OpenChannels Literature Update Archives

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The Potential for Using Invasive Zebra Mussel Biomass as a Supplement to Commercial Chicken Feed

For the week of 6 October 2014

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

There's a new thought-provoking article out from Environmental Management entitled, Making the Best of a Pest: The Potential for Using Invasive Zebra Mussel (Dreissena Polymorpha) Biomass as a Supplement to Commercial Chicken Feed. The authors fed ground dried zebra mussels to chickens for 14 days, showing that indeed the birds would eat such a supplement. Protein and caloric levels were lower than expected, however. You may read the full-text for free using the link below.

Happy reading!
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Assessing Social – Ecological Trade-Offs to Advance Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management

For the week of 29 September 2014

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

I am pleased to announce that we're in the process of overhauling the Literature Library in an effort to provide integration with bibliographic and citation systems such as Mendeley, Zotero, and BibTex. I hope you like it! You'll notice a few of the latest literature items below utilize the new and improved format.

A few things to note regarding the Literature Library during the transition:

  • The literature library has moved to http://openchannels.org/literature.
  • Old items will be accessible via the openchannels.org/literature-library/ nomenclature until they are migrated.
  • If you subscribe to the Literature Library's RSS feed, be sure to update the URL to http://openchannels.org/literature/rss.
  • Email notifications of new literature items are not available right now, but they will be when the migration is complete (otherwise, you'd get alerts for all 3200+ titles as we migrate them - and I'm sure you don't want that!).
  • If you have any questions, don't hesitate to contact me at nwehner [at] openchannels.org

Now, the updates: new from PLoS ONE comes, Assessing Social – Ecological Trade-Offs to Advance Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management. The authors utilized an "optimization model to address the actual fisheries management challenge of trading-off the recovery of collapsed cod stocks versus the health of ecologically important forage fish populations." You may access the full-text for free using the link below.

Happy reading!
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Maps, laws and planning policy: Working with biophysical and spatial uncertainty in the case of sea level rise

For the week of 22 September 2014

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Environmental Science & Policy has published, Maps, laws and planning policy: Working with biophysical and spatial uncertainty in the case of sea level rise. The authors used Queensland, Australia as a case study for coastal zone planning with sea-level rise. Eight factors were found to provide notable challenges in regard to "errors, uncertainties and variability in physical, geographical and biological processes." You may access the full-text for free using the link below.

Happy reading!
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Mapping seabird sensitivity to offshore wind farms

For the week of 15 September 2014

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

PLoS ONE has now published, Mapping seabird sensitivity to offshore wind farms, in which the authors utilized GIS with the Seabird Mapping and Sensitivity Tool (SeaMaST) to examine seabirds interacting with wind farms in England's seas. Seabird surveys from 1979-2012 were used in the analysis to produce sensitivity maps to aid maritime spatial planning on both collision and displacement effects. You may download the full-text for free using the link below.

Happy reading!
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Cumulative Effects in Marine Ecosystems: Scientific Perspectives on its Challenges and Solutions

For the weeks of of 25 August through 8 September 2014

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

The Literature Update is now back from its summer holiday with long distance eyesight is restored. We have 2.5 Literature Updates in this one issue, so get ready for lots of interesting things to read this week.

The Center for Ocean Solutions and friends have produced a new report, Cumulative Effects in Marine Ecosystems: Scientific Perspectives on its Challenges and Solutions. The report examines: "(1) how cumulative effects manifest in ecosystems as a result of multiple human activities; (2) challenges in applying scientific knowledge in cumulative effects assessment, including defining spatial and temporal scales, baselines, reference points, indicators, and identifying significant changes in the face of uncertainty and natural environmental variability; (3) models and tools that have been developed to assess cumulative effects; and (4) priorities for science and management of cumulative effects." You may download the full-text using the link below.

Happy reading!
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

The Crowded Sea: Incorporating Multiple Marine Activities in Conservation Plans Can Significantly Alter Spatial Priorities

For the week of 20 August 2014

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

PLoS ONE has published, The Crowded Sea: Incorporating Multiple Marine Activities in Conservation Plans Can Significantly Alter Spatial Priorities. Mazor, Possingham, and co-authors examined the Mediterranean territorial waters of Israel to compare four management scenarios as additional use-cases were incorporated. They illustrated the complexity of spatial planning processes, including opportunity costs, lost fishing effort, and lost revenues. You may access the full-text for free using the link below.

Happy reading!
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Transforming management of tropical coastal seas to cope with challenges of the 21st century

For the week of 11 August 2014

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

New from Marine Pollution Bulletin comes the open access paper, Transforming management of tropical coastal seas to cope with challenges of the 21st century. Many of the leading scientists in our field offer a sobering view of status quo marine management in this paper, by examining demographic data along the planet's coasts and the growing human impacts associated with growing coastal populations. Expanded marine spatial planning is offered as a potential lifeline. You may access the full-text for free using the link below.

Happy reading!
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Ecosystem and Community-Based Model Integration to Designate Coral Reef No-Take MPAs: A Case Study

For the week of 4 August 2014

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Natural Resources has published, Ecosystem-Based and Community-Based Model Integration to Designate Coral Reef No-Take Marine Protected Areas: A Case Study from Puerto Rico. The authors used a participatory model with both physical and socioeconomic values to identify candidate MPAs. Stakeholders in the study area had accurate perceptions of coral reef health, but did not realize the threats of climate change. This participatory-modeled MPA won approval from 80% of artisanal fishers, highlighting the importance of community involvement. You may download the full-text article for free using the link below.

Happy reading!
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

How Can We Identify and Communicate the Ecological Value of Deep-Sea Ecosystem Services?

For the week of 28 June 2014

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

New from PLoS ONE comes, How Can We Identify and Communicate the Ecological Value of Deep-Sea Ecosystem Services? The authors utilized the Ecosystem Principles Approach to identify ecosystem services of submarine canyons. The approach was found to be successful in linking ecological information with ecosystem service assessment, which could also make it a useful basis for communication practices. You may download the full-text PDF for free using the link below.

Happy reading!
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Sediment and Turbidity Associated with Offshore Dredging Increase Coral Disease Prevalence on Nearby Reefs

For the week of 21 July 2014

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Monday evening we unveiled OpenChannels version 3.0 which unifies your browsing experience across mobile and desktop devices. Reading literature no longer requires super-small text or lots of zooming and dragging. We hope you find this update as useful as we do. If you find any gremlins wreaking havoc, do let us know - you can simply reply to this message (we may have fed the Mogwai after dark...).

Bad puns aside, it's time for the literature! PLoS ONE has published a new paper, Sediment and Turbidity Associated with Offshore Dredging Increase Coral Disease Prevalence on Nearby Reefs. The authors found a six-fold increase in "signs of compromised coral health" due to exposure from dredging plumes. I'm sure you all know what this means for the whole Australia coal export issue...

Happy reading!
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

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