Climate Change

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Posted on April 24, 2017 - 9:11am, by nwehner
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Via Sea Monster

"The temporal pattern of decline is concordant with the hypothesis that warming caused most Caribbean coral loss. Modern, human-caused ocean warming started around 1920 and began to accelerate in the late 1960s. Across the Caribbean (as well as globally) regional average coral cover began to decline roughly 10 years later (~ in the late 1970s-early 1980s, sampling is sparse during this period so it’s impossible to be more precise)."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 21, 2017 - 6:42pm, by abrown
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Via NOAA

"Hot on the heels of the second warmest winter in the 138-year record, March continued the global warm trend that could last well into this year — especially with increasing chances for the arrival of El Nino by late summer or fall." 

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 21, 2017 - 9:19am, by nwehner
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Via Ars Technica

"Texas will probably be the state absorbing the greatest number of climate migrants, according to the model, possibly as many as 1.5 million. Georgia and North Carolina are next in line. Florida could lose as many as 2.5 million people, and Louisiana and New Jersey are also likely to be particularly hard-hit by migration away from coastal zones. But “no state is left untouched,” Hauer writes. And there will also be migration within states, meaning that more than half the counties in the US are likely to be affected by migration."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 19, 2017 - 9:19am, by nwehner
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Via Anthropocene

"Last year, Hauer and his colleagues used data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to calculate that 13.1 million people in 319 coastal U.S. counties could be forced to move if sea level rises 1.8 meters by the year 2100."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 17, 2017 - 8:18am, by nwehner
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Via ThinkProgress

"Amidst backlash and subscription cancellations for hiring extreme climate science denier, Bret Stephens, the New York Times offered a stunning defense: There are “millions of people who agree with him.”"

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 13, 2017 - 10:42pm, by abrown
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Via Scientific American

"Whales are crucial to ocean carbon absorption. As whale numbers dwindle, it could lead to increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, scientists say. But if conservation efforts pay off, whales could play a role in helping the islands meet the reductions to their nationally determined contributions (NDCs) of greenhouse gases framed in the Paris Agreement."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 13, 2017 - 11:59am, by nwehner

Via The Washington Post

"Climate change is one of the main characters in the new season of “Deadliest Catch,” with the crab fishermen in one of Discovery’s most enduring and popular shows forced to deal with a sudden warming of the Bering Sea that chases their prey into deeper, more dangerous water."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 12, 2017 - 10:17am, by nwehner
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Via University of Amsterdam

"Researchers from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) have invented a new catalyst that can efficiently convert carbon dioxide (CO2) to carbon monoxide (CO). This soon-to-be patented invention enables the sustainable utilisation of CO2, a potent greenhouse gas linked to climate change. If successful on a larger scale, this invention could provide a practical way to convert CO2 to useful chemicals."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 7, 2017 - 10:38am, by abrown

Via The Guardian

"A coalition of 17 US states filed a legal challenge on Wednesday against efforts by Donald Trump’s administration to roll back climate change regulations, deepening a political rift over his emerging energy policies."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 5, 2017 - 10:56pm, by abrown
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Via Science News

"Sea ice skylights formed by warming Arctic temperatures increasingly allow enough sunlight into the waters below to spur phytoplankton blooms, new research suggests. Such conditions, probably a rarity more than two decades ago, now extend to roughly 30 percent of the ice-covered Arctic Ocean during July, researchers report March 29 in Science Advances."

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