2016-11-23

Large-scale coral reef restoration could assist natural recovery in Seychelles, Indian Ocean

Maya PHernando M, Smit KPamela, Burt AJasmine, Frias-Torres S. Large-scale coral reef restoration could assist natural recovery in Seychelles, Indian Ocean. Nature Conservation [Internet]. 2016 ;16:1 - 17. Available from: http://natureconservation.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=8604
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The aim of ecological restoration is to establish self-sustaining and resilient systems. In coral reef restoration, transplantation of nursery-grown corals is seen as a potential method to mitigate reef degradation and enhance recovery. The transplanted reef should be capable of recruiting new juvenile corals to ensure long-term resilience. Here, we quantified how coral transplantation influenced natural coral recruitment at a large-scale coral reef restoration site in Seychelles, Indian Ocean. Between November 2011 and June 2014 a total of 24,431 nursery-grown coral colonies from 10 different coral species were transplanted in 5,225 m2(0.52 ha) of degraded reef at the no-take marine reserve of Cousin Island Special Reserve in an attempt to assist in natural reef recovery. We present the results of research and monitoring conducted before and after coral transplantation to evaluate the positive effect that the project had on coral recruitment and reef recovery at the restored site. We quantified the density of coral recruits (spat <1 cm) and juveniles (colonies 1-5 cm) at the transplanted site, a degraded control site and a healthy control site at the marine reserve. We used ceramic tiles to estimate coral settlement and visual surveys with 1 m2 quadrats to estimate coral recruitment. Six months after tile deployment, total spat density at the transplanted site (123.4 ± 13.3 spat m-2) was 1.8 times higher than at healthy site (68.4 ± 7.8 spat m-2) and 1.6 times higher than at degraded site (78.2 ± 7.17 spat m-2). Two years after first transplantation, the total recruit density was highest at healthy site (4.8 ± 0.4 recruits m-2), intermediate at transplanted site (2.7 ± 0.4 recruits m-2), and lowest at degraded site (1.7 ± 0.3 recruits m-2). The results suggest that large-scale coral restoration may have a positive influence on coral recruitment and juveniles. The effect of key project techniques on the results are discussed. This study supports the application of large-scale, science-based coral reef restoration projects with at least a 3-year time scale to assist the recovery of damaged reefs.

"Advocacy" and "Activism" Are Not Dirty Words–How Activists Can Better Help Conservation Scientists

Parsons ECM. "Advocacy" and "Activism" Are Not Dirty Words–How Activists Can Better Help Conservation Scientists. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2016 ;3. Available from: http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmars.2016.00229/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Whether scientists should be advocates for conservation has been a matter of debate in the scientific community and literature (Brussard and Tull, 2007Lackey, 2007Noss, 2007Chan, 2008Nelson and Vucetich, 2009Scott and Rachlow, 2010Parsons, 2013Rose and Parsons, 2015). Some are set against it, such as Lackey (2007), who considers that while scientists should be involved in the policy process, they should not show any preferences for conservation policies, nor even use value-laden terms in their work, such as good, healthy, or degradation. On the other side of the spectrum, Noss (2007) argues that everyone has opinions and values and, when it comes to making policy recommendations, who better to do so than scientists, who are closest to the facts?

Changes in fish assemblage structure after implementation of Marine Protected Areas in the south western coast of Portugal

