Climate Change

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Posted on November 1, 2017 - 2:52pm, by abrown

Via The Herald

"Researchers by one of Europe's leading marine science research organisations, has predicted that by 2100 commercially important species could migrate out from [Scotland’s west coast waters], most likely to colder waters further north, in response to rising sea temperatures."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on November 1, 2017 - 2:31pm, by abrown
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Via Phys.org

"The head of the U.N. environment program said Tuesday the United States is likely to live up to the Paris climate deal despite President Donald Trump's planned pullout, because "all the big American companies" are working toward greener operations."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on November 1, 2017 - 10:38am, by nwehner
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Via The Washington Post

"Atop a jagged, 50-foot-high cliff on the Bahamian island of Eleuthera sit two enormous boulders known as “The Cow and the Bull.” Each is several times taller than a person; the squatter and wider of the two, the “Bull,” weighs around a thousand tons. The boulders are a tourist attraction, but in recent years, they’ve become much more than that — a scientific mystery that has been  scrutinized because of the lessons it could hold about climate change."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on October 31, 2017 - 7:24am, by abrown
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Via Mongabay

"A recent tech-based event offered the extensive experience of three panelists on the frontlines of applying technology to conserve a key ecosystem.

Directors of Global Forest Watch, Rainforest Connection, and Protected Seas discussed how technology’s role expands, as its precision, reach, and cost-effectiveness continue to improve.

Panelists stressed the need for technology to connect people to each other and to the species and ecosystems in need of conservation support.

Nevertheless, the panelists agreed, information is not enough; achieving conservation outcomes requires “accounting for the human factor” in maintaining transparency and good governance."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on October 26, 2017 - 11:12am, by nwehner
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Via The Washington Post

"Climate change could lead to sea level rises that are larger, and happen more rapidly, than previously thought, according to a trio of new studies that reflect mounting concerns about the stability of polar ice."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on October 24, 2017 - 1:37pm, by abrown
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Via Phys.org

"Rising sea levels and human activities are fast creating a "worst case scenario" for Native Americans of the Mississippi Delta who stand to lose not just their homes, but their irreplaceable heritage, to climate change."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on October 24, 2017 - 11:07am, by nwehner
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Via Ars Technica

"While warming waters will produce more powerful storms in the future, climate models suggest that they'll generally track further offshore of the city, a combination that ends up cancelling itself out. Unfortunately, due to rising oceans, the risk of flooding will keep going up, with what was once a 500-year flood occurring every 25 years by mid-century."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on October 19, 2017 - 10:41am, by abrown

Via The Seattle Times

"Surveys off Washington’s coast detected low numbers of juvenile salmon from the Columbia River, including spring chinook, a bad omen for orcas and other species that rely on the king of fish."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on October 16, 2017 - 2:08pm, by abrown
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Via Keys News

Dive teams are conducting surveys and collecting data to determine which areas may benefit from immediate actions, such as removing debris and repositioning coral. This rapid assessment will give the sanctuary and scientists a snapshot of the current status of the reef, and it will inform future management of the sanctuary resources, Sanctuary Superintendent Sarah Fangman said.

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on October 13, 2017 - 9:58am, by nwehner
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Via Ars Technica

"Climeworks’ Swiss plant is an array of 18 blower units, together capable of capturing about 900 tons of CO2 per year, which is about what 55 average Americans emit. The company has installed one of these units (so capturing only about 50 tons per year) in Iceland as a test."

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