2015-11-25

Shifts in coral reef biogeochemistry and resulting acidification linked to offshore productivity

Yeakel KL, Andersson AJ, Bates NR, Noyes TJ, Collins A, Garley R. Shifts in coral reef biogeochemistry and resulting acidification linked to offshore productivity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2015 . Available from: http://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1507021112
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) has acidified open-ocean surface waters by 0.1 pH units since preindustrial times. Despite unequivocal evidence of ocean acidification (OA) via open-ocean measurements for the past several decades, it has yet to be documented in near-shore and coral reef environments. A lack of long-term measurements from these environments restricts our understanding of the natural variability and controls of seawater CO2-carbonate chemistry and biogeochemistry, which is essential to make accurate predictions on the effects of future OA on coral reefs. Here, in a 5-y study of the Bermuda coral reef, we show evidence that variations in reef biogeochemical processes drive interannual changes in seawater pH and Ωaragonite that are partly controlled by offshore processes. Rapid acidification events driven by shifts toward increasing net calcification and net heterotrophy were observed during the summers of 2010 and 2011, with the frequency and extent of such events corresponding to increased offshore productivity. These events also coincided with a negative winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index, which historically has been associated with extensive offshore mixing and greater primary productivity at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site. Our results reveal that coral reefs undergo natural interannual events of rapid acidification due to shifts in reef biogeochemical processes that may be linked to offshore productivity and ultimately controlled by larger-scale climatic and oceanographic processes.

Metropolitan estuaries and sea-level rise: Adaptive environmental planning solutions at the regional scale

Pinto PJanela. Metropolitan estuaries and sea-level rise: Adaptive environmental planning solutions at the regional scale. Berkeley, California: University of California, Berkeley; 2015. Available from: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/77t8p10g
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Thesis

Wide estuaries are natural magnets for urban development. Several of the World’s major cities developed around estuaries, but at the same time encroached upon some of the most complex and vital ecosystems. Sea-level rise threatens to submerge both rare wetland habitat and essential urban areas and infrastructure. This prospect discloses the urgency of balancing urban development and environmental protection in Metropolitan Estuaries. The hard task of dealing with this threat may provide the opportunity to promote an integrated approach to regional planning, where the necessary adaptation of cities to sea-level rise could equally promote the preservation, or even the enhancement, of wetland habitat.

The two case study metropolitan estuaries, San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and the Tagus Estuary (Lisbon, Portugal), share striking similarities in terms of morphology. They both host large metropolitan areas and important wetland ecosystems. Nevertheless, a finer analysis of development patterns reveals crucial differences in the extent of shoreline alteration and types of land use that now encroach upon natural estuarine habitat. The comparative study of both estuaries provides mutually beneficial insights on the shortcomings of each system, and helps identify opportunities to enhance coastal zone management, adaptive governance and environmental planning efforts. 

ReefKIM: An integrated geodatabase for sustainable management of the Kimberley Reefs, North West Australia

Kordi MN, Collins LB, O'Leary M, Stevens A. ReefKIM: An integrated geodatabase for sustainable management of the Kimberley Reefs, North West Australia. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2016 ;119:234 - 243. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569115300557
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Coral reefs of the Kimberley Bioregion are seldom studied due to limited accessibility and extreme water conditions, which make management of these vital ecosystems a challenging task. Managing reef resources requires a considerable amount of credible, consistent and continual information. We identified the geographic information system (GIS) approach to be useful in developing an integrated geodatabase by acquiring information from different sources relating to the Kimberley reefs. Based on this approach, the study aimed to create a foundation for the first comprehensive geodatabase of the Kimberley reefs, called ReefKIM. The work included compiling existing spatial and non-spatial data, as well as collecting new data to complete information gaps. The study demonstrates how new technologies can be harnessed to crowdsource data from a wide range of people though a web-based platform. ReefKIM will provide a practical tool for scientists and managers to facilitate better monitoring and sustainable management of these vital natural resources. Moreover, it will support further studies in various disciplines leading to a more detailed understanding of the Kimberley Bioregion reefs.

