2016-09-28

Spatial Overlap of Grey Seals and Fisheries in Irish Waters, Some New Insights Using Telemetry Technology and VMS

Cronin M, Gerritsen H, Reid D, Jessopp M. Spatial Overlap of Grey Seals and Fisheries in Irish Waters, Some New Insights Using Telemetry Technology and VMS. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(9):e0160564. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0160564
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Seals and humans often target the same food resource, leading to competition. This is of mounting concern with fish stocks in global decline. Grey seals were tracked from southeast Ireland, an area of mixed demersal and pelagic fisheries, and overlap with fisheries on the Celtic Shelf and Irish Sea was assessed. Overall, there was low overlap between the tagged seals and fisheries. However, when we separate active (e.g. trawls) and passive gear (e.g. nets, lines) fisheries, a different picture emerged. Overlap with active fisheries was no different from that expected under a random distribution, but overlap with passive fisheries was significantly higher. This suggests that grey seals may be targeting the same areas as passive fisheries and/or specifically targeting passive gear. There was variation in foraging areas between individual seals suggesting habitat partitioning to reduce intra-specific competition or potential individual specialisation in foraging behaviour. Our findings support other recent assertions that seal/fisheries interactions in Irish waters are an issue in inshore passive fisheries, most likely at the operational and individual level. This suggests that seal population management measures would be unjustifiable, and mitigation is best focused on minimizing interactions at nets.

Shark Conservation: An Educational Approach Based on Children’s Knowledge and Perceptions toward Sharks

Tsoi KHo, Chan SYing, Lee YChung, Ip BHo Yeung, Cheang CChiu. Shark Conservation: An Educational Approach Based on Children’s Knowledge and Perceptions toward Sharks. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(9):e0163406. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0163406
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Shark conservation has become a focus of current international conservation efforts. However, the misunderstanding of sharks and their negative public portrayal may hinder their conservation. More importantly, the consumption of shark fin, which is very common in Chinese cultures, poses a significant threat to sharks. Hong Kong has long been the world’s largest shark fin trading center. Shark conservation would become more sustainable if public understanding of this predatory fish and an appreciation of its ecological significance could be promoted. It is possible that the demand for fins could be effectively managed through long-term educational efforts targeted at younger generations. To provide essential baseline data for planning of these educational efforts, this project investigated the perceptions of 11 to 12 year-old primary school students in Hong Kong about sharks, and their understanding of ecological concepts and shark-related knowledge. The findings indicate that these students lack sufficient knowledge and possess misconceptions about sharks and their ecological significance in the marine ecosystem. The students’ conceptual understanding level is strongly correlated with their perceptions. Correlational analyses further demonstrated a positive association between formal education and perceptions toward shark conservation. The students who favoured shark fin consumption did so because of its tastiness, whereas concerns about shark population decline and the cruelty of shark hunting were the main reasons for not favoring shark fin consumption. This pilot study provides preliminary but important insights into primary school education regarding the conservation of sharks.

Spatial Distribution of Reef Fish Species along the Southeast US Atlantic Coast Inferred from Underwater Video Survey Data

Bacheler NM, Schobernd ZH, Berrane DJ, Schobernd CM, Mitchell WA, Teer BZ, Gregalis KC, Glasgow DM. Spatial Distribution of Reef Fish Species along the Southeast US Atlantic Coast Inferred from Underwater Video Survey Data. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(9):e0162653. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0162653
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine fish abundance and distribution often varies across spatial scales for a variety of reasons, and this variability has significant ecological and management consequences. We quantified the distribution of reef-associated fish species along the southeast United States Atlantic coast using underwater video survey samples (N = 4,855 in 2011–2014) to elucidate variability within species across space, depths, and habitats, as well as describe broad-scale patterns in species richness. Thirty-two species were seen at least 10 times on video, and the most commonly observed species were red porgy (Pagrus pagrus; 41.4% of videos), gray triggerfish (Balistes capriscus; 31.0%), black sea bass (Centropristis striata; 29.1%), vermilion snapper (Rhomboplites aurorubens; 27.7%), and red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus; 22.6%). Using generalized additive models, we found that most species were non-randomly distributed across space, depths, and habitats. Most rare species were observed along the continental shelf break, except for goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara), which was found on the continental shelf in Florida and Georgia. We also observed higher numbers of species in shelf-break habitats from southern North Carolina to Georgia, and fewer in shallower water and at the northern and southern ends of the southeast United States Atlantic coast. Our study provides the first broad-scale description of the spatial distribution of reef fish in the region to be based on fishery-independent data, reinforces the utility of underwater video to survey reef fish, and can help improve the management of reef fish in the SEUS, for example, by improving indices of abundance.

