2016-04-20

Importance of ocean salinity for climate and habitability

Cullum J, Stevens DP, Joshi MM. Importance of ocean salinity for climate and habitability. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2016 . Available from: http://www.pnas.org/content/113/16/4278.abstract.html?etoc
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Modeling studies of terrestrial extrasolar planetary climates are now including the effects of ocean circulation due to a recognition of the importance of oceans for climate; indeed, the peak equator-pole ocean heat transport on Earth peaks at almost half that of the atmosphere. However, such studies have made the assumption that fundamental oceanic properties, such as salinity, temperature, and depth, are similar to Earth. This assumption results in Earth-like circulations: a meridional overturning with warm water moving poleward at the surface, being cooled, sinking at high latitudes, and traveling equatorward at depth. Here it is shown that an exoplanetary ocean with a different salinity can circulate in the opposite direction: an equatorward flow of polar water at the surface, sinking in the tropics, and filling the deep ocean with warm water. This alternative flow regime results in a dramatic warming in the polar regions, demonstrated here using both a conceptual model and an ocean general circulation model. These results highlight the importance of ocean salinity for exoplanetary climate and consequent habitability and the need for its consideration in future studies.

Estimating and mitigating the discard mortality of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in the Gulf of Maine recreational rod-and-reel fishery

Capizzano CW, Mandelman JW, Hoffman WS, Dean MJ, Zemeckis DR, Benoît HP, Kneebone J, Jones E, Stettner MJ, Buchan NJ, et al. Estimating and mitigating the discard mortality of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in the Gulf of Maine recreational rod-and-reel fishery. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2016 :fsw058. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/04/16/icesjms.fsw058
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In recent years, the recreational contribution to the total catch of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in the Gulf of Maine (GOM) has increased with recreational discards outnumbering recreational landings by 2:1. However, the discard mortality (DM) rate of cod released in the recreational fishery remains poorly understood, thus contributing to the uncertainty in stock assessments and fishery management plans. The current study examined the capture-related factors most detrimental to cod DM in the GOM recreational rod-and-reel fishery. Atlantic cod (n = 640; 26.0–72.0 cm) were angled from June–October 2013 on southern Jeffreys Ledge in the western GOM using fishing gear representative of the local recreational fishery. A subset (n = 136) was also tagged with pressure-sensing acoustic transmitters before being released into an acoustic receiver array (n = 31) deployed to monitor survival up to 94 days. To properly model DM up to the fishery-wide level, all cod were visually assessed for capture-related injuries according to a four-level injury score index. Mean tackle-specific DM rates of 15.4 and 21.2% were estimated for bait- and jig-captured cod, respectively, with an overall 16.5% mean DM rate for the 2013 GOM recreational cod fishery. Twenty-nine cod tagged with acoustic transmitters were identified as dead, where the majority (∼90%) died within 16 h post-capture. Upon evaluation with a specifically adapted parametric survival analysis, greater incidence of mortality was attributed to the capture and handling process (rather than release) for moderately and severely injured cod. Based on the capture-related factors associated with the highest injury rates, we recommend minimizing fight and handling times, avoiding areas with small cod, educating inexperienced anglers, and favouring bait over jigs to mitigate mortality. Results will continue to inform the development of fishery management plans and enhance survival through dissemination of “best practice” techniques to fishery stakeholders.

Water quality criteria for an acidifying ocean: Challenges and opportunities for improvement

