Sea-level Rise, Coastal Flooding, and Storm Events

Linking management planning for coastal wetlands to potential future wave attenuation under a range of relative sea-level rise scenarios

Hijuelos ACommagere, Dijkstra JT, Carruthers TJB, Heynert K, Reed DJ, van Wesenbeeck BK. Linking management planning for coastal wetlands to potential future wave attenuation under a range of relative sea-level rise scenarios Chapman MGeraldine. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2019 ;14(5):e0216695. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0216695
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Understanding changes in wave attenuation by emergent vegetation as wetlands degrade or accrete over time is crucial for incorporation of wetlands into holistic coastal risk management. Linked SLAMM and XBeach models were used to investigate potential future changes in wave attenuation over a 50-year period in a degrading, subtropical wetland and a prograding, temperate wetland. These contrasting systems also have differing management contexts and were contrasted to demonstrate how the linked models can provide management-relevant insights. Morphological development of wetlands for different scenarios of sea-level rise and accretion was simulated with SLAMM and then coupled with different vegetation characteristics to predict the influence on future wave attenuation using XBeach. The geomorphological context, subsidence, and accretion resulted in large predicted reductions in the extent of vegetated land (e.g., wetland) and changes in wave height reduction potential across the wetland. These were exacerbated by increases in sea-level from +0.217 m to +0.386 m over a 50-year period, especially at the lowest accretion rates in the degrading wetland. Mangrove vegetation increased wave attenuation within the degrading, subtropical, saline wetland, while grazing reduced wave attenuation in the temperate, prograding wetland. Coastal management decisions and actions, related to coastal vegetation type and structure, have the potential to change future wave attenuation at a spatial scale relevant to coastal protection planning. Therefore, a coastal management approach that includes disaster risk reduction, biodiversity, and climate change, can be informed by coastal modeling tools, such as those demonstrated here for two contrasting case studies.

Accounting for spatial patterns in deriving sea-level rise thresholds for salt marsh stability: More than just total areas?

Wu W. Accounting for spatial patterns in deriving sea-level rise thresholds for salt marsh stability: More than just total areas?. Ecological Indicators [Internet]. 2019 ;103:260 - 271. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212041618305898
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Ecological threshold is an important concept to indicate the boundary of alternate states of ecosystems driven by environmental conditions and to facilitate evaluation of ecosystem resilience. Sea-level rise (SLR) thresholds for the stability of salt marshes, if studied in two dimensions, are generally derived based on total areas without systematic accounting for spatial patterns related to edges, shapes, and contagions of patches. As these spatial patterns are potentially important for functions and ecosystem services of salt marshes and they are likely to be impacted by SLR in a different way from the total areas, it is necessary to study SLR thresholds based on these spatial patterns to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of salt marsh resilience to SLR. This research compares the SLR thresholds based on these spatial patterns of salt marshes to those based on total areas alone across different spatial resolutions.

The spatial patterns of salt marshes were quantified by 26 commonly used landscape metrics, predicted from a mechanistic wetland change model. At spatial resolutions of 2–100 m, SLR thresholds were first derived using individual landscape metrics and then the first principal component that explained >80% of total variance of these metrics showing threshold responses to SLR. In order to separate the effect of spatial configuration from composition, a neutral model which simulated the same amount of salt marsh change as the mechanistic model but at the random locations was applied. The SLR thresholds were derived based on the simulations from the neutral model and compared to those from the mechanistic model.

The results show that total area-based SLR thresholds do not comprehensively represent salt marshes’ resilience to SLR. Particularly, I find 1) the derived SLR thresholds vary from 7.29 to 11.12 mm/yr for 2100 based on landscape metrics used, 2) the SLR threshold based on the first principal components (7.99 mm/yr) is smaller than that based on the total area only (8.40 mm/yr), 3) the SLR thresholds are scale dependent, and 4) the spatial configuration’ effect on SLR thresholds is smaller for smaller salt marsh areas compared to larger salt marsh areas.

This study highlights the need to account for different spatial patterns of salt marshes and apply wetland maps with a spatial resolutions of 30 m or finer in deriving SLR thresholds, as using total areas alone or coarser-resolution maps may provide a biased interpretation that salt marshes are more resilient to SLR than they actually are.

Disaster on the Horizon: The Price Effect of Sea Level Rise

Bernstein A, Gustafson MT, Lewis R. Disaster on the Horizon: The Price Effect of Sea Level Rise. Journal of Financial Economics [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304405X19300807
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Homes exposed to sea level rise (SLR) sell for approximately 7% less than observably equivalent unexposed properties equidistant from the beach. This discount has grown over time and is driven by sophisticated buyers and communities worried about global warming. Consistent with causal identification of long-horizon SLR costs, we find no relation between SLR exposure and rental rates and a 4% discount among properties not projected to be flooded for almost a century. Our findings contribute to the literature on the pricing of long-run risky cash flows and provide insights for optimal climate change policy.