Occurrence and removal of organic micropollutants: An overview of the watch list of EU Decision 2015/495

Barbosa MO, Moreira NFF, Ribeiro AR, Pereira MFR, Silva AMT. Occurrence and removal of organic micropollutants: An overview of the watch list of EU Decision 2015/495. Water Research [Internet]. 2016 ;94:257 - 279. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0043135416301063
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Journal Article

Although there are no legal discharge limits for micropollutants into the environment, some regulations have been published in the last few years. Recently, a watch list of substances for European Union-wide monitoring was reported in the Decision 2015/495/EU of 20 March 2015. Besides the substances previously recommended to be included by the Directive 39/2013/EU, namely two pharmaceuticals (diclofenac and the synthetic hormone 17-alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2)) and a natural hormone (17-beta-estradiol (E2)), the first watch list of 10 substances/groups of substances also refers three macrolide antibiotics (azithromycin, clarithromycin and erythromycin), other natural hormone (estrone (E1)), some pesticides (methiocarb, oxadiazon, imidacloprid, thiacloprid, thiamethoxam, clothianidin, acetamiprid and triallate), a UV filter (2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate) and an antioxidant (2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol) commonly used as food additive. Since little is known about the removal of most of the substances included in the Decision 2015/495/EU, particularly regarding realistic concentrations in aqueous environmental samples, this review aims to: (i) overview the European policy in the water field; (ii) briefly describe the most commonly used conventional and advanced treatment processes to remove micropollutants; (iii) summarize the relevant data published in the last decade, regarding occurrence and removal in aqueous matrices of the 10 substances/groups of substances that were recently included in the first watch list for European Union monitoring (Decision 2015/495/EU); and (iv) highlight the lack of reports concerning some substances of the watch list, the study of un-spiked aquatic matrices and the assessment of transformation by-products.

Fisheries as a source of marine debris on beaches in the United Kingdom

Unger A, Harrison N. Fisheries as a source of marine debris on beaches in the United Kingdom. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2016 ;107(1):52 - 58. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X16302077
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Journal Article

Marine debris from ships has persisted and remains a concern despite international agreements such as MARPOL. We report on an analysis of beach litter based on a data set established by the Marine Conservation Society (MSC) Beachwatch weekends. Debris collected around the UK was divided into three main types of debris: (1) plastic, (2) fishing, and (3) fishing related plastic and rubber. Correspondence analysis (CA) was used to examine patterns in the occurrence of debris types on a total of 1023 beaches and debris attributable to fishing was identified on clusters of beaches mainly located on the coasts of Scotland and along the English Channel. General Linear model (GLM) identified fishing as the highest explanatory factor when testing for relationships between litter and proximity to fishing ports and grounds. The results add to the growing body of evidence that the fishing industry is largely responsible for marine debris.

Are Wave and Tidal Energy Plants New Green Technologies?

Douziech M, Hellweg S, Verones F. Are Wave and Tidal Energy Plants New Green Technologies?. Environmental Science & Technology [Internet]. 2016 ;50(14):7870 - 7878. Available from: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.est.6b00156
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Journal Article

Wave and tidal energy plants are upcoming, potentially green technologies. This study aims at quantifying their various potential environmental impacts. Three tidal stream devices, one tidal range plant and one wave energy harnessing device are analyzed over their entire life cycles, using the ReCiPe 2008 methodology at midpoint level. The impacts of the tidal range plant were on average 1.6 times higher than the ones of hydro-power plants (without considering natural land transformation). A similar ratio was found when comparing the results of the three tidal stream devices to offshore wind power plants (without considering water depletion). The wave energy harnessing device had on average 3.5 times higher impacts than offshore wind power. On the contrary, the considered plants have on average 8 (wave energy) to 20 (tidal stream), or even 115 times (tidal range) lower impact than electricity generated from coal power. Further, testing the sensitivity of the results highlighted the advantage of long lifetimes and small material requirements. Overall, this study supports the potential of wave and tidal energy plants as alternative green technologies. However, potential unknown effects, such as the impact of turbulence or noise on marine ecosystems, should be further explored in future research.

Making progress on bycatch avoidance in the ocean salmon fishery using a transdisciplinary approach

