OpenChannels Literature Update Archives

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Engaging Communities in Offshore Wind: Case Studies and Lessons Learned from New England Islands

For the week of 14 December 2015

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Island Institute has published a new report, Engaging Communities in Offshore Wind: Case Studies and Lessons Learned from New England Islands. "The report highlights key insights for designing good community engagement processes and demonstrates these best practices through case studies from Block Island (RI), Martha’s Vineyard (MA), and Monhegan (ME)." You may access the full-text using the link above.

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let me know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email me directly at nwehner [at] openchannels.org.

Happy reading,
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Shortfalls in the global protected area network at representing marine biodiversity

For the week of 07 December 2015

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Scientific Reports has published, Shortfalls in the global protected area network at representing marine biodiversity. The authors "assess the overlap of global MPAs with the ranges of 17,348 marine species (fishes, mammals, invertebrates), and find that 97.4% of species have <10% of their ranges represented in stricter conservation classes." You may access the full-text using the link above.

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let me know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email me directly at nwehner [at] openchannels.org.

Happy reading,
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Squidpops: A Simple Tool to Crowdsource a Global Map of Marine Predation Intensity

For the week of 30 November 2015

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

PLoS ONE has published, Squidpops: A Simple Tool to Crowdsource a Global Map of Marine Predation Intensity. The authors present a method to measure predation intensity using bait tied around a plant stake. These baited stakes, which the authors call "squidpops" are inserted into the stratum of a study area, and may be monitored using GoPro cameras. You may access the full-text using the link above.

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let me know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email me directly at nwehner [at] openchannels.org.

Happy reading,
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Levels and drivers of fishers’ compliance with marine protected areas

For the week of 23 November 2015

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Ecology and Society has published, Levels and drivers of fishers’ compliance with marine protected areas. The authors studied 12 MPAs in Costa Rica to test the effects of different variables (such as partially-closed fisheries, MPA size, etc.) on fishers' compliance with MPAs. You may access the full-text using the link above.

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let me know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email me directly at nwehner [at] openchannels.org.

Happy reading,
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Strategic management decision-making in a complex world: quantifying, understanding, and using trade-offs

For the week of 16 November 2015

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

ICES Journal of Marine Science has published, Strategic management decision-making in a complex world: quantifying, understanding, and using trade-offs. The author uses case studies to illustrate "the basis for identifying management objectives and representing them mathematically using performance measures, as well as how trade-offs among management objectives have been displayed to various audiences who provide input into decision-making." You may access the full-text using the link above.

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let me know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email me directly at nwehner [at] openchannels.org.

Happy reading,
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

How to select networks of marine protected areas for multiple species with different dispersal strategies

For the week of 09 November 2015

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Diversity and Distributions has published, How to select networks of marine protected areas for multiple species with different dispersal strategies. The authors describe a conceptual framework which may be used to identify MPA networks which contain species with a variety of dispersal strategies, comparing these ideal MPAs with existing North Sea MPAs.

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let me know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email me directly at nwehner [at] openchannels.org .

Happy reading,
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Mapping Habitats and Developing Baselines in Offshore Marine Reserves with Little Prior Knowledge: A Critical Evaluation of a New Approach

For the week of 02 November 2015

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

PLoS ONE has published, Mapping Habitats and Developing Baselines in Offshore Marine Reserves with Little Prior Knowledge: A Critical Evaluation of a New Approach. The authors evaluate Multibeam Echosounder mapping and Generalized Random Tessellation Stratified sampling methods for identifying benthic habitats in Australia's Commonwealth Marine Reserve Network. You may access the full-text using the link above.

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let me know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email me directly at nwehner [at] openchannels.org.

Happy reading,
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

What Happens after Conservation and Management Donors Leave? A Before and After Study

For the week of 26 October 2015

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

PLoS ONE has published, What Happens after Conservation and Management Donors Leave? A Before and After Study of Coral Reef Ecology and Stakeholder Perceptions of Management Benefits. The authors examined the management of the coral reefs of Tanga, Tanzania, which received funding from 1994-2007 to recover from dynamite fishing and other destructive practices. Of note: "the social-ecological results suggest that increased compliance with gear restrictions is largely responsible for the improvements in reef ecology." You may access the full-text using the link above.

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let me know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email me directly at nwehner [at] openchannels.org .

Happy reading,
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

The good, the bad and the ugly of marine reserves for fishery yields

For the weeks of 12 & 19 October 2015

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Philosophical Transactions B has published, The good, the bad and the ugly of marine reserves for fishery yields. This work is included in a special issue of the journal on "Measuring the difference made by protected areas: methods, applications and implications for policy and practice." Speaking of special issues, Ocean and Coastal Management has just published one on "Making Marine Science Matter: Issues and Solutions from the 3rd International Marine Conservation Congress" in which all the articles are open-access.

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let me know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email me directly at nwehner [at] openchannels.org.

Happy reading,
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

Anthropogenic debris in seafood: Plastic debris and fibers from textiles in fish and bivalves sold for human consumption

For the week of 05 October 2015

Greetings OpenChannels Community Members,

Scientific Reports has published, Anthropogenic debris in seafood: Plastic debris and fibers from textiles in fish and bivalves sold for human consumption. The authors sampled seafood from Indonesia and the US, finding anthropogenic debris in the digestive tracts of 28% and 25% of individual fish, respectively. You may download the full-text using the link above. There's been a lively discussion of this and other similar ongoing research over on our sister listserv, MarineDebris.Info. If you're interested in joining the conversation, signup here.

As always, if we've missed anything, please feel free to let me know. You may simply reply to this message, or you may email me directly at nwehner [at] openchannels.org.

Happy reading,
-Nick Wehner, OpenChannels Project Manager

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