Dual wave farms for energy production and coastal protection under sea level rise

Rodriguez-Delgado C, Bergillos RJ, Iglesias G. Dual wave farms for energy production and coastal protection under sea level rise. Journal of Cleaner Production [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959652619307474
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Climate change is poised to exacerbate coastal erosion. Recent research has presented a novel strategy to tackle this issue: dual wave farms, i.e., arrays of wave energy converters with the dual function of carbon-free energy generation and coastal erosion mitigation. However, the implications of sea level rise – another consequence of climate change – for the effectiveness of wave farms as coastal defence elements against shoreline erosion have not been studied so far. The objective of this work is to investigate how the coastal defence performance of a dual wave farm is affected by sea level rise through a case study (Playa Granada, southern Iberian Peninsula). To this end, a spectral wave propagation model, a longshore sediment transport formulation and a one-line model are combined to obtain the final subaerial beach areas for three sea level rise scenarios: the present situation, an optimistic and a pessimistic projection. These scenarios were modelled with and without the wave farm to assess its effects. We find that the dual wave farm reduces erosion and promotes accretion regardless of the sea level rise scenario considered. In the case of westerly storms, the dual wave farm is particularly effective: erosion is transformed into accretion. In general, and importantly, sea level rise strengthens the effectiveness of the dual wave farm as a coastal protection mechanism. This fact enhances the competitiveness of wave farms as coastal defence elements.

Coastal flooding from wave overtopping and sea level rise adaptation in the northeastern USA

Xie D, Zou Q-P, Mignone A, MacRae JD. Coastal flooding from wave overtopping and sea level rise adaptation in the northeastern USA. Coastal Engineering [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378383917305653
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

In the northeastern United States, flooding arising from wave overtopping poses a constant threat to coastal communities during storm events. The purpose of this study is to construct a novel integrated atmosphere-ocean-coast modeling framework based on the coupled tide, surge and wave model, ADCIRC-SWAN, to assess risk and facilitate coastal adaptation and resilience to flooding in a changing climate in this region. The integrated modeling system was validated against the field observations of water level, wave height and period during the January 2015 North American blizzard. Water level measurements by a sensor in the Avenues Basin behind the Seawall in Scituate, Massachusetts were combined with the basin volume determined by the USGS LIDAR data to verify the model predictions of wave overtopping volume. At the storm peak, the significant wave height was increased by 0.7 m at the coast by tide and surge. The wave setup along the coast varied from 0.1 m to 0.25 m depending on the coastline geometry. The interaction between tide-surge and waves increased the wave overtopping rate by five folds mainly due to increased wave height at the toe of the seawall. The wave overtopping discharge would approximately double in an intermediate sea level rise scenario of 0.36 m by 2050 for a storm like the January 2015 North American blizzard. The wave overtopping discharge would increase by 1.5 times if the seawall crest elevation was raised by the same amount as sea level rise. An increase of 0.9 m in the seawall crest elevation is required to bring the wave overtopping discharge to the current level under a 0.36 m sea level rise scenario, primarily due to larger waves arriving at the seawall without breaking in the presence of larger water depth.

Assessing Beach and Dune Erosion and Vulnerability Under Sea Level Rise: A Case Study in the Mediterranean Sea

Enríquez AR, Marcos M, Falqués A, Roelvink D. Assessing Beach and Dune Erosion and Vulnerability Under Sea Level Rise: A Case Study in the Mediterranean Sea. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00004/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In this study, we estimate the shoreline retreat, the vulnerability and the erosion rates of an open beach-dune system under projected sea level rise (SLR) and the action of wind-waves (separately and in combination). The methodology is based on the combination of two state-of-the-art numerical models (XBeach and Q2D-morfo) applied in a probabilistic framework and it is implemented in an open sandy beach in Menorca Island (Western Mediterranean). We compute the shoreline response to SLR during the 21st century and we assess the changing impacts of storm waves on the aerial beach-dune system. Results demonstrate the relevant role that the beach backshore features, such as the berm, play as coastal defense, reducing the shoreline retreat and dune vulnerability rates in the near-term (a few decades ahead) and highlighting the importance of simulating the beach morphodynamic processes in coastal impacts assessments. Our findings point at SLR as the major driver of the projected impacts over the beach-dune system, leading to an increase of ∼25% of the volume eroded due to storm waves by the end of the century with respect to present-day conditions.

Coastal adaptation laws and the social justice of policies to address sea level rise: An Indonesian insight

Nurhidayah L, McIlgorm A. Coastal adaptation laws and the social justice of policies to address sea level rise: An Indonesian insight. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2019 ;171:11 - 18. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569118301340
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Climate change and sea level rise (SLR) poses serious risks to coastal communities around the world requiring nations to apply adaptation laws and policies. Climate change will exacerbate the existing threats to vulnerable communities, such as the poor, and threaten the food security of populations in coastal areas through the effects of flooding due to coastal inundation. Indonesia is an Archipelagic State of over 17,000 islands and is vulnerable to climate change impacts in its coastal areas and especially in its highly populated low lying delta areas, such as Jakarta and Semarang, where vulnerability to sea level rise is evident. The adequacy of the legal adaptation framework in Indonesia to respond to this climate vulnerability is assessed and it is found to have limited consideration of the community burden arising from these climate and SLR uncertainties. A more inclusive social justice approach could assist government to respond to the impacts from these issues and to their implications for vulnerable groups. The nation can improve adaptive legal measures to address climate change impacts and increase the involvement of local people in climate change adaptation decision making. Funding is required to assist policy makers to further incorporate adaptation into decision making, and this could improve social justice outcomes for vulnerable Indonesian coastal communities.