Pereira TJosé, Manique J, Quintella BRuivo, Castro N, de Almeida PRaposo, Costa JLino. Changes in fish assemblage structure after implementation of Marine Protected Areas in the south western coast of Portugal. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;135:103 - 112. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569116303179
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are increasingly being recommended as management tools for biodiversity conservation and fisheries. With the purpose of protecting the region's biodiversity and prevent the over exploitation of marine resources, in February 2011 the no-take MPAs of Ilha do Pessegueiro and Cabo Sardão were implemented within the “Parque Natural do Sudoeste Alentejano e Costa Vicentina “(PNSACV) Marine Park, south western coast of Portugal. As such, commercial and recreational fishing became prohibited in these areas. In order to evaluate the effects of these no-take MPAs, the structure of their fish assemblages and of adjacent control areas without fishing restrictions were studied between 2011 (immediately after implementation) and 2013 (two years after implementation). A total of 4 sampling campaigns were conducted (summer 2011, winter 2012, summer 2013 and winter 2013) using trammel nets and bottom trawl. Ichthyofaunal assemblages from the no-take MPAs (treatment) were compared with adjacent areas (controls) and changes evaluated as a function of time since protection. Results revealed significant increase in fish abundance after the implementation of the no-take MPAs. Furthermore, significant differences in the structure of fish assemblages (abundance and fish size) between protected and neighbouring areas were rapidly observed upon the implementation of the no-take MPAs. In addition, specimens of larger size occurred more frequently within Ilha do Pessegueiro no-take MPA in the last year of the study. Overall, despite the young age of these no-take MPAs, changes on the structure of their fish assemblages were already evident after only two years of protection, indicating that management measures such as MPA designation may play an important role to promote fisheries sustainable exploitation as well as to protect species with conservation interest.

Siting marine protected areas based on habitat quality and extent provides the greatest benefit to spatially structured metapopulations

Cabral RB, Gaines SD, Lim MT, Atrigenio MP, Mamauag SS, Pedemonte GC, Aliño PM. Siting marine protected areas based on habitat quality and extent provides the greatest benefit to spatially structured metapopulations. Ecosphere [Internet]. 2016 ;7(11):e01533. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ecs2.1533/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Connectivity and its role in the persistence and sustainability of marine metapopulations are attracting increased attention from the scientific community and coastal resource managers. Whether protection should prioritize the connectivity structure or demographic characteristics of a given patch is still unclear. We design a three-stage population model to analyze the relative importance of sources, sinks, quality and extent of juvenile and adult habitat, and node centralities (eigenvector, degree, closeness, and betweenness) as a basis for prioritizing sites. We use a logistic-type stage-structured model to describe the local dynamics of a population with a sessile adult stage and network models to elucidate propagule-exchange dynamics. Our results show that the coupled states of habitat extent and quality, which determine population carrying capacity, are good criteria for protection strategy. Protecting sites on the basis of sources, sinks, or other centrality measures of connectivity becomes optimal only in limited situations, that is, when larval production is not dependent on the adult population. Our findings are robust to a diverse set of larval pathway structures and levels of larval retention, which indicates that the network topology may not be as important as carrying capacity in determining the fate of the metapopulation. Protecting extensive, good quality habitat can help achieve both conservation and fisheries objectives.

Sensitivity of marine protected area network connectivity to atmospheric variability

Fox AD, Henry L-A, Corne DW, J. Roberts M. Sensitivity of marine protected area network connectivity to atmospheric variability. Royal Society Open Science [Internet]. 2016 ;3(11):160494. Available from: http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/3/11/160494
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

International efforts are underway to establish well-connected systems of marine protected areas (MPAs) covering at least 10% of the ocean by 2020. But the nature and dynamics of ocean ecosystem connectivity are poorly understood, with unresolved effects of climate variability. We used 40-year runs of a particle tracking model to examine the sensitivity of an MPA network for habitat-forming cold-water corals in the northeast Atlantic to changes in larval dispersal driven by atmospheric cycles and larval behaviour. Trajectories of Lophelia pertusa larvae were strongly correlated to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the dominant pattern of interannual atmospheric circulation variability over the northeast Atlantic. Variability in trajectories significantly altered network connectivity and source–sink dynamics, with positive phase NAO conditions producing a well-connected but asymmetrical network connected from west to east. Negative phase NAO produced reduced connectivity, but notably some larvae tracked westward-flowing currents towards coral populations on the mid-Atlantic ridge. Graph theoretical metrics demonstrate critical roles played by seamounts and offshore banks in larval supply and maintaining connectivity across the network. Larval longevity and behaviour mediated dispersal and connectivity, with shorter lived and passive larvae associated with reduced connectivity. We conclude that the existing MPA network is vulnerable to atmospheric-driven changes in ocean circulation.

