2017-01-11

Comparing Selections of Environmental Variables for Ecological Studies: A Focus on Terrain Attributes

Lecours V, Brown CJ, Devillers R, Lucieer VL, Edinger EN. Comparing Selections of Environmental Variables for Ecological Studies: A Focus on Terrain Attributes. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(12):e0167128. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0167128
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Selecting appropriate environmental variables is a key step in ecology. Terrain attributes (e.g. slope, rugosity) are routinely used as abiotic surrogates of species distribution and to produce habitat maps that can be used in decision-making for conservation or management. Selecting appropriate terrain attributes for ecological studies may be a challenging process that can lead users to select a subjective, potentially sub-optimal combination of attributes for their applications. The objective of this paper is to assess the impacts of subjectively selecting terrain attributes for ecological applications by comparing the performance of different combinations of terrain attributes in the production of habitat maps and species distribution models. Seven different selections of terrain attributes, alone or in combination with other environmental variables, were used to map benthic habitats of German Bank (off Nova Scotia, Canada). 29 maps of potential habitats based on unsupervised classifications of biophysical characteristics of German Bank were produced, and 29 species distribution models of sea scallops were generated using MaxEnt. The performances of the 58 maps were quantified and compared to evaluate the effectiveness of the various combinations of environmental variables. One of the combinations of terrain attributes–recommended in a related study and that includes a measure of relative position, slope, two measures of orientation, topographic mean and a measure of rugosity–yielded better results than the other selections for both methodologies, confirming that they together best describe terrain properties. Important differences in performance (up to 47% in accuracy measurement) and spatial outputs (up to 58% in spatial distribution of habitats) highlighted the importance of carefully selecting variables for ecological applications. This paper demonstrates that making a subjective choice of variables may reduce map accuracy and produce maps that do not adequately represent habitats and species distributions, thus having important implications when these maps are used for decision-making.

Targeting Abundant Fish Stocks while Avoiding Overfished Species: Video and Fishing Surveys to Inform Management after Long-Term Fishery Closures

Starr RM, Gleason MG, Marks CI, Kline D, Rienecke S, Denney C, Tagini A, Field JC. Targeting Abundant Fish Stocks while Avoiding Overfished Species: Video and Fishing Surveys to Inform Management after Long-Term Fishery Closures. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(12):e0168645. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0168645
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Historically, it has been difficult to balance conservation goals and yield objectives when managing multispecies fisheries that include stocks with various vulnerabilities to fishing. As managers try to maximize yield in mixed-stock fisheries, exploitation rates can lead to less productive stocks becoming overfished. In the late 1990s, population declines of several U.S. West Coast groundfish species caused the U.S. Pacific Fishery Management Council to create coast-wide fishery closures, known as Rockfish Conservation Areas, to rebuild overfished species. The fishery closures and other management measures successfully reduced fishing mortality of these species, but constrained fishing opportunities on abundant stocks. Restrictive regulations also caused the unintended consequence of reducing fishery-dependent data available to assess population status of fished species. As stocks rebuild, managers are faced with the challenge of increasing fishing opportunities while minimizing fishing mortality on rebuilding species. We designed a camera system to evaluate fishes in coastal habitats and used experimental gear and fishing techniques paired with video surveys to determine if abundant species could be caught in rocky habitats with minimal catches of co-occurring rebuilding species. We fished a total of 58 days and completed 741 sets with vertical hook-and-line fishing gear. We also conducted 299 video surveys in the same locations where fishing occurred. Comparison of fishing and stereo-video surveys indicated that fishermen could fish with modified hook-and-line gear to catch abundant species while limiting bycatch of rebuilding species. As populations of overfished species continue to recover along the U.S. West Coast, it is important to improve data collection, and video and fishing surveys may be key to assessing species that occur in rocky habitats.

