Fisheries

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Posted on August 15, 2017 - 9:11am, by abrown
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Via Fiji Sun Online

"Fiji needs to put in place a seasonal ban to stop the harvesting and sales of groupers (kawakawa and donu) from June to September each year.

The call has been made by Minister for Fisheries, Mr Semi Koroilavesau after a survey that was conducted since 2003 to 2016 confirming that about 70 per cent of aggregation sites that were identified are now declining."

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Posted on August 8, 2017 - 11:05am, by abrown
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Via Phys.org

"The initiative marks the first time that companies from Asia, Europe and the US have joined forces to work on a clear agenda and commitment for change, and illustrate how sustainability scientists can actively engage as change makers."

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Posted on August 8, 2017 - 10:16am, by abrown
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Via Science Daily

"A new study using satellite tracking by researchers from Nova Southeastern University's Guy Harvey Research Institute (GHRI), the University of Rhode Island and other colleagues shows that the fishing mortality rate of the shortfin mako in the western North Atlantic is considerably higher than previously estimated from catches reported by fishermen."

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Posted on July 6, 2017 - 2:20pm, by abrown
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Via The Indian Express

"A panel of experts has drafted a national-level action plan for sustainable development of marine fisheries. Aimed at implementing the Sustainable Development Goal-14 (SDG) of the United Nations in India, the experts from marine fisheries, forests, environment, ocean development, industry, fisher associations and coastal zone management also recommended, among others, licencing scheme to fishing gear and boat building yards too, according to a release here."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on June 21, 2017 - 2:26pm, by abrown
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Via Anthropocene

"What do fish sound like? When Gulf Corvina breed, their mating calls could be likened to an immense, underwater roar. Now, a group of researchers have found a way to use the deafening din to save these fish from exploitation. Using underwater microphones, they’ve developed a method for converting sound recordings of the fish’s calls into precise population estimates. Those could inform more accurate catch limits, they say, that would ultimately make corvina fisheries—and others—more sustainable."

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