OpenChannels News

MPA News

UK environment secretary calls for 30% of world ocean in MPAs by 2030

On 24 September, UK Environment Secretary Michael Gove called for 30% of the world ocean to be protected by 2030. The goal echoes the 30%-by-2030 target set by IUCN members two years ago. But it is rare for a politician to champion the goal specifically, particularly as most nations are still working to meet the 10%-by-2020 target for MPA coverage under Aichi Target 11. Gove’s announcement was made in New York City to coincide with the current session of the United Nations General Assembly. A UK Government press release is here. A UN Environment news article on Gove’s call is here.

OC Overview
Posted on September 24, 2018 - 12:41pm, by raye

How reliable are turtles for measuring ocean trash and marine health?

Sea turtles are widespread through the ocean. They are one of the most photographed, as well, when it comes to marine debris and plastic pollution. With snouts closed shut with plastic can holders, and stomachs full of debris, it seems that turtles and marine plastics almost go hand and hand. The question is how well could scientists use turtles as an indicator for ocean health? (via phys.org)

OC Overview
Posted on September 18, 2018 - 9:11am, by raye

New Genetic Research Shows the Legacy of Fish Farm Escapees

New tests have discovered interbreeding between escaped farm salmon and native salmon stocks in Newfoundland due to the 2013 Cooke Aquaculture pen collapse in that area. This was not the first, nor the last of pen collapses for Cooke Aquaculture. During the summer of 2017, where over 260,000 farmed salmon escaped into Puget Sound, Cooke stated that survival of the escaped fish was low and interbreeding was impossible. The same statements were given in 2013. Obviously those fish did survive and found a way to flourish. (via Hakai Magazine)

The Skimmer on Marine Ecosystems and Management

"If the last blue whale choked to death on the last panda, it would be disastrous but not the end of the world. But if we accidentally poisoned the last two species of ammonia-oxidizers, that would be another matter. It could be happening now and we wouldn't even know..."
                                  ---
Microbiologist Tom Curtis in Nature, 2006

Most marine microbes are marine organisms too small to be seen by the unaided human eye (that is, roughly less than 0.1 mm). They make up 98 percent of ocean biomass, are the foundation of all marine food webs, and are a major driver of most of Earth’s biogeochemical cycles, including those of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and phosphorus (not to mention those of sulfur, hydrogen, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, and chlorine).

The Skimmer on Marine Ecosystems and Management

Editor's note: The goal of The EBM Toolbox is to promote awareness of tools and methods for facilitating EBM and MSP processes. It is brought to you by the EBM Tools Network (www.ebmtools.org), a voluntary alliance of tool users, developers, and training providers.

In 2016, the EBM Tools Network compiled a list of hands-on activities for teaching about ecosystem services and ecosystem-based management (now updated with several more activities!). A university professor recently asked if we have any similar resources for teaching marine protected area (MPA) design and management. EBM Tools Network members pooled their collective knowledge again and came up with this fantastic list of resources for teaching about MPAs at all educational levels.

The Skimmer on Marine Ecosystems and Management

The last two issues of MEAM featured two Skimmers chock full of cutting edge research and insights from some of our climate change researcher heroes. If you didn’t have a chance to check them out yet, we highly recommend doing so now!

OC Overview
Posted on September 10, 2018 - 8:50am, by raye

The United Nations Is Considering Banning High-Seas Fishing

In a recent study, published through Science Advances, researchers try to determine how influential high sea fisheries are for global supplies. The results show that the answer is very little. Another question to ask though is “how important is the high seas for the overall health of global fish stocks?” (via Hakai Magazine)

OC Overview
Posted on September 4, 2018 - 9:19am, by raye

Hundreds of Researchers From Harvard, Yale and Stanford Were Published in Fake Academic Journals

An undercover study, performed by a German team led by journalist Silvia Eckert, discovered that hundreds of papers were submitted to predatory journals by real researchers from prominent institutions. These journals go on to create fake conferences with “experts” to draw in millions of dollars. One plausible explanation for these researchers to submit to these inauthentic journals is purely to say they were published. ( via Motherboard)

Pages