether, what, how, where, and how much to restore. Here, we perform a synthesis of 235 studies with 954 observations from restoration or rehabilitation projects of coral reefs, seagrass, mangroves, saltmarshes, and oyster reefs worldwide, and evaluate cost, survival of restored organisms, project duration, area, and techniques applied. Findings showed that while the median and average reported costs for restoration of one hectare of marine coastal habitat were around US$80 000 (2010) and US$1 600 000 (2010), respectively, the real total costs (median) are likely to be two to four times higher. Coral reefs and seagrass were among the most expensive ecosystems to restore. Mangrove restoration projects were typically the largest and the least expensive per hectare. Most marine coastal restoration projects were conducted in Australia, Europe, and USA, while total restoration costs were significantly (up to 30 times) cheaper in countries with developing economies. Community- or volunteer-based marine restoration projects usually have lower costs. Median survival of restored marine and coastal organisms, often assessed only within the first one to two years after restoration, was highest for saltmarshes (64.8%) and coral reefs (64.5%) and lowest for seagrass (38.0%). However, success rates reported in the scientific literature could be biased towards publishing successes rather than failures. The majority of restoration projects were short-lived and seldom reported monitoring costs. Restoration success depended primarily on the ecosystem, site selection, and techniques applied rather than on money spent. We need enhanced investment in both improving restoration practices and large-scale restoration.

Turning casualty into opportunity: fragmenting dislodged colonies is effective for restoring reefs of a Mediterranean endemic coral

Musco L, Prada F, D’Anna G, Galasso NMaria, Pipitone C, Fernández TVega, Badalamenti F. Turning casualty into opportunity: fragmenting dislodged colonies is effective for restoring reefs of a Mediterranean endemic coral. Ecological Engineering [Internet]. 2017 ;98:206 - 212. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925857416306188
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Within the framework of ecosystem-based management, restoration appears as a sensible option to counteract the global decline of coral reefs. Several techniques involving sexual and asexual coral propagules have been used for the restoration of reefs. Culturing of fragments has proved fruitful since it takes advantage of the capability of corals to asexually reproduce, providing a number of novel colonies that can be replanted. This method however, when using fragments detached from a colony, might be stressful for the wild donor. Astroides calycularis is an endemic and endangered Mediterranean scleractinian coral forming massive colonies mostly at shallow depth. It is subject to anthropogenic impact, particularly from damage due to accidental contacts by SCUBA divers, and it is expected to suffer from sea storms of increasing power under the projected climate change scenarios. Corals of opportunity (i.e. dislodged colonies found alive on the seabed) may be a useful resource for the restoration of A. calycularis reefs, given that the fragment-based transplant technique is effective for this species as it is for other massive corals. A one-year transplant experiment was carried out along an exposed rocky shore in NW Sicily (Mediterranean Sea) to test the feasibility of using fragments of corals of opportunity for restoration purposes. The transplants revealed high survival rates and higher number of new polyps than in control colonies. The original size of transplanted fragments did not influence their capability to bud new polyps and was not related to their survival rate. The applied technique provides the opportunity to restore rocky reefs, even the very shallow ones, through direct transplant of coral fragments, thus making reef restoration a feasible option in ecosystem-based management plans for this species.

Understanding the distribution of economic benefits from improving coastal and marine ecosystems

Pakalniete K, Aigars J, Czajkowski M, Strake S, Zawojska E, Hanley N. Understanding the distribution of economic benefits from improving coastal and marine ecosystems. Science of The Total Environment [Internet]. 2017 ;584-585:29 - 40. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969717301080
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The ecological status of coastal and marine waterbodies world-wide is threatened by multiple stressors, including nutrient inputs from various sources and increasing occurrences of invasive alien species. These stressors impact the environmental quality of the Baltic Sea. Each Baltic Sea country contributes to the stressors and, at the same time, is affected by their negative impacts on water quality. Knowledge about benefits from improvements in coastal and marine waters is key to assessing public support for policies aimed at achieving such changes. We propose a new approach to account for variability in benefits related to differences in socio-demographics of respondents, by using a structural model of discrete choice. Our method allows to incorporate a wide range of socio-demographics as explanatory variables in conditional multinomial logit models without the risk of collinearity; the model is estimated jointly and hence more statistically efficient than the alternative, typically used approaches. We apply this new technique to a study of the preferences of Latvian citizens towards improvements of the coastal and marine environment quality. We find that overall, Latvians are willing to pay for reducing losses of biodiversity, for improving water quality for recreation by reduced eutrophication, and for reducing new occurrences of invasive alien species. However a significant group within the sample seems not to value environmental improvements in the Baltic Sea, and, thus, is unwilling to support costly measures for achieving such improvements. The structural model of discrete choice reveals substantial heterogeneity among Latvians towards changes in the quality of coastal and marine waters of Latvia.