The effects of mean sea level rise and strengthened winds on extreme sea levels in the Baltic Sea

Hieronymus M, Dieterich C, Andersson H, Hordoir R. The effects of mean sea level rise and strengthened winds on extreme sea levels in the Baltic Sea. Theoretical and Applied Mechanics Letters [Internet]. 2018 ;8(6):366 - 371. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2095034918302083
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Mean sea level rise and climatological wind speed changes occur as part of the ongoing climate change and future projections of both variables are still highly uncertain. Here the Baltic Sea's response in extreme sea levels to perturbations in mean sea level and wind speeds is investigated in a series of simulations with a newly developed storm surge model based on the nucleus for European modeling of the ocean (NEMO)-Nordic. A simple linear model with only two tunable parameters is found to capture the changes in the return levels extremely well. The response to mean sea level rise is linear and nearly spatially uniform, meaning that a mean sea level rise of 1 m increases the return levels by a equal amount everywhere. The response to wind speed perturbations is more complicated and return levels are found to increase more where they are already high. This behaviour is alarming as it suggests that already flooding prone regions like the Gulf of Finland will be disproportionally adversely affected in a future windier climate.

Adaptation to sea level rise on low coral islands: Lessons from recent events

Esteban M, Jamero MLaurice, Nurse L, Yamamoto L, Takagi H, Thao NDanh, Mikami T, Kench P, Onuki M, Nellas A, et al. Adaptation to sea level rise on low coral islands: Lessons from recent events. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2019 ;168:35 - 40. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569118300826
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

In the past two decades there have been fears that many low-lying atoll islands around the world could disappear as a consequence of climate change and sea level rise, leading to mass migration and threatening the existence of several island nations. Here we show how sea level rise does not inevitably lead to coastal areas becoming uninhabitable, and that humans have an innate and often underestimated capacity to adapt to changes in their environment. To do so we showcase three instances of human- and earthquake-induced land subsidence that have taken place in the 21st century, where the coastal/island areas are still inhabited despite the challenge of living with higher water levels: the Tohoku coastline following the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami (subsidence ∼0.4–1.0 m), the present day situation of coastal areas in Jakarta due to ground water extraction (>5.0 m), and the islands of Tubigon, Bohol in central Philippines after the 2013 Bohol Earthquake (∼1.0 m). Humans are able to adapt and arrive at solutions even when confronted with cases of rapid rises in water levels, and thus it is likely that in the future vulnerable coastlines will be engineered and largely remain at present day locations, particularly in densely populated areas. If anything, around densely populated areas it is more likely that humans will continue to encroach on the sea rather than the reverse. We caution, however, that small islands are not homogeneous, and many are unlikely to respond to rising sea levels in the manner that atolls do (in fact, many might just resort to build at higher elevations). Where engineering and other adaptation responses become necessary, the financial and human resource requirements may well be beyond capacity of some small islands, which could lead to impoverishment and associated challenges in many communities.

Wave farm impacts on coastal flooding under sea-level rise: a case study in southern Spain

Bergillos RJ, Rodriguez-Delgado C, Iglesias G. Wave farm impacts on coastal flooding under sea-level rise: a case study in southern Spain. Science of The Total Environment [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969718343213
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

Coastal flooding, already an acute problem in many parts of the world, will be exacerbated in the near future by the sea level rise induced by climate change. The influence of wave farms, i.e., arrays of wave energy converters, on coastal processes, in particular sediment transport patterns, has been analysed in recent works; however, their influence on coastal flooding has not been addressed so far. The objective of this work is to investigate whether a wave farm can provide some protection from flooding on the coast in its lee through a case study: a gravel-dominated beach in southern Spain (Playa Granada). We consider three sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios: the present situation (SLR0), an optimistic projection (SLR1) and a pessimistic projection (SLR2). Two state-of-the-art numerical models, SWAN and XBeach-G, are applied to determine the wave propagation patterns, total run-up and flooded dry beach area. The results indicate that the absorption of wave power by the wave farm affects wave propagation in its lee and, in particular, wave heights, with alongshore-averaged reductions in breaking wave heights about 10% (25%) under westerly (easterly) storms. These lower significant wave heights, in turn, result in alongshore-averaged run-up reductions for the three scenarios, which decreases with increasing SLR values from 5.9% (6.8%) to 1.5% (5.1%) for western (eastern) storms. Importantly, the dry beach area flooded under westerly (easterly) storms is also reduced by 5.7% (3.2%), 3.3% (4.9%) and 1.99% (4.5%) in scenarios SLR0, SLR1 and SLR2, respectively. These findings prove that a wave farm can actually reduce coastal flooding on its leeward coast.

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