News and Updates

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on July 19, 2017 - 10:10am, by nwehner
Tags: 

Via The Washington Post

"Three days before the tech leader’s July 15 visit to Glacier, research ecologist Daniel Fagre said he was told that his scheduled tour with Zuckerberg of Logan Pass on the Continental Divide was off."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on July 19, 2017 - 7:03am, by CCRN

Friday, July 21st at 12:00 noon, Eastern Daylight Time (9 am PDT; 1 pm ADT; 4 pm UTC).

Inuit art reflects a cultural response to shifting sea ice and climate change. The Inuit people are tightly linked to ecological systems that include both land and sea. Vital as they are to community well-being, both land and sea ice are changing rapidly due to global climate change. Conservation efforts see the importance of both the unique arctic sea ice and tundra as ecological systems, and  the important ecological knowledge carried for millennia by the Indigenous people of Canada’s north.  In this webinar, I present recent research that links Inuit art with community conservation and resilience.  I unpack how different artistic practices, and art objects, can make significant contributions to conservation practice in these communities. Art making occurs both individually and collaboratively in Inuit communities. Art objects can travel between social worlds to influence governance and policy outcomes beyond the community of production. Inuit artists intentionally embed their traditional and ecological knowledge into their works. In this way, art functions as storage and maintenance of knowledge, and as mechanisms for social cohesion by connecting this knowledge amongst generations. When used strategically, art and artistic processes can contribute to conservation policy and practice by generating novel insights about places, and by revealing community outlook and priorities. 

Community Updates - External Link

This one day conference, taking place in Southampton on 22 August 2017,  will present the latest thinking on how natural capital accounting is seen, in some quarters at least, as the way forward for effective biodiversity conservation policy and delivery. Speakers will include government advisers, economists, NGOs, local authority representatives and businesses who will each examine the natural capital approach from their perspective and describe its potential to help address the environmental challenges we face. Delegates will also have the opportunity to consider ‘”so what”? for practitioners, by exploring the implications for professional practice going forwards.

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on July 18, 2017 - 12:04pm, by abrown
Tags: 

Via The Washington Post

"Interstate fishing managers say a row with an appointee of President Donald Trump’s administration over the regulation of flounder fishing off New Jersey jeopardizes conservation of marine species all along the East Coast."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on July 18, 2017 - 11:49am, by abrown

Via Phys.org

"Just as one too many cocktails can lead a person to make bad choices, a few drops of oil can cause coral reef fish to make poor decisions, according to a paper published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on July 18, 2017 - 11:42am, by abrown

Via The San Diego Union-Tribune

"The international conservation group Oceana has filed a federal lawsuit challenging a decision by federal fisheries regulators to pull proposed protections for whales, sea turtles and dolphins at risk of dying in swordfishing nets off California."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on July 18, 2017 - 11:36am, by abrown

Via Marine Link

"A new study seeks to determine the extent to which biofouling on ships’ hulls is contributing to the spread of invasive aquatic species in the Mediterranean Sea – a phenomenon commonly associated with ship ballasting operations."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on July 18, 2017 - 11:30am, by abrown

Via Phys.org

"An international group has taken a close look at how different types of bottom trawling affect the seabed. It finds that all trawling is not created equal—the most benign type removes 6 percent of the animal and plant life on the seabed each time the net passes, while the most other methods remove closer to a third."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on July 18, 2017 - 8:51am, by abrown

Via Phys.org

"Invasive plant species can be a source of valuable ecosystem functions where native coastal habitats such as salt marshes and oyster reefs have severely declined, a new study by scientists at Duke University and the University of North Carolina-Wilmington finds."

Pages