Growth performance of Acropora formosa in natural reefs and coral nurseries for reef restoration

Xin LH, Adzis KAA, Hyde J, Cob ZC. Growth performance of Acropora formosa in natural reefs and coral nurseries for reef restoration. AACL Bioflux [Internet]. 2016 ;9(5):1090 - 1100. Available from: http://www.bioflux.com.ro/docs/2016.1090-1100.pdf
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Abstract. Coral reefs are highly valuable ecosystems and play crucial roles in marine ecosystem dynamics by providing food and shelters for many organisms. Unfortunately, coral reefs around the globe are declining, thus apart from marine protected areas, active conservation and restoration efforts are extremely crucial. In this study Acropora formosa nubbins were transplanted and their performance were monitored, with the main aim to evaluate their survivals and growth in comparison with natural reef. The extension growth, proto-branch generation, mortality and survivals were assessed for one year in Tioman Island, Malaysia. The A. formosa growth rates ranged from 0.59±0.07 to 1.20±0.03 cm mth-1 in the nursery and from 0.55±0.13 to 0.72±0.11 cm mth-1 in the natural reef. The transplanted corals exhibit higher growth rates particularly during early period of transplant, and moreover have significantly higher proto-branch generation rates compared with the natural colony. However, their survivals were significantly low, mostly due to predation by fish and other corallivores. Seasonal variations in coral growth were observed, with faster rates during the inter-monsoon period (March-April and October- November). This study for the first time, documented the success of A. formosa transplantation and its application in coral nurseries in Malaysian waters. Coral transplantation is highly beneficial for active coral reef restoration and conservation. Nevertheless, continuous long term, systematic monitoring are needed in order to have greater understanding of the A. formosa growth and dynamics in the tropical coral reef ecosystems. 

A spatial model to improve site selection for seagrass restoration in shallow boating environments

Hotaling-Hagan A, Swett R, L. Ellis R, Frazer TK. A spatial model to improve site selection for seagrass restoration in shallow boating environments. Journal of Environmental Management [Internet]. 2017 ;186:42 - 54. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301479716307770
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Due to widespread and continuing seagrass loss, restoration attempts occur worldwide. This article presents a geospatial modeling technique that ranks the suitability of sites for restoration based on light availability and boating activity, two factors cited in global studies of seagrass loss and restoration failures. The model presented here was created for Estero Bay, Florida and is a predictive model of light availability and boating pressure to aid seagrass restoration efforts. The model is adaptive and can be parameterized for different locations and updated as additional data is collected and knowledge of how factors impact seagrass improves. Light data used for model development were collected over one year from 50 sites throughout the bay. Coupled with high resolution bathymetric data, bottom mean light availability was predicted throughout the bay. Data collection throughout the year also allowed for prediction of light variability at sites, a possible indicator of seagrass growth and survival. Additionally, survey data on boating activities were used to identify areas, outside of marked navigation channels, that receive substantial boating pressure and are likely poor candidate sites for seagrass restoration. The final map product identifies areas where the light environment was suitable for seagrasses and boating pressure was low. A composite map showing the persistence of seagrass coverage in the study area over four years, between 1999 and 2006, was used to validate the model. Eighty-nine percent of the area where seagrass persisted (had been mapped all four years) was ranked as suitable for restoration: 42% with the highest rank (7), 28% with a rank of 6, and 19% with a rank of 5. The results show that the model is a viable tool for selection of seagrass restoration sites in Florida and elsewhere. With knowledge of the light environment and boating patterns, managers will be better equipped to set seagrass restoration and water quality improvement targets and select sites for restoration. The modeling approach outlined here is broadly applicable and will be of value to a large and diverse suite of scientists and marine resource managers.

Seed Predation by the Shore Crab Carcinus maenas: A Positive Feedback Preventing Eelgrass Recovery?