Reliability assessment and integrity management of data buoy instruments used for monitoring the Indian Seas

Venkatesan R, Vengatesan G, Vedachalam N, M. Muthiah A, Lavanya R, Atmanand MA. Reliability assessment and integrity management of data buoy instruments used for monitoring the Indian Seas. Applied Ocean Research [Internet]. 2016 ;54:1 - 11. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0141118715001297
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Reliable performance is the key requirement for instruments used in offshore moored buoys for cyclone monitoring, as under performance of the sensors can have a serious impact on the societal protection, and in addition, lead to costly repair and reinstallations. The instrument selection and application practices are based on the experiences of the global scientific community, and their performances are monitored based on IEC61508 standards. Reliability modeling based on experiences in the operation and maintenance of moored surface buoys for approximately two decades has identified that the sensor suite used for cyclone monitoring has a Mean Time Between Failure of 0.6 years, which is the basis of the implemented reliability centered maintenance strategies. As this is the first attempt to study the performance of such moored buoy instruments which have cumulatively clocked more than 7.3 million demanding offshore instrument-hours, the data presented shall serve as input for the offshore environmental instrument system design.

Strategic Environmental Assessment practices in European small islands: Insights from Azores and Orkney islands

Polido A, João E, Ramos TB. Strategic Environmental Assessment practices in European small islands: Insights from Azores and Orkney islands. Environmental Impact Assessment Review [Internet]. 2016 ;57:18 - 30. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195925515001195
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The literature concerning Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) often refers to the importance of context-specific approaches. However, there is a lack of systematised and consistent studies that enhance tailor-made SEA practices and procedures. Small islands are bounded units of study which may help explore SEA theory and practice in special territories. Small islands present particular features and unique values, such as, small size and population, geographic isolation, limited resources and vulnerable ecosystems. Hence, the main goal of this research was to profile SEA practices and procedures in European small islands and provide a background for future research aiming to improve context-specific SEA applications. To achieve this goal, an exploratory case study was developed using Azores (Portugal) and Orkney (Scotland) archipelagos. An analysis of the corresponding mainland was also carried out to contextualise both case studies. The data collection was achieved through a qualitative content analysis of 43 Environmental Reports. The research found that there is not an SEA context-specific approach used within these European small islands, including guidelines, assessment topics, assessment techniques, follow-up and stakeholders engagement. The debate concerning specific approaches to small islands must be re-focused on the enhancement of SEA capacity-building amongst different stakeholders (including decision-makers), on the development and implementation of collaborative approaches, and on the exchange of knowledge and experiences between small islands networks.

Signature analysis of satellite derived SSHa, SST and chlorophyll concentration and their linkage with marine fishery resources

Solanki HU, Bhatpuria D, Chauhan P. Signature analysis of satellite derived SSHa, SST and chlorophyll concentration and their linkage with marine fishery resources. Journal of Marine Systems [Internet]. 2015 ;150:12 - 21. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924796315000883
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

This study aims to understand patterns, persistence and interrelationship between satellite derived oceanic variables. Time series near-synchronous sea surface height anomaly (SSHa), chlorophyll-a concentration (CC) and sea surface temperature (SST) derived from Topex/Poseidon altimeter, Oceansat-OCM and NOAA-AVHRR, respectively, were used for integrative signature analysis. Three dimensional surface and two dimensional spatial profiles of these variables were generated to understand the spatio-temporal variability. SST and SSHa were co-varying and CC shows an inverse correlation. The time series data analysis indicated bio-physical closely coupled processes. The patterns of variability in CC signatures were found to be associated with SSHa and SST signatures. High fish catch in terms of CPUE (catch-per-unit-effort) were found in low SSHa and corresponding high chlorophyll concentration area during the year 1998–2004 in the Northern Arabian Sea. SSHa signatures were detected earlier than CC and SST. Lower SSHa signatures were inferred as advanced information of the occurrence of productive sites in near future. This study would be useful to understand large scale bio-physical coupled processes for fishery resources exploration.

Challenges in Coastal Spatial Data Infrastructure implementation: A review

Idrees MOludare Id. Challenges in Coastal Spatial Data Infrastructure implementation: A review. South African Journal of Geomatics [Internet]. 2015 ;4(4):369. Available from: http://www.ajol.info/index.php/sajg/article/view/125781
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The ability to cope with the complexity surrounding the coastal zone requires an integrated approach for  sustainable socio-economic development and environmental management. The concept of integrated coastal  zone management (ICZM) was advanced in response to this. In line with the success story of spatial data  infrastructure (SDI), initiatives are currently emerging to develop SDI for marine and coastal environment. The aim of this paper is to review emerging initiatives so as to identify the problems faced with  implementation and discuss the way forward. The result may support stakeholders, policy makers, academia, and the government to leverage on the experience of others for a robust and sustainable policy and action plans on coastal management.