Goldilocks and the Raster Grid: Selecting Scale when Evaluating Conservation Programs

Avelino AFernandes, Baylis K, Honey-Rosés J. Goldilocks and the Raster Grid: Selecting Scale when Evaluating Conservation Programs. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2016 ;11(12):e0167945. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0167945
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Access to high quality spatial data raises fundamental questions about how to select the appropriate scale and unit of analysis. Studies that evaluate the impact of conservation programs have used multiple scales and areal units: from 5x5 km grids; to 30m pixels; to irregular units based on land uses or political boundaries. These choices affect the estimate of program impact. The bias associated with scale and unit selection is a part of a well-known dilemma called the modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP). We introduce this dilemma to the literature on impact evaluation and then explore the tradeoffs made when choosing different areal units. To illustrate the consequences of the MAUP, we begin by examining the effect of scale selection when evaluating a protected area in Mexico using real data. We then develop a Monte Carlo experiment that simulates a conservation intervention. We find that estimates of treatment effects and variable coefficients are only accurate under restrictive circumstances. Under more realistic conditions, we find biased estimates associated with scale choices that are both too large or too small relative to the data generating process or decision unit. In our context, the MAUP may reflect an errors in variables problem, where imprecise measures of the independent variables will bias the coefficient estimates toward zero. This problem may be pronounced at small scales of analysis. Aggregation may reduce this bias for continuous variables, but aggregation exacerbates bias when using a discrete measure of treatment. While we do not find a solution to these issues, even though treatment effects are generally underestimated. We conclude with suggestions on how researchers might navigate their choice of scale and aerial unit when evaluating conservation policies.

Temporal patterns in the soundscape of the shallow waters of a Mediterranean marine protected area

Buscaino G, Ceraulo M, Pieretti N, Corrias V, Farina A, Filiciotto F, Maccarrone V, Grammauta R, Caruso F, Giuseppe A, et al. Temporal patterns in the soundscape of the shallow waters of a Mediterranean marine protected area. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2016 ;6:34230. Available from: http://www.nature.com/articles/srep34230
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The study of marine soundscapes is an emerging field of research that contributes important information about biological compositions and environmental conditions. The seasonal and circadian soundscape trends of a marine protected area (MPA) in the Mediterranean Sea have been studied for one year using an autonomous acoustic recorder. Frequencies less than 1 kHz are dominated by noise generated by waves and are louder during the winter; conversely, higher frequencies (4–96 kHz) are dominated by snapping shrimp, which increase their acoustic activity at night during the summer. Fish choruses, below 2 kHz, characterize the soundscape at sunset during the summer. Because there are 13 vessel passages per hour on average, causing acoustic interference with fish choruses 46% of the time, this MPA cannot be considered to be protected from noise. On the basis of the high seasonal variability of the soundscape components, this study proposes a one-year acoustic monitoring protocol using the soundscape methodology approach and discusses the concept of MPA size.

Future Trends in the Celtic Seas: Summary Report

Anon. Future Trends in the Celtic Seas: Summary Report. Celtic Seas Partnership; 2016. Available from: http://futuretrends.celticseaspartnership.eu
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

International to carry out a ground-breaking study exploring future growth scenarios in the Celtic Seas and the resulting economic, social and environmental impacts. Stakeholder engagement has been a key element of the project to inform and shape the scenarios and in seeking to discuss a shared future vision for the Celtic Seas.

This Summary Report is one of a series of outputs of the study. The full series of reports is as follows:

  • Summary Report
  • Methodology Report
  • Baseline Report
  • Scenarios Report
  • Analysis Report 

Fish behaviour effects on the accuracy and precision of underwater visual census surveys. A virtual ecologist approach using an individual-based model

Pais MPessanha, Cabral HN. Fish behaviour effects on the accuracy and precision of underwater visual census surveys. A virtual ecologist approach using an individual-based model. Ecological Modelling [Internet]. 2017 ;346:58 - 69. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304380016308055
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Underwater visual census (UVC) methods are used worldwide to monitor shallow marine and freshwater habitats and support management and conservation decisions. However, several sources of bias still undermine the ability of these methods to accurately estimate abundances of some species.

The present study introduces FishCensus, a spatially-explicit individual-based model that simulates underwater visual census of fish populations. The model features small temporal and spatial scales and uses a movement algorithm which can be shaped to reflect complex behaviours and effects of diver presence. Four different types of fish were used in the model, featuring typically problematic behavioural traits, namely schooling behaviour, cryptic habits, shyness and boldness. Corresponding control types were also modelled, lacking only the key behavioural traits. Sampling was conducted by a virtual diver using four true fish densities and employing two distinct methods: strip transects and stationary point counts.

