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Posted on November 14, 2017 - 2:23pm, by raye
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Via The Pardee Periodical: Journal of Global Affairs

"Terrestrial systems have long been the favored child in conservation campaigns and climate policy. This bias is understandable – humans live on land, not in the sea; and what is out of sight is out of mind. However, while we do not immediately think of the oceans as sustaining human society, we have benefited from their services through things such as food supply and climate regulation. Today, marine systems around the world are on the brink of collapse, facing decline from traditional human stressors such as over-fishing and pollution. Unless we act fast, climate change will be the proverbial straw."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on November 14, 2017 - 2:07pm, by raye

Via Gizmodo

"Despite both the economic and obvious environmental benefits to keeping it in tip-top shape, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's second World Heritage Outlook report confirmed the Reef is at a "very high level of threat" from climate change and there is "real concern" that its condition is deteriorating."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on November 14, 2017 - 1:56pm, by raye
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Via NRDC

"On Thursday, the House Natural Resources Committee passed a bill, called the “SECURE American Energy Act” (H.R. 4239), that can only be described as an oil industry wish-list. The bill’s purpose is to mow down environmental concerns that stand in the way of the complete exploitation of fossil fuels in this country. For the oceans, this would mean an end to national monument designation and to some of those pesky safety regulations that were put in place after the Deepwater spill, among other things. And although it hasn’t received much attention—yet—one late addition to the bill targets marine mammals in a very big way."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on November 13, 2017 - 3:05pm, by nwehner

Via The New York Times

"Long the stuff of science fiction, so-called “seasteading” has in recent years matured from pure fantasy into something approaching reality, and there are now companies, academics, architects and even a government working together on a prototype by 2020."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on November 13, 2017 - 3:01pm, by nwehner

Via The Washington Post

"New Jersey residents just elected a Democrat to replace Christie — one with an ambitious alternative energy plan. One of the biggest energy-related consequences of the 2017 election is the gust of life breathed into offshore wind development in the densely populated and energy-hungry Garden State."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on November 13, 2017 - 10:53am, by raye
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Via United Nations: Climate Change 

"[At] the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP23), the World Health Organization, in collaboration with the UN Climate Change secretariat and in partnership with the Fijian Presidency of the twenty-third Conference of the Parties (COP23), has launched a special initiative to protect people living in Small Island Developing States from the heath impacts of climate change."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on November 13, 2017 - 9:41am, by raye

Via BusinessMirror

"Conservation advocates in the Philippines have reasons to celebrate these days. They considered the recent listing of the five endangered migratory species in the appendices of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS), also called Bonn Convention, as a big step toward their protection and conservation throughout their migratory routes or range."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on November 12, 2017 - 4:47pm, by abrown
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Via Science

The rescue operation to save the Vaquita has been called off after the death of one that was captured. Instead the rescue team is focusing on capturing detailed photographs of the last few remaining animals to help keep track of them as individuals. 

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on November 12, 2017 - 4:32pm, by abrown

Via Oceans Deeply

"Most of the planet’s coastlines are in the developing world. Western marine scientists and institutions could do better work by developing the scientific talents of the people who live there, says Asha de Vos, founder of Oceanswell."

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