2015-08-05

Evaluating the social cost of cruise ships air emissions in major ports of Greece

Maragkogianni A, Papaefthimiou S. Evaluating the social cost of cruise ships air emissions in major ports of Greece. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment [Internet]. 2015 ;36:10 - 17. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1361920915000231
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Journal Article

Detailed NOx, SO2 and PM2.5 emissions have been estimated for cruise ships in the five busiest Greek ports (i.e. Piraeus, Santorini, Mykonos, Corfu and Katakolo) for year 2013. The emissions were analyzed in terms of gas species, seasonality and activity. The total in-port inventory of cruise shipping accounted to 2742.7 tons: with NOx being dominant (1887.5 tons), followed by SO2 and PM2.5 (760.9 and 94.3 tons respectively). Emissions during hotelling corresponded to 88.5% of total and have significantly outweighed those produced during ships’ maneuvering activities (11.5% of total). Seasonality was found to play a major role, as summer emissions and associated impacts were significantly augmented. The anticipated health impacts of ship emissions can reach to €24.3 million or to €5.3 per passenger proving the necessity of control of the emissions produced by cruise ships in port cities or policy and measures towards a more efficient cruise industry.

The Mediterranean and Black Sea Fisheries at Risk from Overexploitation

Tsikliras AC, Dinouli A, Tsiros V-Z, Tsalkou E. The Mediterranean and Black Sea Fisheries at Risk from Overexploitation. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2015 ;10(3):e0121188. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0121188
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Journal Article

The status of the Mediterranean and Black Sea fisheries was evaluated for the period 1970-2010 on a subarea basis, using various indicators including the temporal variability of total landings, the number of recorded stocks, the mean trophic level of the catch, the fishing-in-balance index and the catch-based method of stock classification. All indicators confirmed that the fisheries resources of the Mediterranean and Black Sea are at risk from overexploitation. The pattern of exploitation and the state of stocks differed among the western (W), central (C) and eastern (E) Mediterranean subareas and the Black Sea (BS), with the E Mediterranean and BS fisheries being in a worst shape. Indeed, in the E Mediterranean and the BS, total landings, mean trophic level of the catch and fishing-in-balance index were declining, the cumulative percentage of overexploited and collapsed stocks was higher, and the percentage of developing stocks was lower, compared to the W and C Mediterranean. Our results confirm the need for detailed and extensive stock assessments across species that will eventually lead to stocks recovering through conservation and management measures.

The influence of coral reefs and climate change on wave-driven flooding of tropical coastlines

Quataert E, Storlazzi C, van Rooijen A, Cheriton O, van Dongeren A. The influence of coral reefs and climate change on wave-driven flooding of tropical coastlines. Geophysical Research Letters [Internet]. 2015 . Available from: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064861
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A numerical model, XBeach, calibrated and validated on field data collected at Roi-Namur Island on Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of Marshall Islands, was used to examine the effects of different coral reef characteristics on potential coastal hazards caused by wave-driven flooding and how these effects may be altered by projected climate change. The results presented herein suggest that coasts fronted by relatively narrow reefs with steep fore reef slopes (~1:10 and steeper) and deeper, smoother reef flats are expected to experience the highest wave runup. Wave runup increases for higher water levels (sea level rise), higher waves and lower bed roughness (coral degradation), which are all expected effects of climate change. Rising sea levels and climate change will therefore have a significant negative impact on the ability of coral reefs to mitigate the effects of coastal hazards in the future.

