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MPA News

By Jon Day

The Representative Areas Program (RAP), which rezoned the entire Great Barrier Reef Marine Park in a single planning initiative, was at the time the most comprehensive process of community involvement and participatory planning for any environmental issue in Australia. The outcome was that one-third of the Marine Park was declared as highly protected no-take zones in 2004, with the remainder of the park also zoned to provide various levels of protection.

Many of the lessons learned from RAP remain relevant today. The following 25 lessons are excerpted from a paper published in Coastal Management journal in December 2017, “Effective public participation is fundamental for marine conservation – lessons from a large scale MPA”. The paper is available for free here. More detail on each of the lessons is in the paper.

MPA News

In a move that has been in the making for the past five years, the Australian government formally announced its plans in March 2018 to scale back protections for the nation’s system of marine parks. Overall, 80% of Australia’s marine park waters will now be open to commercial fishing, up from 63% under the system’s original design. And 97% of Commonwealth waters within 100 km of the coast will be open to recreational fishing.

MPA News

By Rene A. Abesamis, Silliman University - Angelo King Center for Research and Environmental Management

Knowing how far the larvae of fish species disperse can be invaluable to designing effective networks of MPAs. But in a developing nation like the Philippines, where over 1000 community-managed MPAs have been established over the past two decades, such science is often not available, particularly at the community level. So planners have often made educated guesses when planning their MPAs, based on traditional knowledge and what science could be accessed.

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 10, 2018 - 3:24pm, by nwehner
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Via The Pilot

"The panel will be co-chaired by Mary Simon and Rémi Bujold. Panel members are David Anderson, Darcy Dobell, Tom Hayes, Marc Léger, and Chief Maureen Thomas, Tsleil-Waututh Nation. They will meet in person across the country over the next few months and will seek perspectives from provinces and territories, Indigenous peoples, stakeholders, experts and the public."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 10, 2018 - 3:14pm, by nwehner
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Via The Jakarta Post

"The stateless fish-poaching boat had 20 crew members onboard, 14 of which are Indonesian while the remaining six are Russian. The vessel was equipped with 600 sets of gill nets. Each gill net is 50 meters long, indicating that the ship has the capacity to sweep up to 30 square kilometers in the water."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 10, 2018 - 3:06pm, by nwehner

Via The Conversation

"For fish, whales and other marine animals, intense underwater noises from blasts can cause acoustic trauma and even death. More common quieter noise, such as construction or shipping noise, may not kill the animals directly, but can disrupt their ability to find food, mates or avoid predators."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 10, 2018 - 10:08am, by nwehner

Via Anthropocene

"Take, for example, coastal Massachusetts, where commercial fishing and whalewatching are widely recognized as vital to the regional economy. In 2014, revenues from those activities respectively totaled $105 million and $111 million. When researchers calculated the value of marine stewardship in the region, the economic output totaled $179 million. It’s a whopping contribution, but largely ignored in the way nature is perceived and managed in the region."

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