2016-08-24

The effects of bycatch reduction devices on diamondback terrapin and blue crab catch in the North Carolina commercial crab fishery

Chavez S, Williard ASouthwood. The effects of bycatch reduction devices on diamondback terrapin and blue crab catch in the North Carolina commercial crab fishery. Fisheries Research [Internet]. 2017 ;186:94 - 101. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165783616302636
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) is endemic to marshes, coves, and tidal creeks on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. Currently, the terrapin is listed as a species of special concern in several states where one of the prominent threats to populations is the drowning of terrapins in commercial crab pots. Bycatch reduction devices (BRDs) that narrow the funnel opening on crab pots exclude terrapins, but BRDs face opposition from the fishing industry due to fears that they will decrease target species catch. The primary goals of this research were to examine the efficacy of two sizes of BRDs in excluding terrapins from crab pots and to assess the impact of BRDs on blue crab catch. Crab pots were deployed in paired and triplicate designs at estuarine sites along the central and southern coast of North Carolina in the summers of 2012 and 2013. A total of 4039 legal sized blue crabs and 14 terrapins were captured over the course of the study. Bycatch reduction devices did not have a statistically significant effect on catch rates or carapace width of legal-sized blue crabs. Thirteen of the 14 captured terrapins were in control pots, and one male terrapin was captured in a pot equipped with a large size BRD. An integrated approach that combines data on the spatial ecology and demography of terrapins with information on the most appropriate BRD dimensions for terrapin exclusion is most likely to succeed in addressing the issue of terrapin bycatch.

Management of estuarine beaches on the Amazon coast though the application of recreational carrying capacity indices

de Sousa RCorrêa, Pereira LCajueiro C, da Costa RMarinho, Jiménez JA. Management of estuarine beaches on the Amazon coast though the application of recreational carrying capacity indices. Tourism Management [Internet]. 2017 ;59:216 - 225. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261517716301145
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The purpose of this paper is to determine the Recreational Carrying Capacity of three estuarine beaches (Colares, Marudá and Murubira) on the Amazon coast of Brazil, based on the combined assessment of natural conditions and visitor facilities. In the final analysis, the carrying capacity of Colares beach was estimated to be 1089 visitors per day, and that of Murubira beach, 238 visitors per day. At Marudá beach, however, the inadequate quality of the water resulted in an RCC of zero, indicating that the beach should not be visited for recreational use. The results of this study may provide a valuable diagnostic tool for the development of future state and municipal coastal management programs. We believe that the procedures adopted in this study are applicable to other estuarine beaches on the Amazon coast, as well as in other estuarine beaches elsewhere with similar natural characteristics.

Fishing down nutrients on coral reefs

Allgeier JE, Valdivia A, Cox C, Layman CA. Fishing down nutrients on coral reefs. Nature Communications [Internet]. 2016 ;7:12461. Available from: http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2016/160816/ncomms12461/full/ncomms12461.html
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Fishing is widely considered a leading cause of biodiversity loss in marine environments, but the potential effect on ecosystem processes, such as nutrient fluxes, is less explored. Here, we test how fishing on Caribbean coral reefs influences biodiversity and ecosystem functions provided by the fish community, that is, fish-mediated nutrient capacity. Specifically, we modelled five processes of nutrient storage (in biomass) and supply (via excretion) of nutrients, as well as a measure of their multifunctionality, onto 143 species of coral reef fishes across 110 coral reef fish communities. These communities span a gradient from extreme fishing pressure to protected areas with little to no fishing. We find that in fished sites fish-mediated nutrient capacity is reduced almost 50%, despite no substantial changes in the number of species. Instead, changes in community size and trophic structure were the primary cause of shifts in ecosystem function. These findings suggest that a broader perspective that incorporates predictable impacts of fishing pressure on ecosystem function is imperative for effective coral reef conservation and management.

