OpenChannels Literature Update Archives

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Conservation Outreach Manual: Tips for Building Public Awareness

For the week of 20 November 2017

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

The Nature Conservancy has published, Conservation Outreach Manual: Tips for Building Public Awareness. "This manual is intended to help marine resource managers, agencies and organizations plan impactful awareness activities. It provides an overview of key concepts in communications, with examples to guide the reader through the development and implementation of community outreach programs"

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let us know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email Allie directly at abrown [at] openchannels.org.

You can read everything (not just the free stuff) we have found this week at https://www.openchannels.org/literature-update/2017-11-22. Additionally, you can browse literature by the week we've added it at https://www.openchannels.org/literature-by-week.

Happy reading,
-Allie Brown and Raye Evrard

Marine resource management and conservation in the Anthropocene

For the week of 13 November 2017

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Environmental Conservation has published, Marine resource management and conservation in the Anthropocene. "Because the Anthropocene by definition is an epoch during which environmental change is largely anthropogenic and driven by social, economic, psychological and political forces, environmental social scientists can effectively analyse human behaviour and knowledge systems in this context. In this subject review, we summarize key ways in which the environmental social sciences can better inform fisheries management policy and practice and marine conservation in the Anthropocene."

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let us know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email Allie directly at abrown [at] openchannels.org.

You can read everything (not just the free stuff) we have found this week at https://www.openchannels.org/literature-update/2017-11-15. Additionally, you can browse literature by the week we've added it at https://www.openchannels.org/literature-by-week.

Happy reading,
-Allie Brown, Raye Evrard, and Nick Wehner

Incorporating ecological functions in conservation decision making

For the week of 6 November 2017

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Ecology and Evolution has published, Incorporating ecological functions in conservation decision making. "We demonstrate the benefits of this approach using fish data from Europe's second largest river, the Danube. Our results show that adding trophic information leads to a different spatial configuration of priority areas at no additional cost. This can enhance identification of priority refugia for species in the lower position of the trophic web while simultaneously identifying areas that represent a more diverse species pool."

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let us know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email Allie directly at abrown [at] openchannels.org.

You can read everything (not just the free stuff) we have found this week at https://www.openchannels.org/literature-update/2017-11-08. Additionally, you can browse literature by the week we've added it at https://www.openchannels.org/literature-by-week.

PS: We're launching MarXiv, the (free!) research repository for ocean and climate science next week! Join us for an introductory training on Making Your Research Freely-Available with MarXiv on Tuesday, November 14 at 10am Pacific / 1pm Eastern / 6pm UTC. For more information and to register, visit https://oct.to/MarXivIntro.

Happy reading,
-Allie Brown, Raye Evrard, and Nick Wehner

Prior predation alters community resistance to an extreme climate disturbance

For the week of 30 October 2017

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Ecosphere has published, Prior predation alters community resistance to an extreme climate disturbance. "Here we use replicate communities of tropical, sessile invertebrates to ask whether fish predation during initial assembly (before) and recovery (after) influences community resistance to a hurricane-level low-salinity event. Results revealed that pre-event predation determined whether communities shifted in biomass and community structure following disturbance."

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let us know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email Allie directly at abrown [at] openchannels.org.

You can read everything (not just the free stuff) we have found this week at https://www.openchannels.org/literature-update/2017-11-01. Additionally, you can browse literature by the week we've added it at https://www.openchannels.org/literature-by-week.

Happy reading,
-Allie Brown, Andrew Lewin, and Nick Wehner

Spatial management in small-scale fisheries: A potential approach for climate change adaptation in Pacific Islands

For the week of 23 October 2017

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Important notice! This is the last Literature Update that will include non-free (i.e. pay-walled) articles. Starting with next week's Update, we will only include literature items that are free for everyone to read permanently. We will, however, continue to add pay-walled literature to the OpenChannels Literature Library. You can either periodically check the Literature Library yourself for all our content, or you can subscribe to email notifications of new Literature items.

As we mentioned before, abstracts of pay-walled articles are read (by you all) about 50% less than abstracts of freely-available articles. And on top of that, only about half of you all reading the abstracts of pay-walled articles go on to access the full-text, whereas about 95% of you access the full-text of freely-available articles. Shorter newsletters from us are also more likely to reach your inboxes. In short, spending limited resources to send articles that 95% of you read is much better than spending those same resources sending out articles that only 25% of you read.

If you have any questions, please contact Nick at nick [at] octogroup.org. With that, onto the literature!

Marine Policy has published, Spatial management in small-scale fisheries: A potential approach for climate change adaptation in Pacific Islands. "Spatial management has the potential to foster small-scale fisheries adaptation to climate change, however, in the face of such a global and transboundary phenomenon, management strategies will need to be carefully designed and implemented. First, key considerations for climate-informed spatial management in small-scale fisheries were identified. Second, these key considerations were illustrated in two selected case studies in Pacific Island countries and territories (i.e. Fiji and Papua New Guinea). Finally, the challenges associated with spatial management in a changing climate are discussed and ways forward for advancing this type of management as a climate adaptation approach for small-scale fisheries in the Pacific and beyond are proposed."

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let us know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email Allie directly at abrown [at] openchannels.org.

Estimated cost to rent or purchase all pay-walled articles included in this issue from their respective publishers: US $283.05.