Space station image captures a red tide ciliate bloom at high spectral and spatial resolution

Dierssen H, McManus GB, Chlus A, Qiu D, Gao B-C, Lin S. Space station image captures a red tide ciliate bloom at high spectral and spatial resolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2015 . Available from: http://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1512538112
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Mesodinium rubrum is a globally distributed nontoxic ciliate that is known to produce intense red-colored blooms using enslaved chloroplasts from its algal prey. Although frequent enough to have been observed by Darwin, blooms of M. rubrum are notoriously difficult to quantify because M. rubrum can aggregate into massive clouds of rusty-red water in a very short time due to its high growth rates and rapid swimming behavior and can disaggregate just as quickly by vertical or horizontal dispersion. A September 2012 hyperspectral image from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean sensor aboard the International Space Station captured a dense red tide of M. rubrum (106 cells per liter) in surface waters of western Long Island Sound. Genetic data confirmed the identity of the chloroplast as a cryptophyte that was actively photosynthesizing. Microscopy indicated extremely high abundance of its yellow fluorescing signature pigment phycoerythrin. Spectral absorption and fluorescence features were related to ancillary photosynthetic pigments unique to this organism that cannot be observed with traditional satellites. Cell abundance was estimated at a resolution of 100 m using an algorithm based on the distinctive yellow fluorescence of phycoerythrin. Future development of hyperspectral satellites will allow for better enumeration of bloom-forming coastal plankton, the associated physical mechanisms, and contributions to marine productivity.

Routledge Handbook of Ocean Resources and Management

Smith HD, de Vivero JLuis Suár, Agardy TS eds. Routledge Handbook of Ocean Resources and Management. Taylor & Francis Group; 2015 p. 612 pp. Available from: https://www.routledge.com/products/9780415531757
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Book

This comprehensive handbook provides a global overview of ocean resources and management by focusing on critical issues relating to human development and the marine environment, their interrelationships as expressed through the uses of the sea as a resource, and the regional expression of these themes. The underlying approach is geographical, with prominence given to the biosphere, political arrangements and regional patterns – all considered to be especially crucial to the human understanding required for the use and management of the world's oceans.

Part one addresses key themes in our knowledge of relationships between people and the sea on a global scale, including economic and political issues, and understanding and managing marine environments. Part two provides a systematic review of the uses of the sea, grouped into food, ocean space, materials and energy, and the sea as an environmental resource. Part three on the geography of the sea considers management strategies especially related to the state system, and regional management developments in both core economic regions and the developing periphery. The primary themes within each chapter are governance (including institutional and legal bases); policy – sets of ideas governing management; and management, both technical and general.

Levels and drivers of fishers’ compliance with marine protected areas

Arias A, Cinner JE, Jones RE, Pressey RL. Levels and drivers of fishers’ compliance with marine protected areas. Ecology and Society [Internet]. 2015 ;20(4). Available from: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol20/iss4/art19/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Effective conservation depends largely on people’s compliance with regulations. We investigate compliance through the lens of fishers’ compliance with marine protected areas (MPAs). MPAs are widely used tools for marine conservation and fisheries management. Studies show that compliance alone is a strong predictor of fish biomass within MPAs. Hence, fishers’ compliance is critical for MPA effectiveness. However, there are few empirical studies showing what factors influence fishers’ compliance with MPAs. Without such information, conservation planners and managers have limited opportunities to provide effective interventions. By studying 12 MPAs in a developing country (Costa Rica), we demonstrate the role that different variables have on fishers’ compliance with MPAs. Particularly, we found that compliance levels perceived by resource users were higher in MPAs (1) with multiple livelihoods, (2) where government efforts against illegal fishing were effective, (3) where fishing was allowed but regulated, (4) where people were more involved in decisions, and (5) that were smaller. We also provide a novel and practical measure of compliance: a compound variable formed by the number illegal fishers and their illegal fishing effort. Our study underlines the centrality of people’s behavior in nature conservation and the importance of grounding decision making on the social and institutional realities of each location.

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