Weisberg SB, Bednaršek N, Feely RA, Chan F, Boehm AB, Sutula M, Ruesink JL, Hales B, Largier JL, Newton JA. Water quality criteria for an acidifying ocean: Challenges and opportunities for improvement. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2016 ;126:31 - 41. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569116300357
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Acidification has sparked discussion about whether regulatory agencies should place coastal waters on the Clean Water Act 303(d) impaired water bodies list. Here we describe scientific challenges in assessing impairment with existing data, exploring use of both pH and biological criteria. Application of pH criteria is challenging because present coastal pH levels fall within the allowable criteria range, but the existing criteria allow for pH levels that are known to cause extensive biological damage. Moreover, some states express their water quality criteria as change from natural conditions, but the spatio-temporal distribution and quality of existing coastal pH data are insufficient to define natural condition. Biological criteria require that waters be of sufficient quality to support resident biological communities and are relevant because a number of biological communities have declined over the last several decades. However, the scientific challenge is differentiating those declines from natural population cycles and positively associating them with acidification-related water quality stress. We present two case studies, one for pteropods and one for oysters, which illustrate the opportunities, challenges and uncertainties associated with implementing biological criteria. The biggest challenge associated with these biological assessments is lack of co-location between long-term biological and chemical monitoring, which inhibits the ability to connect biological response with an acidification stressor. Developing new, ecologically relevant water quality criteria for acidification and augmenting coastal water monitoring at spatio-temporal scales appropriate to those criteria would enhance opportunities for effective use of water quality regulations.

A spatio-temporal ecosystem model to simulate fishing management plans: A case of study in the Gulf of Gabes (Tunisia)

Halouani G, Abdou K, Hattab T, Romdhane MSalah, Lasram FBen Rais, Le Loc’h F. A spatio-temporal ecosystem model to simulate fishing management plans: A case of study in the Gulf of Gabes (Tunisia). Marine Policy [Internet]. 2016 ;69:62 - 72. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X16300677
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The Gulf of Gabes located in southern Tunisia is one of the most productive ecosystems in the Mediterranean Sea. Despite its ecological importance, it is subject to high fishing pressure affecting the different components of the ecosystem. Given the multispecies, multigear nature of the fishery, there is a need to manage trade-offs between environmental and economic objectives. In this study, an Ecospace model was developed based on the previously constructed Ecopath model of the Gulf of Gabes and calibrated for the period 1995–2008 to investigate the response of the ecosystem to a set of alternative spatial management scenarios. These scenarios were derived from the current fishery regulation owing the important interest expressed by local fishery managers to assess new management measures. The results showed for each management scenario how bottom trawling and coastal fishing impact the different trophic groups and the complexity of interaction between these two fishing activities. Furthermore, spatially explicit simulations were performed to identify regions where the management measures are effective. Results suggested that for some trophic groups, these regions are well-defined which would be interesting to propose more accurate spatial measures. Finally, several indicators were calculated to evaluate the proposed management plans and provide managers with a straightforward set of decision rules to describe the potential trade-offs and fulfill both fisheries and conservation management objectives in the context of an ecosystem approach. The decision rules were based on observed trends to reduce uncertainty relative to the model complexity and provide consistent advice to decision-makers.

Uncertainties in coastal ocean color products: Impacts of spatial sampling

Pahlevan N, Sarkar S, Franz BA. Uncertainties in coastal ocean color products: Impacts of spatial sampling. Remote Sensing of Environment [Internet]. 2016 ;181:14 - 26. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0034425716301146
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

With increasing demands for ocean color (OC) products with improved accuracy and well characterized, per-retrieval uncertainty budgets, it is vital to decompose overall estimated errors into their primary components. Amongst various contributing elements (e.g., instrument calibration, atmospheric correction, inversion algorithms) in the uncertainty of an OC observation, less attention has been paid to uncertainties associated with spatial sampling. In this paper, we simulate MODIS (aboard both Aqua and Terra) and VIIRS OC products using 30 m resolution OC products derived from the Operational Land Imager (OLI) aboard Landsat-8, to examine impacts of spatial sampling on both cross-sensor product intercomparisons and in-situ validations of Rrsproducts in coastal waters. Various OLI OC products representing different productivity levels and in-water spatial features were scanned for one full orbital-repeat cycle of each ocean color satellite. While some view-angle dependent differences in simulated Aqua-MODIS and VIIRS were observed, the average uncertainties (absolute) in product intercomparisons (due to differences in spatial sampling) at regional scales are found to be 1.8%, 1.9%, 2.4%, 4.3%, 2.7%, 1.8%, and 4% for the Rrs(443), Rrs(482), Rrs(561), Rrs(655), Chla, Kd(482), and bbp(655) products, respectively. It is also found that, depending on in-water spatial variability and the sensor's footprint size, the errors for an in-situ validation station in coastal areas can reach as high as ± 18%. We conclude that a) expected biases induced by the spatial sampling in product intercomparisons are mitigated when products are averaged over at least 7 km × 7 km areas, b) VIIRS observations, with improved consistency in cross-track spatial sampling, yield more precise calibration/validation statistics than that of MODIS, and c) use of a single pixel centered on in-situ coastal stations provides an optimal sampling size for validation efforts. These findings will have implications for enhancing our understanding of uncertainties in ocean color retrievals and for planning of future ocean color missions and the associated calibration/validation exercises.