Active acoustic tracking suggests that soft sediment fishes can show site attachment: a preliminary assessment of the movement patterns of the blue-spotted flathead (Platycephalus caeruleopunctatus)

Fetterplace LC, Davis AR, Neilson JM, Taylor MD, Knott NA. Active acoustic tracking suggests that soft sediment fishes can show site attachment: a preliminary assessment of the movement patterns of the blue-spotted flathead (Platycephalus caeruleopunctatus). Animal Biotelemetry [Internet]. 2016 ;4(1). Available from: https://animalbiotelemetry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40317-016-0107-6
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Background

It is generally considered that on relatively homogenous marine soft sediment habitats, such as sand, fish are unlikely to show site attachment. This poses challenges for management and the evaluation of the efficacy of marine protected areas, in which soft sediments often make up more than 70 % of habitats. The blue-spotted flathead is a commercially and recreationally targeted species found on soft sediments in coastal marine waters of south-eastern Australia. There are no published data on its movement patterns. Here, using active acoustic telemetry, we aim to (a) quantify movement and habitat use of blue-spotted flathead, (b) compare area usage to no-take sanctuary zone size and (c) obtain data to aid in the design of a large passive receiver array to be used in long-term comprehensive tracking of soft sediment fish.

Results

Three of five blue-spotted flathead that were tagged exhibited strong site attachment and were detected close to their release points for the entire 60-day study period. The two other fish were not detected after 4 and 25 days and were likely to have moved out of the study area (search radius ≈ 3 km). For the three fish tracked over 60 days, the area used was compact (mean ± SE = 0.021 km2 ± 0.037) and two patterns of movement were apparent: (1) a small activity space used in its entirety each day (two fish) and (2) a larger activity space in which a separate area is utilised each day (one fish).

Conclusions

Our study is the first to document the movement of blue-spotted flathead, and these preliminary results demonstrate two broad movement patterns shown by this species on soft sediments in Jervis Bay. Over the course of 60 days, a majority of fish in this study showed strong site attachment; however, a number of fish also made larger-scale movements. Finally, our study suggests that a tightly spaced, passive acoustic array would provide meaningful results for this species, although strategically placed receivers outside this array would be required to detect any longer range movements.

Response of a salt marsh microbial community to antibiotic contamination

Fernandes JP, C. Almeida MR, M. Basto CP, Mucha AP. Response of a salt marsh microbial community to antibiotic contamination. Science of The Total Environment [Internet]. 2015 ;532:301 - 308. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969715302242
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Journal Article

Salt marsh plants and associated microorganisms can have an important role in contaminant removal from estuaries, through bioremediation processes. Nevertheless, the interaction between emerging contaminants, namely antibiotics, and plant–microorganism associations in estuarine environment are still scarcely known. In this vein, the aim of the present study was to evaluate, in controlled conditions, the response of a salt marsh plant–microorganism association to a contamination with a veterinary antibiotic. For that a salt marsh plant (Phragmites australis) and its respective rhizosediment were collected in a temperate estuary (Lima estuary, NW Portugal) and exposed for 7 days to enrofloxacin (ENR) under different nutritional conditions in sediment elutriates. Response was evaluated in terms of ENR removal and changes in microbial community structure (evaluated by ARISA) and abundance (estimated by DAPI). In general, no significant changes were observed in microbial abundance. Changes in bacterial richness and diversity were observed but only in unplanted systems. However, multivariate analysis of ARISA profiles showed significant effect of both the presence of plant and type of treatment on the microbial community structure, with significant differences among all treatment groups. In addition, plants and associated microorganisms presented a potential for antibiotic removal that, although highly dependent on their nutritional status, can be a valuable asset to recover impacted areas such as estuarine ones.