Fewer eggs from larger size limits: counterintuitive outcomes in a spatially heterogeneous fishery

Gardner C, Hartmann K, Punt AE, Hoshino E. Fewer eggs from larger size limits: counterintuitive outcomes in a spatially heterogeneous fishery. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2015 ;72(suppl 1):i252 - i259. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/lookup/doi/10.1093/icesjms/fsu165
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The legal minimum length (LML) of female Southern Rock Lobster (Jasus edwardsii) was reduced in the Tasmanian fishery in 1966 for higher sustainable catches. Originally, the LML was to be reduced in slow growth southern areas only; however, the change was implemented across the entire fishery due to lobbying by commercial fishers. The lower LML has been controversial ever since, including during recent years when low recruitment resulted in a lower total allowable catch (TAC). Fishers argued that this could have been prevented with a higher female LML across the jurisdiction. A length- and sex-based bioeconomic model was used to examine probable outcomes of the larger statewide LML. This model showed that management of egg production would be poorly served by raising the statewide LML because of spatial patterns in the stock and fishery. Catch would be displaced from areas where egg production was already high and into the most depleted areas thus reducing production in areas of greatest concern. Spatial variation in biological parameters can have a profound effect on outcomes of management perceived to be conservative, possibly leading to negative impacts. This risk exists wherever catch is displaced, such as with Marine Protected Areas, spatial TACs and gear restrictions.

Scottish lobster fisheries and environmental variability

Lizárraga-Cubedo HA, Tuck I, Bailey N, Pierce GJ, Zuur AF, Bova D. Scottish lobster fisheries and environmental variability. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2015 ;72(suppl 1):i211 - i224. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/lookup/doi/10.1093/icesjms/fsu248
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Variability in the fluctuations of two Scottish lobster populations, the Hebrides and Southeast, was investigated from available long dataseries of fishery and environmental variables. In a multivariate context, relationships between selected environmental variables and the fishery data were studied at different spatial and temporal (annual, spring, and autumn) scales and from individual and overall sampled fleet. Multivariate techniques such as cross-correlation function, principal components analysis, and redundancy analysis confirmed that the capture of lobsters was strongly influenced by sea surface temperature, windspeed, and sea level pressure throughout the year, and this dependence affected the duration of the fishery. There were evident differences in the patterns of environmental variables for both regions. In the Hebrides, the total variation (42%) of the interaction fishery-environmental variables for spring and autumn fisheries could be attributed to the environmental variables in an 89%. For the Southeast, spring fishery was more affected by changes in the environment, with a total variation of 34%, from which 85% could be explained by the environmental variables tested, than autumn fishery where catches and catch rates may be more affected by the way individual vessel and sampled fleet operate. Two elements were identified, Hebrides and Southeast spring and autumn fisheries. The Hebrides lobster population is strongly influenced by density-independence processes at all spatial scales. The Southeast fishery is also driven by environmental processes, with higher correlations for recruits with differences at small and large spatial scales.

American lobster nurseries of southern New England receding in the face of climate change

Wahle RA, Dellinger L, Olszewski S, Jekielek P. American lobster nurseries of southern New England receding in the face of climate change. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2015 ;72(suppl 1):i69 - i78. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/lookup/doi/10.1093/icesjms/fsv093
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Historically, southern New England has supported one of the most productive American lobster (Homarus americanus) fisheries of the northeast United States. Recently, the region has seen dramatic declines in lobster populations coincident with a trend of increasingly stressful summer warmth and shell disease. We report significant declines in the abundance, distribution, and size composition of juvenile lobsters that have accompanied the warming trend in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, since the first comprehensive survey of lobster nurseries conducted there in 1990. We used diver-based visual surveys and suction sampling in 1990, 2011, and 2012, supplemented by post-larval collectors in 2011 and 2012. In 1990, lobster nurseries extended from the outer coast into the mid-sections of the bay, but by 2011 and 2012 they were largely restricted to the outer coast and deeper water at the mouth of the bay. Among five new study sites selected by the lobster fishing industry for the 2011 and 2012 surveys, the deepest site on the outer coast (15–17 m depth) harboured some of the highest lobster densities in the survey. Separate fixed site hydrographic monitoring at 13 locations in the bay by the Rhode Island Division of Fish and Wildlife recorded an approximately 2.0°C increase in summer surface temperatures over the period, with 2012 being the warmest on record. Additional monitoring of bottom temperatures, dissolved oxygen and pH at our sampling sites in 2011 and 2012 indicated conditions falling below physiological optima for lobsters during summer. The invasion of the Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, since the 1990s may also be contributing to declines of juvenile lobster shallow zones (<5 m) in this region. Because lobster populations appear increasingly restricted to deeper and outer coastal waters of southern New England, further monitoring of settlement and nursery habitat in deep water is warranted.