Elemental analysis of mussels and possible health risks arising from their consumption as a food: The case of Boka Kotorska Bay, Adriatic Sea

Tanaskovski B, Jović M, Mandić M, Pezo L, Degetto S, Stanković S. Elemental analysis of mussels and possible health risks arising from their consumption as a food: The case of Boka Kotorska Bay, Adriatic Sea. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety [Internet]. 2016 ;130:65 - 73. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0147651316301142
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

he present study investigated the essential and non-essential elements in cultivated and wild mussels and assessed the health risk arising from their consumption as an impact of rapid growth and intensive production of Mytilus galloprovincialis in the mussel farms of the Boka Kotorska Bay. The concentrations of macro, micro, nonessential and even the small amounts of potentially toxic elements in the cultivated and wild mussels were influenced by industry, tourism and the geohydrology of the Bay. In the case of cultivated mussels, the limiting factor, i.e., the element the elevated concentration of which restricts mussels consumption, was Zr, while in the case of wild mussels the limiting factors were Cr and As. The sites with cultivated mussels stand out as sites with the highest calculated element pollution index, the total hazard index and with higher estimated risk to the health of consumers.

Monitoring boat-based recreational fishing effort at a nearshore artificial reef with a shore-based camera

Keller K, Steffe AS, Lowry M, Murphy JJ, Suthers IM. Monitoring boat-based recreational fishing effort at a nearshore artificial reef with a shore-based camera. Fisheries Research [Internet]. 2016 ;181:84 - 92. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165783616300935
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Recreational fishing effort was quantified at a 700 m3 steel artificial reef (AR) off coastal Sydney with a shore-based camera (06:00–18:00) over a two-year period. Stratified random sampling was used to select days for analysis of fishing effort from digital images. Fishing effort estimates derived from the digital images were adjusted to account for visibility bias using information from a validation study. The levels of effort recorded in the first two seasons were low as the AR had been recently deployed and colonization of the AR by sessile organisms and fishes was still occurring. The effort intensity (fisher hours per square kilometer) at the Sydney AR was compared with three South Australian ARs and 14 estuarine fisheries in New South Wales (NSW) to provide context for the study. Effort intensity at the AR was found to be up to 12 times higher than that recorded from some estuarine fisheries in NSW. Conversely, the levels of effort intensity at two South Australian ARs were much higher compared to those at the Sydney AR site in both survey years. Effort intensity comparisons showed that the relative levels of usage at Australian ARs were higher than those recorded from estuarine fisheries. The Sydney AR provides diverse fishing opportunities that may be concentrated in a small area. Camera-based technologies can provide a solution for cost effective monitoring of AR sites, providing the accuracy of fishing effort information derived from camera images is validated. Our study has broad implications for other recreational ARs, including many future deployments planned for eastern Australia.

Modeling landings profiles of fishing vessels: An application of Self-Organizing Maps to VMS and logbook data