Social capital as a key determinant of perceived benefits of community-based marine protected areas

Diedrich A, Stoeckl N, Gurney GG, Esparon M, Pollnac R. Social capital as a key determinant of perceived benefits of community-based marine protected areas. Conservation Biology [Internet]. 2016 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cobi.12808/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Globally, marine protected areas (MPAs) have been relatively unsuccessful in meeting biodiversity objectives. In order to be effective, they require some alteration of people's use and access to marine resources, which they will resist if they do not perceive associated benefits. Stakeholder support is crucial to ecological success of MPAs, and support is likely to depend on their capacity to adapt to and benefit from MPAs. We examined the influence of social adaptive capacity (SAC) on perceived benefits of MPAs in Siquijor, Philippines, in the Coral Triangle. This region has significant biodiversity and is home to over 120 million people, many of them dependent on marine resources for food and income. It is a hotspot for MPAs, most of which are managed under decentralized governance systems. We collected data from 540 households in 19 villages with associated MPAs. We evaluated the influence of multiple SAC variables on perceived benefits using decision trees and qualitatively analyzed this relationship with respect to types and recipients of benefits. Our models revealed the key role of social capital, particularly trust in leadership, in influencing perceptions of benefits. Further, path analysis revealed that perceptions of distributional equity were a key mechanism through which social capital affected perceived MPA benefits. Identifying approaches to building social capital and equity within communities could lead to more effective management of MPAs requiring fewer resources than other approaches such as enforcement. Future research could build understanding of the influence and defining characteristics of different types of social capital and its distribution within communities on successful outcomes of MPAs and other marine resource management approaches.

Interspecific Hybridization in Pilot Whales and Asymmetric Genetic Introgression in Northern Globicephala melas under the Scenario of Global Warming

Miralles L, Oremus M, Silva MA, Planes S, Garcia-Vazquez E. Interspecific Hybridization in Pilot Whales and Asymmetric Genetic Introgression in Northern Globicephala melas under the Scenario of Global Warming. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(8):e0160080. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0160080
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Pilot whales are two cetacean species (Globicephala melas and Gmacrorhynchus) whose distributions are correlated with water temperature and partially overlap in some areas like the North Atlantic Ocean. In the context of global warming, distribution range shifts are expected to occur in species affected by temperature. Consequently, a northward displacement of the tropical pilot whale Gmacrorynchus is expected, eventually leading to increased secondary contact areas and opportunities for interspecific hybridization. Here, we describe genetic evidences of recurrent hybridization between pilot whales in northeast Atlantic Ocean. Based on mitochondrial DNA sequences and microsatellite loci, asymmetric introgression of Gmacrorhynchus genes into Gmelas was observed. For the latter species, a significant correlation was found between historical population growth rate estimates and paleotemperature oscillations. Introgressive hybridization, current temperature increases and lower genetic variation in Gmelas suggest that this species could be at risk in its northern range. Under increasing environmental and human-mediated stressors in the North Atlantic Ocean, it seems recommendable to develop a conservation program for Gmelas.

Terrestrial and Marine Foraging Strategies of an Opportunistic Seabird Species Breeding in the Wadden Sea

Garthe S, Schwemmer P, Paiva VH, Corman A-M, Fock HO, Voigt CC, Adler S. Terrestrial and Marine Foraging Strategies of an Opportunistic Seabird Species Breeding in the Wadden Sea. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(8):e0159630. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0159630
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Lesser black-backed gulls Larus fuscus are considered to be mainly pelagic. We assessed the importance of different landscape elements (open sea, tidal flats and inland) by comparing marine and terrestrial foraging behaviours in lesser black-backed gulls breeding along the coast of the southern North Sea. We attached GPS data loggers to eight incubating birds and collected information on diet and habitat use. The loggers recorded data for 10–19 days to allow flight-path reconstruction. Lesser black-backed gulls foraged in both offshore and inland areas, but rarely on tidal flats. Targets and directions were similar among all eight individuals. Foraging trips (n = 108) lasted 0.5–26.4 h (mean 8.7 h), and ranges varied from 3.0–79.9 km (mean 30.9 km). The total distance travelled per foraging trip ranged from 7.5–333.6 km (mean 97.9 km). Trips out to sea were significantly more variable in all parameters than inland trips. Presence in inland areas was closely associated with daylight, whereas trips to sea occurred at day and night, but mostly at night. The most common items in pellets were grass (48%), insects (38%), fish (28%), litter (26%) and earthworms (20%). There was a significant relationship between the carbon and nitrogen isotope signals in blood and the proportional time each individual spent foraging at sea/land. On land, gulls preferentially foraged on bare ground, with significantly higher use of potato fields and significantly less use of grassland. The flight patterns of lesser black-backed gulls at sea overlapped with fishing-vessel distribution, including small beam trawlers fishing for shrimps in coastal waters close to the colony and large beam-trawlers fishing for flatfish at greater distances. Our data show that individuals made intensive use of the anthropogenic landscape and seascape, indicating that lesser black-backed gulls are not a predominantly marine species during the incubation period.

