Societal causes of, and responses to, ocean acidification

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For the week of 19 November 2018

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Ambio has published, Societal causes of, and responses to, ocean acidification. "Major climate and ecological changes affect the world’s oceans leading to a number of responses including increasing water temperatures, changing weather patterns, shrinking ice-sheets, temperature-driven shifts in marine species ranges, biodiversity loss and bleaching of coral reefs. In addition, ocean pH is falling, a process known as ocean acidification (OA). The root cause of OA lies in human policies and behaviours driving society’s dependence on fossil fuels, resulting in elevated CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. In this review, we detail the state of knowledge of the causes of, and potential responses to, OA with particular focus on Swedish coastal seas. We also discuss present knowledge gaps and implementation needs."

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let us know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email Allie directly at abrown [at] openchannels.org.

You can read everything (not just the free stuff) we have found this week at https://www.openchannels.org/literature-update/2018-11-21. Additionally, you can browse literature by the week we've added it at https://www.openchannels.org/literature-by-week.

Thank you for being part of the OpenChannels Community,
– Allie Brown, Raye Evrard, and the rest of the OpenChannels Team

P.S. SURVEY EXTENDED! For all you who haven't gotten the chance, the OCTO survey will now close November 30th. Please follow this link to get to the survey. Thank you very much!   

Aquaculture, Seafood, and Food Security

OA: Marín, A. et al. A glimpse into the genetic diversity of the Peruvian seafood sector: Unveiling species substitution, mislabeling and trade of threatened species. PLOS ONE 13, e0206596 (2018).

OA: Warner, K. A., Lowell, B., Timme, W., Shaftel, E. & Hanner, R. H. Seafood sleuthing: How citizen science contributed to the largest market study of seafood mislabeling in the U.S. and informed policy. Marine Policy 99, 304 - 311 (2019).

Biodiversity

OA: Lundmark, C., Sandström, A., Andersson, K. & Laikre, L. Monitoring the effects of knowledge communication on conservation managers’ perception of genetic biodiversity – A case study from the Baltic Sea. Marine Policy 99, 223 - 229 (2019).

Climate Change, Ocean Acidification, and Ocean Warming

OA: Jagers, S. C. et al. Societal causes of, and responses to, ocean acidification. Ambio (2018). doi:10.1007/s13280-018-1103-2

Economics

OA: Tietze, U. & Van Anrooy, R. Assessment of insurance needs and opportunities in the Caribbean fisheries sector. FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Circular (FAO, 2018). doi:10.31230/osf.io/4pk6e

Fisheries and Fisheries Management

OA: Cashion, T. et al. Establishing company level fishing revenue and profit losses from fisheries: A bottom-up approach. PLOS ONE 13, e0207768 (2018).

Natural Sciences

OA: Goldstein, M. A. et al. The step-like evolution of Arctic open water. Scientific Reports 8, (2018).