Interaction between Penaeid Shrimp and Fish Populations in the Gulf of Mexico: Importance of Shrimp as Forage Species

Fujiwara M, Zhou C, Acres C, Martinez-Andrade F. Interaction between Penaeid Shrimp and Fish Populations in the Gulf of Mexico: Importance of Shrimp as Forage Species. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(11):e0166479. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0166479
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

This study investigated the contribution of shrimp stocks in supporting the production of valuable predator species. Fishery-independent data on white shrimp, brown shrimp, and selected fish species (spotted seatrout, red drum, and southern flounder) were collected from 1986 to 2014 by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, and converted to catch-per-unit effort (CPUE). Here, the associations between the CPUEs of fish species as predators and those of shrimp species as prey in each sampled bay and sampling season were analyzed using co-integration analysis and Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR). Co-integration analysis revealed significant associations between 31 of 70 possible fish/shrimp pairings. The analysis also revealed discernible seasonal and spatial patterns. White shrimp in August and brown shrimp in May were associated with fish CPUEs in bays located along the lower coast of Texas, whereas white shrimp in November was more strongly associated with fish CPUEs in bays located on the upper coast. This suggests the possible influence of latitudinal environmental gradient. The results of the PLSR, on the other hand, were not conclusive. This may reflect the high statistical error rates inherent to the analysis of short non-stationary time series. Co-integration is a robust method when analyzing non-stationary time series, and a majority of time series in this study was non-stationary. Based on our co-integration results, we conclude that the CPUE data show significant associations between shrimp abundance and the three predator fish species in the tested regions.

Sympathy for the Devil: Detailing the Effects of Planning-Unit Size, Thematic Resolution of Reef Classes, and Socioeconomic Costs on Spatial Priorities for Marine Conservation

Cheok J, Pressey RL, Weeks R, Andréfouët S, Moloney J. Sympathy for the Devil: Detailing the Effects of Planning-Unit Size, Thematic Resolution of Reef Classes, and Socioeconomic Costs on Spatial Priorities for Marine Conservation. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(11):e0164869. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0164869
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Spatial data characteristics have the potential to influence various aspects of prioritising biodiversity areas for systematic conservation planning. There has been some exploration of the combined effects of size of planning units and level of classification of physical environments on the pattern and extent of priority areas. However, these data characteristics have yet to be explicitly investigated in terms of their interaction with different socioeconomic cost data during the spatial prioritisation process. We quantify the individual and interacting effects of three factors—planning-unit size, thematic resolution of reef classes, and spatial variability of socioeconomic costs—on spatial priorities for marine conservation, in typical marine planning exercises that use reef classification maps as a proxy for biodiversity. We assess these factors by creating 20 unique prioritisation scenarios involving combinations of different levels of each factor. Because output data from these scenarios are analogous to ecological data, we applied ecological statistics to determine spatial similarities between reserve designs. All three factors influenced prioritisations to different extents, with cost variability having the largest influence, followed by planning-unit size and thematic resolution of reef classes. The effect of thematic resolution on spatial design depended on the variability of cost data used. In terms of incidental representation of conservation objectives derived from finer-resolution data, scenarios prioritised with uniform cost outperformed those prioritised with variable cost. Following our analyses, we make recommendations to help maximise the spatial and cost efficiency and potential effectiveness of future marine conservation plans in similar planning scenarios. We recommend that planners: employ the smallest planning-unit size practical; invest in data at the highest possible resolution; and, when planning across regional extents with the intention of incidentally representing fine-resolution features, prioritise the whole region with uniform costs rather than using coarse-resolution data on variable costs.