European lobster stocking requires comprehensive impact assessment to determine fishery benefits

Ellis CD, Hodgson DJ, Daniels CL, Boothroyd DP, R. Bannister CA, Griffiths AGF. European lobster stocking requires comprehensive impact assessment to determine fishery benefits. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2015 ;72(suppl 1):i35 - i48. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/lookup/doi/10.1093/icesjms/fsu196
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Historically, hatcheries in Europe and North America attempted to contribute to the conservation and enhancement of clawed lobster stocks, but lacked monitoring programmes capable of assessing success. In the 1990s, this perspective was changed by the results of restocking and stock enhancement experiments that inserted microwire tags into hatchery-reared juvenile European lobsters (Homarus gammarus) before release. This allowed recapture in sufficient numbers to prove that lobsters had survived and recruited to the mature fishable stock. However, evidence of recruitment still failed to answer key questions about the ultimate ecological and economic benefits. As a result, a growing number of lobster stocking ventures remain hindered by a lack of clear evidence of the effects of their stocking schemes. This review evaluates these experiments and related studies on other fished species, summarizes key findings, and identifies data and knowledge gaps. Although studies of fitness in cultured lobsters provide some of the most encouraging results from the wider field of hatchery-based stocking, the limitations of physical tagging technology have significantly hindered appraisals of stocking impacts. We lack basic knowledge of lobster ecology and population dynamics, especially among prerecruits, and of the impact of stocking on wild lobster population genetics. We advocate the use of genetic methods to further our understanding of population structure, rearing processes, and stocking success. We also recommend that more focused and comprehensive impact assessments are required to provide a robust endorsement or rejection of stocking as a viable tool for the sustainable management of lobster fisheries.

A review of lobster fishery management: the Western Australian fishery for Panulirus cygnus, a case study in the development and implementation of input and output-based management systems

Penn JW, Caputi N, de Lestang S. A review of lobster fishery management: the Western Australian fishery for Panulirus cygnus, a case study in the development and implementation of input and output-based management systems. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2015 ;72(suppl 1):i22 - i34. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/lookup/doi/10.1093/icesjms/fsv057
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Lobster stocks around the world support high-value fisheries with production currently about 260,000 tonnes annually. The largest fisheries harvest HomarusNephrops and Panulirus species with smaller production from the JasusPalinurus and Scylarid species groups. The majority of larger industrial fisheries have systems limiting fishing effort or catches, while many of the smaller fisheries remain open access and have yet to implement basic management controls. The review uses the Western Australian fishery for Panulirus cygnus, valued between AUS$200–400 million annually with a long history of successful management, as a case study for the consideration of lobster fisheries management systems more generally. The conclusions from the review suggest that an evolutionary approach to management with biological controls as a precursor to input-based controls is necessary to allow sufficient fishery-based data to be accumulated for management decision processes to be effective. The case study experience suggests that well-defined fishing rights leading to an input-based total allowable effort system with individually transferable effort (ITE) units can provide efficient mechanisms for the reduction of latent effort, which characterises most lobster fisheries with open access or basic limited entry. Further the system has been shown to be capable of generating significant license values for fishermen while maintaining owner-operators as the dominant group in the fishery. The ITE system was also used effectively to adjust fishing to compensate for a severe environmentally-driven downturn in recruitment, but resulted in highly complex management rules. In 2010 the fishery moved seamlessly to a total allowable catch with individually transferable quotas which removed the complexity of management, further increased the catch value and reduced costs of fishing. Price/earnings (P/E) ratios have been used to track trends in license values which highlight the industry’s increasing economic viability over time under both input and output based management.

Reproductive Failure in UK Harbour Porpoises Phocoena phocoena: Legacy of Pollutant Exposure?

