Aquaculture

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Posted on February 20, 2018 - 10:17am, by raye
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Via The Seattle Times

"An independent Canadian lab that studied 19 Atlantic salmon escaped from Cooke Aquaculture’s Cypress Island net pen last August found they all were infected with a virus that can be spread to wild Pacific salmon."

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Posted on February 12, 2018 - 10:13am, by raye
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Via The Fish Site

"Kenya has seen significant aquaculture growth and development over the years, but one of the constraints faced by Kenyan farmers is a low survival rate among fry, due to the low-quality, or lack, of live feeds. This has led to an increasing demand for valuable sources such as Artemia (brine shrimp) biomass and cysts (the shrimps’ dormant eggs). Artemia are particularly convenient as their cysts can be stored in airtight cans for many years and hatched 24 hours prior to feeding."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 12, 2018 - 10:05am, by raye

Via KQED

"Traces of life on land are increasingly showing up in oceans and in ocean life. Scientists are finding a growing presence of pharmaceuticals, small pieces of plastic and household chemicals in the bodies of Pacific razor clams, Pacific oysters and remote seabird"

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Posted on February 9, 2018 - 11:52am, by raye
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Via Hakai Magazine

"When the September die-off hit, ecologist Claudia Halsband from Akvaplan-niva a private research firm, hurried to the fjord and spent a week sampling the waters. Halsband and a team of scientists from the firm and Norwegian universities had spent the summer in Ryggefjord, working the case of those earlier mass mortalities, though without much luck. But when she returned two months later, Halsband finally found something out of the ordinary."

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Posted on February 7, 2018 - 12:49pm, by raye
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Via Marine Conservation Society

"The inquiry into the environmental impact of salmon farming follows a report that highlighted the potential for lice from farmed salmon to damage wild populations of fish. The report, by SAMS Research Services, said there were gaps in the data and called for farm lice statistics to be put in the public domain."

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Posted on February 6, 2018 - 1:55pm, by raye
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Via National Geographic

"Starting in 2014, teams at Protix researched different types of insects. Eventually, they discovered that the black soldier fly has a large amount of protein stored during its larvae stage because the fly doesn’t eat once it is hatched. Salmon, which are notoriously picky, liked the food made from the black soldier flies better than the other alternatives."

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Posted on February 5, 2018 - 9:43am, by raye
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Via Hakai Magazine

"The Apalachicola Bay fishery dates back to the 1800s and once provided 12 percent of the country’s eastern oysters. Its devastation has raised a host of questions about the source of its decline. Was the collapse caused by overharvesting, a lack of fresh water, low nutrients, poor habitat management, or all of the above? It’s a debate that has raged everywhere from the fishing docks to the US Supreme Court."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on January 26, 2018 - 1:10pm, by raye
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Via Yale Environment 360

"...offshore aquaculture supporters point out, data-rich geographic information systems enable companies and regulators to make smarter decisions about where to locate fish farms, so that stronger currents and deeper waters can dilute and wash away waste and pollution. Offshore projects are also less likely to provoke opposition from shoreline property owners."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on January 16, 2018 - 10:44am, by raye
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Via The Herald

"Plans to open a controversial fish farm in a protected sea area have been dropped after unprecedented opposition due to fears for some of Scotland’s rarest marine life found living near the site. The huge Sound of Jura development would have contained a dozen circular cages capable of hosting around one million fish, mainly rainbow trout. But the plan has now been scrapped after sea-bed surveys showed a variety of rare marine species living near the site."

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