Happy reading,
-Allie Brown, Andrew Lewin, and Nick Wehner

Global trade statistics lack granularity to inform traceability and management of diverse and high-value fishes

For the week of 16 October 2017

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Scientific Reports has published, Global trade statistics lack granularity to inform traceability and management of diverse and high-value fishes. "By collating and comparing production, import and export data from international and national statistical collections for the period 2006–2013, we show that official trade data severely lack the level of detail required to track snapper trade flows, uncover potential IUU activities and/or inform exploitation management of snappers and related species. Moreover, we contend that the lack of taxonomic granularity and use of vague generic names in trade records represent one of the most insidious impediments to seafood traceability, and suggest that widely used harmonised commodity classification systems should evolve to address these gaps."

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let us know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email Allie directly at abrown [at] openchannels.org.

Estimated cost to rent or purchase all pay-walled articles included in this issue from their respective publishers: US $562.35.

P.S. This is a friendly reminder that starting November 1, we will no longer include closed (e.g. pay-walled with no preprint and grey-OA) articles in these updates. For full details, see the notice in the Literature Update from the week of September 11.

Happy reading,
-Allie Brown & Nick Wehner

Introducing MarXiv: the research repository for ocean-conservation and marine-climate science

For the week of 9 October 2017

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Thanks to the support from the Packard Foundation, we are pleased to announce that next month we'll be launching MarXiv: the (free!) research repository for ocean-conservation and marine-climate science. Studies have found that lack of access to costly academic journals result in less primary science being used in on-the-ground environmental management plans. Managers, policymakers, NGOs, and many governments simply can't afford to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to subscribe to academic journals. MarXiv seeks to change this.

An author who retains copyright on their submitted manuscript, known colloquially as a preprint, may upload the manuscript to MarXiv. Anyone may then download and read the preprint free of charge, legally, forever. No more time wasted begging the author for a copy, and no need to "pirate" the research in a not-so-legal manner. MarXiv will be built into the Center for Open Science's OSF Preprints framework which grants each paper a unique DOI, and ensures the papers are indexed by Google Scholar, Altmetric, and other services — all at no cost.

We invite you to join us next month as we launch MarXiv. Nick will be hosting a webinar to explain what preprints are, how you can tell when/if you can share your preprint on MarXiv, and explain ways the MarXiv Team will promote your research — including summarizing preprints for managers and policymakers. For more information and to register, please visit: https://oct.to/MarXivIntro.

If you have questions about MarXiv, please contact Nick at nick [at] octogroup.org.

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let us know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email Allie directly at abrown [at] openchannels.org.

Estimated cost to rent or purchase all pay-walled articles included in this issue from their respective publishers: US $416.65.

P.S. This is a friendly reminder that starting November 1, we will no longer include closed (e.g. pay-walled with no preprint and grey-OA) articles in these updates. For full details, see the notice in the Literature Update from the week of September 11.

Happy reading,
-Allie Brown & Nick Wehner

North American Marine Protected Area Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool

For the week of 2 October 2017

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

The Commission for Environmental Cooperation has published the North American Marine Protected Area Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool. The Tool "was created to help marine protected area managers evaluate the implications of climate change for the habitats of their sites. This tool has three parts (a user guide, a set of blank worksheets, and a booklet containing sample completed worksheets) that are available as downloadable PDFs. [...] Together, they comprise a tool that can help marine protected area managers conduct a rapid vulnerability assessment and adaptation strategy development process."

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let us know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email Allie directly at abrown [at] openchannels.org.

Estimated cost to rent or purchase all pay-walled articles included in this issue from their respective publishers: US $389.75.

P.S. This is a friendly reminder that starting November 1, we will no longer include closed (e.g. pay-walled with no preprint and grey-OA) articles in these updates. For full details, see the notice in the Literature Update from the week of September 11.

Happy reading,
-Allie Brown & Nick Wehner

Brain damage & behavioural disorders in fish induced by plastic nanoparticles delivered through the food chain

For the week of 25 September 2017

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Scientific Reports has published, Brain damage and behavioural disorders in fish induced by plastic nanoparticles delivered through the food chain. "Here we demonstrate that plastic nanoparticles reduce survival of aquatic zooplankton and penetrate the blood-to-brain barrier in fish and cause behavioural disorders [...] thereby severely disrupting the function of natural ecosystems."

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let us know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email Allie directly at abrown [at] openchannels.org.

Estimated cost to rent or purchase all pay-walled articles included in this issue from their respective publishers: US $531.15. In fact, this issue breaks the $25k mark in pay-walled research we've shared since late February!

P.S. This is a friendly reminder that starting November 1, we will no longer include closed (e.g. pay-walled with no preprint and grey-OA) articles in these updates. For full details, see the notice in the Literature Update from the week of September 11.

Happy reading,
-Allie Brown & Nick Wehner

Benefits and risks of diversification for individual fishers

For the week of 18 September 2017

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

PNAS has published, Benefits and risks of diversification for individual fishers. "Here, we evaluate two axes by which fishers in Alaska can diversify fishing activities. [...] Our results demonstrate that the most effective option for individuals to decrease revenue variability is to participate in additional or more diverse fisheries. However, this option is expensive, often limited by regulations such as catch share programs, and consequently unavailable to many individuals."

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let us know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email Allie directly at abrown [at] openchannels.org.

Estimated cost to rent or purchase all pay-walled articles included in this issue from their respective publishers: US $506.85.

P.S. This is a friendly reminder that starting November 1, we will no longer include closed (e.g. pay-walled with no preprint and grey-OA) articles in these updates. For full details, see the notice in the Literature Update from the week of September 11.

Happy reading,
-Allie Brown & Nick Wehner

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