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The concept that no-take marine reserves can benefit nearby fisheries by supplying them with larvae and adult fish is central to reserves' potential role in fisheries management. According to the theory of the reserve effect, fish that are protected inside reserves live to maturity and reproduce, and some of the young and/or adults cross the reserve boundary into unprotected waters. There they can be caught by fishers. Much of the attraction of the reserve effect is that it offers benefits both for conservation and fisheries.

MPA News

Our November-December 2009 article on seismic surveys and MPAs resulted in several letters from readers (MPA News 11:3). The article highlighted a case involving Canada's Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area, where an academic research team sought to conduct a seismic survey to study the seabed and plate tectonics of the region. A legal challenge by conservation organizations attempted to block the study, arguing that its noise would harm marine mammals.

MPA News

Leading up to last December's UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, a variety of institutions published reports on the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of climate change, as well as strategies for addressing those impacts. A list of (mostly) new publications is below, adapted from one published last month by Marine Ecosystems and Management (www.MEAM.net), the sister newsletter of MPA News. Although not all of these publications and other resources focus specifically on MPAs, their lessons are applicable to the MPA field.

MPA News

Correction

Due to an editorial error, the name of the Swiss watch manufacturer Jaeger-LeCoultre was misspelled in our November-December 2009 issue. As mentioned in the article "New Coordinator of World Heritage Marine Programme Describes Plan Forward", Jaeger-LeCoultre is providing financial support to the UNESCO World Heritage Marine Programme.

MPA News

The LMMA Network is a group of practitioners - including traditional leaders, conservation staff, university researchers, and others - working to improve locally-managed marine areas in the Indo-Pacific through the sharing of experiences and resources (www.lmmanetwork.org). The Network recently released The LMMA Network Community Storybook featuring lessons and experiences gathered at a network-wide meeting held in November 2008.

The Skimmer on Marine Ecosystems and Management

In the months that led up to December's UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, reports forecasting the environmental and socio-economic impacts to come from climate change were sobering. The future for our coasts and oceans? Rising sea levels and coastal flooding. Increased acidification of seawater. Coral bleaching. Poleward shifts in ocean habitats and species ranges. Conceivably, a hundred years from now, our coasts and oceans could look quite different from today.

The Skimmer on Marine Ecosystems and Management

By Tundi Agardy, MEAM Contributing Editor. E-mail: tundiagardy [at] earthlink.net

Climate change may change everything, even in the vast and resilient global ocean. How can managers be proactive about climate-induced changes? What kinds of information do they need? How can they work around (or with) the substantial uncertainties that surround how ecosystems will respond, and at what rates?

The Skimmer on Marine Ecosystems and Management

Marine spatial planning (MSP) aims to organize the use of marine space in a way that balances demands for development with the need to protect ocean ecosystems. By allocating specific human activities to particular areas, MSP can help reduce user conflicts (when there is spatial overlap among uses) as well as conflicts between uses and important natural areas.

The Skimmer on Marine Ecosystems and Management

Editor's note: The goal of The EBM Toolbox is to promote awareness of tools for facilitating EBM processes. It is brought to you by the EBM Tools Network (www.ebmtools.org), a voluntary alliance of tool users, developers, and training providers.

By Sarah Carr

Monitoring a variety of ecological and socioeconomic indicators is essential to planning and measuring the effectiveness of EBM. Some useful tools exist to help develop monitoring plans, including:

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