Otto SA, Simons S, Stoll JS, Lawson P. Making progress on bycatch avoidance in the ocean salmon fishery using a transdisciplinary approach. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2016 ;73(9):2380 - 2394. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/content/73/9/2380.abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Transdisciplinary research that crosses disciplinary boundaries and includes stakeholder collaboration is increasingly being used to address pressing and complex socio-ecological challenges in the Anthropocene. In fisheries, we see transdisciplinary approaches being employed to address a range of challenges, including bycatch where fine-scale data are collected by fishers to help advance spatial approaches in which fishing effort is shifted away from bycatch hotspots. However, the spatio-temporal overlap of morphologically undistinguishable fish stocks, some of which are depleted, is a major concern for some fisheries, including the Pacific Northwest troll Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) fishery. In this study, we develop and evaluate a transdisciplinary approach to avoid bycatch in the commercial Chinook salmon troll fishery off northern and central Oregon. Based on a unique genetic dataset collected by fishers, fine-scale patterns of stock distribution and spatial stock overlap were assessed. Two hotspots of weak Klamath stock in the study region were identified and related to bathymetry. Results were then fed into a simple bioeconomic model to evaluate costs and benefits of reallocating effort under two scenarios of allowable catch of a weak stock (Klamath). The scenarios demonstrate that effort reallocation could lead to a reduction in Klamath catch as well as to increases in net profit, but outcomes depend on the distance from the fleets' home port to the new fishing area. The output of the model at its current stage should be regarded strategically, providing a qualitative understanding of the types of best fleet strategies. Despite some challenges in transdisciplinarity discussed in this study and the present limitations to incorporate fine-scale changes of Chinook salmon stock distributions in management regulations, we contend that this approach to research has the potential to lead to improved management outcomes.

Microbial community and its potential as descriptor of environmental status

Caruso G, Azzaro M, Caroppo C, Decembrini F, Monticelli LSalvador, Leonardi M, Maimone G, Zaccone R, La Ferla R. Microbial community and its potential as descriptor of environmental status. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2016 ;73(9):2174 - 2177. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/content/73/9/2174.abstract
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Planktonic communities hold a relevant role within the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). In view of reaching the Good Environmental Status of marine ecosystems, within this Directive the phyto- and zooplanktonic communities have received great attention, while Prokaryotes (Bacteria, Archaea, and Cyanobacteria) have been neglected. Indeed, the relevance of microbes (particularly of the faecal pollution indicators) as water quality indicators, the role that microorganisms play within the biogeochemical fluxes and in the whole ecosystem functioning, are all important features that deserve to be focused within the MSFD. The present study aims at reviewing the main issues where prokaryotic variables find useful application as descriptors of environmental status, trying to develop a panel of prokaryotic indicators suitable for the environmental quality assessment. From a survey of scientific literature and on field datasets, prokaryotic abundance and activities (enzymatic hydrolysis, prokaryotic production, and respiratory rates) are here chosen as early warning sentinels to detect changes in environmental quality, using an integrated approach with trophic (chlorophyll-a, particulate and dissolved organic matter) measurements.

Of mice, fishermen, and food

Hilborn R. Of mice, fishermen, and food. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2016 ;73(9):2167 - 2173. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/content/73/9/2167.abstract
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A non-linear science career: how I started in terrestrial ecology working on rodents, moved on to fisheries management, and ended up comparing the environmental impacts of fishing to farming. I was drawn to fisheries because there was a real need for science and the kind of analysis I did to help solve real world problems. I was very fortunate that the advent of major computing power and the demand for fisheries management driven by the declaration of 200 mile exclusive economic zones coincided with my completing the PhD. A career formed by good fortune, meeting and working with excellent colleagues, and random events at just the right time. My advice to young scientists in the field is to build collaborations, both with other scientists but also with the managers of the fisheries. Get your hands dirty in real problems, but always remembering the importance of fisheries to the food security of some of the poorest people of the world. What you do really matters.

Challenging ICES age estimation protocols: lessons learned from the eastern Baltic cod stock

Hüssy K, Radtke K, Plikshs M, Oeberst R, Baranova T, Krumme U, Sjöberg R, Walther Y, Mosegaard H. Challenging ICES age estimation protocols: lessons learned from the eastern Baltic cod stock. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2016 ;73(9):2138 - 2149. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/content/73/9/2138.abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Over the recent decades, the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) has set guidelines for best practise quality control of age estimation procedures. The applicability of these guidelines is assessed by reviewing the ageing issues of eastern Baltic cod (EBC) as a case study. Since the implementation of an age-based assessment of EBC in the beginning of the 1970s, the assessment has been hampered by the quality of the age composition data, in recent years to a degree that age-based assessment is no longer used. The reason for the age reading problems is the low visual contrast between growth zones in the otoliths which seems to be the result of complex interactions of the hydrography in the Baltic Sea with the cod’s biology and behaviour. Over the last 40 years, various expert groups have struggled to document and improve the agreement of age estimation between national otolith readers, standardize methods and age estimations through repeated exchanges and reference collections as well as an internationally agreed manual. Despite these initiatives the precision of the age estimations based on traditional ageing did not improve, with significant bias persisting between and within readers. Additionally, a wide range of alternative methods for deriving the age information necessary for stock assessment and for validation of the true age have been tested. However, these methods did not produce unbiased age estimates over the entire size and age range of the EBC stock. An age-validation is urgently needed. Deviations from the ICES guidelines identified are as follows: (i) the lack of rigorous quality control, particularly the auditing of national trends in age precision over the years using a reference collection and (ii) the implementation of an age error matrix in the stock assessment.

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