Twitter Predicts Citation Rates of Ecological Research

Peoples BK, Midway SR, Sackett D, Lynch A, Cooney PB. Twitter Predicts Citation Rates of Ecological Research. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(11):e0166570. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0166570
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The relationship between traditional metrics of research impact (e.g., number of citations) and alternative metrics (altmetrics) such as Twitter activity are of great interest, but remain imprecisely quantified. We used generalized linear mixed modeling to estimate the relative effects of Twitter activity, journal impact factor, and time since publication on Web of Science citation rates of 1,599 primary research articles from 20 ecology journals published from 2012–2014. We found a strong positive relationship between Twitter activity (i.e., the number of unique tweets about an article) and number of citations. Twitter activity was a more important predictor of citation rates than 5-year journal impact factor. Moreover, Twitter activity was not driven by journal impact factor; the ‘highest-impact’ journals were not necessarily the most discussed online. The effect of Twitter activity was only about a fifth as strong as time since publication; accounting for this confounding factor was critical for estimating the true effects of Twitter use. Articles in impactful journals can become heavily cited, but articles in journals with lower impact factors can generate considerable Twitter activity and also become heavily cited. Authors may benefit from establishing a strong social media presence, but should not expect research to become highly cited solely through social media promotion. Our research demonstrates that altmetrics and traditional metrics can be closely related, but not identical. We suggest that both altmetrics and traditional citation rates can be useful metrics of research impact.

Global patterns of kelp forest change over the past half-century

Krumhansl KA, Okamoto DK, Rassweiler A, Novak M, Bolton JJ, Cavanaugh KC, Connell SD, Johnson CR, Konar B, Ling SD, et al. Global patterns of kelp forest change over the past half-century. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2016 :201606102. Available from: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/11/09/1606102113.abstract.html
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Kelp forests (Order Laminariales) form key biogenic habitats in coastal regions of temperate and Arctic seas worldwide, providing ecosystem services valued in the range of billions of dollars annually. Although local evidence suggests that kelp forests are increasingly threatened by a variety of stressors, no comprehensive global analysis of change in kelp abundances currently exists. Here, we build and analyze a global database of kelp time series spanning the past half-century to assess regional and global trends in kelp abundances. We detected a high degree of geographic variation in trends, with regional variability in the direction and magnitude of change far exceeding a small global average decline (instantaneous rate of change = −0.018 y−1). Our analysis identified declines in 38% of ecoregions for which there are data (−0.015 to −0.18 y−1), increases in 27% of ecoregions (0.015 to 0.11 y−1), and no detectable change in 35% of ecoregions. These spatially variable trajectories reflected regional differences in the drivers of change, uncertainty in some regions owing to poor spatial and temporal data coverage, and the dynamic nature of kelp populations. We conclude that although global drivers could be affecting kelp forests at multiple scales, local stressors and regional variation in the effects of these drivers dominate kelp dynamics, in contrast to many other marine and terrestrial foundation species.

Long-term empirical evidence of ocean warming leading to tropicalization of fish communities, increased herbivory, and loss of kelp

Vergés A, Doropoulos C, Malcolm HA, Skye M, Garcia-Pizá M, Marzinelli EM, Campbell AH, Ballesteros E, Hoey AS, Vila-Concejo A, et al. Long-term empirical evidence of ocean warming leading to tropicalization of fish communities, increased herbivory, and loss of kelp. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2016 :201610725. Available from: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/11/08/1610725113.abstract.html
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Some of the most profound effects of climate change on ecological communities are due to alterations in species interactions rather than direct physiological effects of changing environmental conditions. Empirical evidence of historical changes in species interactions within climate-impacted communities is, however, rare and difficult to obtain. Here, we demonstrate the recent disappearance of key habitat-forming kelp forests from a warming tropical–temperate transition zone in eastern Australia. Using a 10-y video dataset encompassing a 0.6 °C warming period, we show how herbivory increased as kelp gradually declined and then disappeared. Concurrently, fish communities from sites where kelp was originally abundant but subsequently disappeared became increasingly dominated by tropical herbivores. Feeding assays identified two key tropical/subtropical herbivores that consumed transplanted kelp within hours at these sites. There was also a distinct increase in the abundance of fishes that consume epilithic algae, and much higher bite rates by this group at sites without kelp, suggesting a key role for these fishes in maintaining reefs in kelp-free states by removing kelp recruits. Changes in kelp abundance showed no direct relationship to seawater temperatures over the decade and were also unrelated to other measured abiotic factors (nutrients and storms). Our results show that warming-mediated increases in fish herbivory pose a significant threat to kelp-dominated ecosystems in Australia and, potentially, globally.

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