Murphy S, Barber JL, Learmonth JA, Read FL, Deaville R, Perkins MW, Brownlow A, Davison N, Penrose R, Pierce GJ, et al. Reproductive Failure in UK Harbour Porpoises Phocoena phocoena: Legacy of Pollutant Exposure?. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2015 ;10(7):e0131085. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0131085
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Reproductive failure in mammals due to exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can occur either through endocrine disrupting effects or via immunosuppression and increased disease risk. To investigate further, full necropsies and determination of summed 25 polychlorinated biphenyls congeners (∑PCBs lipid weight) in blubber were undertaken on 329 UK-stranded female harbour porpoises (1990-2012). In sexually mature females, 25/127 (19.7%) showed direct evidence of reproductive failure (foetal death, aborting, dystocia or stillbirth). A further 21/127 (16.5%) had infections of the reproductive tract or tumours of reproductive tract tissues that could contribute to reproductive failure. Resting mature females (non-lactating or non-pregnant) had significantly higher mean ∑PCBs (18.5 mg/kg) than both lactating (7.5 mg/kg) and pregnant females (6 mg/kg), though not significantly different to sexually immature females (14.0 mg/kg). Using multinomial logistic regression models ΣPCBs was found to be a significant predictor of mature female reproductive status, adjusting for the effects of confounding variables. Resting females were more likely to have a higher PCB burden. Health status (proxied by “trauma” or “infectious disease” causes of death) was also a significant predictor, with lactating females (i.e. who successfully reproduced) more likely to be in good health status compared to other individuals. Based on contaminant profiles (>11 mg/kg lipid), at least 29/60 (48%) of resting females had not offloaded their pollutant burden via gestation and primarily lactation. Where data were available, these non-offloading females were previously gravid, which suggests foetal or newborn mortality. Furthermore, a lower pregnancy rate of 50% was estimated for “healthy” females that died of traumatic causes of death, compared to other populations. Whether or not PCBs are part of an underlying mechanism, we used individual PCB burdens to show further evidence of reproductive failure in the North-east Atlantic harbour porpoise population, results that should inform conservation management.

Characteristics and Propagation of Airgun Pulses in Shallow Water with Implications for Effects on Small Marine Mammals

Hermannsen L, Tougaard J, Beedholm K, Nabe-Nielsen J, Madsen PTeglberg. Characteristics and Propagation of Airgun Pulses in Shallow Water with Implications for Effects on Small Marine Mammals. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2015 ;10(7):e0133436. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0133436
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Airguns used in seismic surveys are among the most prevalent and powerful anthropogenic noise sources in marine habitats. They are designed to produce most energy below 100 Hz, but the pulses have also been reported to contain medium-to-high frequency components with the potential to affect small marine mammals, which have their best hearing sensitivity at higher frequencies. In shallow water environments, inhabited by many of such species, the impact of airgun noise may be particularly challenging to assess due to complex propagation conditions. To alleviate the current lack of knowledge on the characteristics and propagation of airgun pulses in shallow water with implications for effects on small marine mammals, we recorded pulses from a single airgun with three operating volumes (10 in3, 25 in3 and 40 in3) at six ranges (6, 120, 200, 400, 800 and 1300 m) in a uniform shallow water habitat using two calibrated Reson 4014 hydrophones and four DSG-Ocean acoustic data recorders. We show that airgun pulses in this shallow habitat propagated out to 1300 meters in a way that can be approximated by a 18log(r) geometric transmission loss model, but with a high pass filter effect from the shallow water depth. Source levels were back-calculated to 192 dB re µPa2s (sound exposure level) and 200 dB re 1 µPa dB Leq-fast (rms over 125 ms duration), and the pulses contained substantial energy up to 10 kHz, even at the furthest recording station at 1300 meters. We conclude that the risk of causing hearing damage when using single airguns in shallow waters is small for both pinnipeds and porpoises. However, there is substantial potential for significant behavioral responses out to several km from the airgun, well beyond the commonly used shut-down zone of 500 meters.

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