Russo T, Carpentieri P, Fiorentino F, Arneri E, Scardi M, Cioffi A, Cataudella S. Modeling landings profiles of fishing vessels: An application of Self-Organizing Maps to VMS and logbook data. Fisheries Research [Internet]. 2016 ;181:34 - 47. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016578361630100X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Logbook data constitute a key element within the electronic recording and reporting system of the European Fisheries Control Technologies Framework and are used to record, report, process, store and send information about fishing operations, including landings and fishing gear. A relevant application of logbook data is to account for the heterogeneity of fishing practices (e.g., by gear or métier), which is a key aspect of the Common Fishery Policy. However, despite their importance, few published studies have explored the potential and pitfalls of logbook data, even in combination with other powerful data sources such as the Vessel Monitoring System (VMS). Here, a new approach to characterizing the composition of landings for the different types of gear based on the use of Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs − a particular type of Artificial Neural Network) is applied to the Italian fleet logbook dataset. The SOM is trained on the landings composition and the resulting patterns are interpreted using some measures obtained from the analysis of the corresponding VMS data. Namely, the mean sea bottom depth and the area of activity are obtained for each fishing trip. Moreover, the ability of the trained SOM to predict gear from landings is tested using a new dataset. The trained SOM classifies logbook records according to the ecological, taxonomical, and trophic characteristics of the species caught, and the depth of fishing activities plays an important role in diversifying the landings associated with certain widely used fishing gear such as the bottom otter trawl. The clustering of SOM units allows the identification of a set of 12 groups, which are strongly related to the types of gear used by the Italian fleet. Furthermore, the trained SOM shows a high ability to recognize gear from logbook data, thus confirming the robustness of the landings profiles detected.

An empirical evaluation of spatial value transfer methods for identifying cultural ecosystem services

Brown G, Pullar D, Hausner VHelene. An empirical evaluation of spatial value transfer methods for identifying cultural ecosystem services. Ecological Indicators [Internet]. 2016 ;69:1 - 11. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X16301571
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A significant barrier to the assessment of ecosystem services is a lack of primary data, especially for cultural ecosystem services. Spatial value transfer, also known as benefits transfer, is a method to identify the probable locations of ecosystem services based on empirical spatial associations found in other geographic locations. To date, there has been no systematic evaluation of spatial value transfer methods for cultural ecosystem services identified through participatory mapping methods. This research paper addresses this knowledge gap by examining key variables that influence value transfer for cultural ecosystem services: (1) the geographic setting, (2) the type of ecosystem services, and (3) the land cover data selected for value-transfer. Spatial data from public participation GIS (PPGIS) processes in two regions in Norway were used to evaluate spatial value transfer where the actual mapped distribution of cultural ecosystem values were compared to maps generated using value transfer coefficients. Six cultural ecosystem values were evaluated using two different land cover classification systems GlobCover (300 m resolution) and CORINE (100 m resolution). Value transfer maps based on the distribution of mapped ecosystem values produced strongly correlated results to primary data in both regions. Value transfer for cultural ecosystems appear valid under conditions where the primary data and value transfer regions have similar physical landscapes, the social and cultural values of the human populations are similar, and the primary data sample sizes are large and unbiased. We suggest the use of non-economic value transfer coefficients derived from participatory mapping as the current best approach for estimating the importance and spatial distribution of cultural ecosystem services.

Global marine pollutants inhibit P-glycoprotein: Environmental levels, inhibitory effects, and cocrystal structure

Nicklisch SCT, Rees SD, McGrath AP, T. kirmak G, Bonito LT, Vermeer LM, Cregger C, Loewen G, Sandin S, Chang G, et al. Global marine pollutants inhibit P-glycoprotein: Environmental levels, inhibitory effects, and cocrystal structure. Science Advances [Internet]. 2016 ;2(4). Available from: http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/4/e1600001
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The world’s oceans are a global reservoir of persistent organic pollutants to which humans and other animals are exposed. Although it is well known that these pollutants are potentially hazardous to human and environmental health, their impacts remain incompletely understood. We examined how persistent organic pollutants interact with the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an evolutionarily conserved defense protein that is essential for protection against environmental toxicants. We identified specific congeners of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers that inhibit mouse and human P-gp, and determined their environmental levels in yellowfin tuna from the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, we solved the cocrystal structure of P-gp bound to one of these inhibitory pollutants, PBDE (polybrominated diphenyl ether)–100, providing the first view of pollutant binding to a drug transporter. The results demonstrate the potential for specific binding and inhibition of mammalian P-gp by ubiquitous congeners of persistent organic pollutants present in fish and other foods, and argue for further consideration of transporter inhibition in the assessment of the risk of exposure to these chemicals.

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