Corals

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Posted on April 20, 2018 - 10:08am, by raye
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Via Hakai Magazine

"For corals, color is more than superficial. Across the tropical Pacific, one species of reef-building coral, known as rice coral, comes in two colors: dark red and rusty orange. And as new research shows, these colors lend the corals different superpowers."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 12, 2018 - 11:25am, by raye
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Via News Deeply 

"Environmentalists in Mexico have fought the recent relocation of a coral reef to make way for bigger ships in the Port of Veracruz. They worry about the ecosystem impacts of the port expansion and the precedent it sets for uprooting corals."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 28, 2018 - 9:38am, by raye
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Via Anthropocene

"News about coral reefs seems almost unrelentingly bleak. Everywhere they’re bleaching and collapsing, unable to withstand the ravages of fast-heating waters — except, that is, the northern Red Sea, where it appears that a vast region of exceptionally hardy reefs will survive temperatures far exceeding present-day norms."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 15, 2018 - 10:29am, by raye

Via The Atlantic 

"Albright and her colleagues created a huge inflatable container that would rise from the ocean floor and trap 15,000 liters of seawater, “like submerging a bucket underwater and pulling it up,” she says. They then used a ring of air diffusers, much like those that send bubbles into aquarium tanks, to saturate the trapped water with carbon dioxide. This gas acidified the water, which Albright then pumped over a nearby patch of corals, simulating what these creatures will experience 100 years from now."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 2, 2018 - 10:18am, by raye
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Via Stanford News

"As a way of understanding which factors had the biggest impacts on Hawaii’s corals, a group of researchers from the collaborative Ocean Tipping Points project, co-led by Larry Crowder, the Edward Ricketts Provostial Professor of Marine Ecology and Conservation at Stanford’s Hopkins Marine Station and senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, completed the first-ever comprehensive map of how both humans and natural events influence overall reef health. This new study was published March 1 in PLOS One."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 5, 2018 - 1:29pm, by raye

Via Sierra

"Bleaching doesn’t necessarily kill coral, though it does turn it an eerie bone white. A type of photosynthetic algae called zooanthellae lives in the tissues, producing nutrients and carbon that the coral uses for energy. The symbiotic algae also give corals their stunning colors. When coral undergoes stress from pollution, loss of light, or increasing water temperatures, the zooanthellae are ejected, causing the coral to lose its color and food supply. If things go back to normal relatively quickly, the algae can often recolonize the coral and the system survives."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 1, 2018 - 2:08pm, by raye
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Via Mongabay

"The ecological impacts of repeated ocean warming remain poorly understood in the Galápagos, as they do for many of the world’s coral reefs. The geography of bleaching, recovery and resistance to warming water is virtually unknown because monitoring is very limited."

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