Preservation Obscures Pelagic Deep-Sea Fish Diversity: Doubling the Number of Sole-Bearing Opisthoproctids and Resurrection of the Genus Monacoa (Opisthoproctidae, Argentiniformes)

Poulsen JYde, Sado T, Hahn C, Byrkjedal I, Moku M, Miya M. Preservation Obscures Pelagic Deep-Sea Fish Diversity: Doubling the Number of Sole-Bearing Opisthoproctids and Resurrection of the Genus Monacoa (Opisthoproctidae, Argentiniformes). PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(8):e0159762. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0159762
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The family Opisthoproctidae (barreleyes) constitutes one of the most peculiar looking and unknown deep-sea fish groups in terms of taxonomy and specialized adaptations. All the species in the family are united by the possession of tubular eyes, with one distinct lineage exhibiting also drastic shortening of the body. Two new species of the mesopelagic opisthoproctid mirrorbelly genus Monacoa are described based on pigmentation patterns of the “sole”—a unique vertebrate structure used in the reflection and control of bioluminescence in most short-bodied forms. Different pigmentation patterns of the soles, previously noted as intraspecific variations based on preserved specimens, are here shown species-specific and likely used for communication in addition to counter-illumination of down-welling sunlight. The genus Monacoa is resurrected from Opisthoproctus based on extensive morphological synaphomorphies pertaining to the anal fin and snout. Doubling the species diversity within sole-bearing opisthoproctids, including recognition of two genera, is unambiguously supported by mitogenomic DNA sequence data. Regular fixation with formalin and alcohol preservation is shown problematic concerning the retention of species-specific pigmentation patterns. Examination or photos of fresh material before formalin fixation is shown paramount for correct species recognition of sole-bearing opisthoproctids—a relatively unknown issue concerning species diversity in the deep-sea pelagic realm.

Estimates of the Direct Effect of Seawater pH on the Survival Rate of Species Groups in the California Current Ecosystem

D. Busch S, McElhany P. Estimates of the Direct Effect of Seawater pH on the Survival Rate of Species Groups in the California Current Ecosystem. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(8):e0160669. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0160669
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ocean acidification (OA) has the potential to restructure ecosystems due to variation in species sensitivity to the projected changes in ocean carbon chemistry. Ecological models can be forced with scenarios of OA to help scientists, managers, and other stakeholders understand how ecosystems might change. We present a novel methodology for developing estimates of species sensitivity to OA that are regionally specific, and applied the method to the California Current ecosystem. To do so, we built a database of all published literature on the sensitivity of temperate species to decreased pH. This database contains 393 papers on 285 species and 89 multi-species groups from temperate waters around the world. Research on urchins and oysters and on adult life stages dominates the literature. Almost a third of the temperate species studied to date occur in the California Current. However, most laboratory experiments use control pH conditions that are too high to represent average current chemistry conditions in the portion of the California Current water column where the majority of the species live. We developed estimates of sensitivity to OA for functional groups in the ecosystem, which can represent single species or taxonomically diverse groups of hundreds of species. We based these estimates on the amount of available evidence derived from published studies on species sensitivity, how well this evidence could inform species sensitivity in the California Current ecosystem, and the agreement of the available evidence for a species/species group. This approach is similar to that taken by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to characterize certainty when summarizing scientific findings. Most functional groups (26 of 34) responded negatively to OA conditions, but when uncertainty in sensitivity was considered, only 11 groups had relationships that were consistently negative. Thus, incorporating certainty about the sensitivity of species and functional groups to OA is an important part of developing robust scenarios for ecosystem projections.

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