Infantes E, Crouzy C, Moksnes P-O. Seed Predation by the Shore Crab Carcinus maenas: A Positive Feedback Preventing Eelgrass Recovery?. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(12):e0168128. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0168128
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

There is an increasing interest to restore the ecosystem services that eelgrass provides, after their continuous worldwide decline. Most attempts to restore eelgrass using seeds are challenged by very high seed losses and the reasons for these losses are not all clear. We assess the impact of predation on seed loss and eelgrass establishment, and explore methods to decrease seed loss during restoration in the Swedish northwest coast. In a laboratory study we identified three previously undescribed seed predators, the shore crab Carcinus maenas, the hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus and the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, of which shore crabs consumed 2–7 times more seeds than the other two species. The importance of shore crabs as seed predators was supported in field cage experiments where one enclosed crab caused 73% loss of seeds over a 1-week period on average (~ 21 seeds per day). Seedling establishment was significantly higher (14%) in cages that excluded predators over an 8-month period than in uncaged plots and cages that allowed predators but prevented seed-transport (0.5%), suggesting that seed predation constitutes a major source of seed loss in the study area. Burying the seeds 2 cm below the sediment surface prevented seed predation in the laboratory and decreased predation in the field, constituting a way to decrease seed loss during restoration. Shore crabs may act as a key feedback mechanism that prevent the return of eelgrass both by direct consumption of eelgrass seeds and as a predator of algal mesograzers, allowing algal mats to overgrow eelgrass beds. This shore crab feedback mechanism could become self-generating by promoting the growth of its own nursery habitat (algal mats) and by decreasing the nursery habitat (seagrass meadow) of its dominant predator (cod). This double feedback-loop is supported by a strong increase of shore crab abundance in the last decades and may partly explain the regime shift in vegetation observed along the Swedish west coast.

Density Dependence Drives Habitat Production and Survivorship of Acropora cervicornis Used for Restoration on a Caribbean Coral Reef

Ladd MC, Shantz AA, Nedimyer K, Burkepile DE. Density Dependence Drives Habitat Production and Survivorship of Acropora cervicornis Used for Restoration on a Caribbean Coral Reef. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2016 ;3. Available from: http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmars.2016.00261/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Coral restoration is gaining traction as a viable strategy to help restore degraded reefs. While the nascent field of coral restoration has rapidly progressed in the past decade, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the drivers of restoration success that may impede our ability to effectively restore coral reef communities. Here, we conducted a field experiment to investigate the influence of coral density on the growth, habitat production, and survival of corals outplanted for restoration. We used nursery-raised colonies of Acropora cervicornis to experimentally establish populations of corals with either 3, 6, 12, or 24 corals within 4m2plots, generating a gradient of coral densities ranging from 0.75 corals m−2 to 12 corals m−2. After 13 months we found that density had a significant effect on the growth, habitat production, and survivorship of restored corals. We found that coral survivorship increased as colony density decreased. Importantly, the signal of density dependent effects was context dependent. Our data suggest that positive density dependent effects influenced habitat production at densities of 3 corals m−2, but further increases in density resulted in negative density dependent effects with decreasing growth and survivorship of corals. These findings highlight the importance of density dependence for coral restoration planning and demonstrate the need to evaluate the influence of density for other coral species used for restoration. Further work focused on the mechanisms causing density dependence such as increased herbivory, rapid disease transmission, or altered predation rates are important next steps to advance our ability to effectively restore coral reefs.

Addressing the mismatch between restoration objectives and monitoring needs to support mangrove management

Stokes DJ, Bulmer RH, Lundquist CJ. Addressing the mismatch between restoration objectives and monitoring needs to support mangrove management. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2016 ;134:69 - 78. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569116302198
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Restoration projects require an underpinning of science to maximise success at restoring ecological function. Occasionally wetland restoration objectives focus on clearing intertidal vegetation, including removal of introduced and rapidly expanding native species, such as the expansion of mangrove forests in New Zealand. Typical objectives of these restoration projects addressing mangrove expansion include restoring intertidal sites to historically sand-dominated substrates that are associated with higher societal and cultural values through recreational access, natural character (e.g., viewscape) and enhancement of shellfish resources. Historically, mangrove management occurred with minimal or no monitoring to confirm if these objectives were achieved, and with no consistent approach in terms of restoration methodology or monitoring used across the various management jurisdictions. This paper reviews the monitoring programs associated to date with restoration projects in New Zealand involving mangrove removal, with an aim to outline the key management considerations and environmental measures that should be included in future monitoring programs. Monitoring techniques that should be included in management activities that involve mangrove removals are summarised, highlighting methodologies to document changes in surface topography, sediment characteristics and various biological changes. The monitoring objectives have been categorised in three levels, relative to the complexity of the technique and the cost. We hope that this paper will be useful to any group or organisation around the globe who wish to document the extent and rate of change where mangrove vegetation has been cleared. Better documentation on successes and failures of management actions related to mangrove expansion can inform future management strategies, and prioritise cost-effective actions in locations that are likely to result in successful restoration of ecological function of estuarine habitats.

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