Comparisons with control fish have shown that schooling and bold behaviours induce positive bias and reduce precision, while cryptic and shy behaviours induce negative bias and increase precision, although shy behaviour did not have a significant effect on precision in transects. By looking at deviations from true density, however, schooling, shy and bold fish densities were strongly overestimated by both methods, while cryptic fish were slightly underestimated. Schooling and bold fish had the lowest precision overall, followed by shy fish. Fish rarity decreased precision, but had no effect on bias. Stationary points had less precision than transects for all fish types, and led to much higher counts, resulting in greater overestimation of density overall.

By modelling complex behaviour, it was possible to separate the contributions of detectability and non-instantaneous sampling on bias, and gain a deeper understanding of the effect of behavioural traits on UVC estimates. The model can be used as a tool for planning and optimization of monitoring programs or to calculate conversion factors for past or ongoing surveys, assuming behavioural patterns are well replicated.

A comparative analysis of holistic marine management regimes and ecosystem approach in marine spatial planning in developed countries

Rodriguez NJI. A comparative analysis of holistic marine management regimes and ecosystem approach in marine spatial planning in developed countries. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;137:185 - 197. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569116304677
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Internationally marine ecosystem-based management has been embraced as an approach to design holistic marine management regimes. In this article a comparative research strategy is applied in the analysis of the holistic marine management regimes in Norway, Australia, US, Canada and the European Union. How can holistic marine management regimes based on an ecosystem approach contribute to sustainable ocean development? Important in this context is how the origin and theory of an ecosystem-based management is implemented and interpreted, and to what extent this is manifested through policies, strategies and legal frameworks. The results of this research indicate that the implementation of marine-ecosystem based management is heterogeneous. This article discusses the concrete mechanisms that are used to reach the aim of sustainable ocean management. Implementation challenges are related to lack of functional metrics, weak spatial measures, weak integration and lack of adaptive management. Still marine ecosystem-based management is an important step forward for sustainable ocean governance.

Challenges for the future of ports. What can be learnt from the Spanish Mediterranean ports?

Nebot N, Rosa-Jiménez C, Ninot RPié, Perea-Medina B. Challenges for the future of ports. What can be learnt from the Spanish Mediterranean ports?. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;137:165 - 174. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569116304379
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The tourist development along the Mediterranean coast, especially on the coast of Spain, France and Italy, has caused a huge urban expansion and consolidation of a highly densified harbour front. The environmental consequences should bring about the future growth of the existing system of ports through its re-qualification development. The article provides a list of 6 strategies for the future improvement of ports that correspond to the areas of research in the international port literature. These ideas had been deeply developed in previous works from different disciplines, but they are now put together in order to offer a general vision of the debate: (1) marine strategy and integrated coastal management, (2) sustainable port infrastructures, (3) port networking initiatives, (4) regionalization of ports, (5) urban and landscape connectivity, and (6) social integration of ports. The text collects some literature on each of the views and suggests throughout the topics some ideas to be considered for existing ports in general and specifically for the Spanish Mediterranean ports.

Discard management: A spatial multi-criteria approach

Pennino MGrazia, Vilela R, Valeiras J, Bellido JM. Discard management: A spatial multi-criteria approach. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2017 ;77:144 - 151. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X16307333
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Discard management needs to draw on scientific research and advice, usually supported by specific statistical modeling analysis. A wide range of statistical analysis methods were applied to fishery data in an attempt to distinguish factors that influence the species discard composition. While such approaches are important, they are still incomplete for disaggregating the economic and spatial-temporal factors for analyzing of this process and obtain a whole view of this issue. Our study aims to fill this gap by identifying, describing, and quantifying factors that influence discards of trawl fisheries using a multivariate approach based on five complementary aspects: “economic”, “vessel characteristics”, “spatial”, “temporal” and “environmental”. In addition, a spatial multi-criteria approach were used to investigate discard hot-spot areas using ecological criteria such as vulnerability and resilience of the discarded species. Using these ecological criteria will concentrate conservation efforts on the most relevant sites minimizing discards of a variety of potentially vulnerable species. This approach was applied to a case study of a multi-species demersal bottom trawl fisheries in north Spain, Cantabrian Sea (ICES area VIIIc). Results showed how spatial and economic factors highly affect species discard composition, identifying specific spatial-temporal discard hot-spots to be preferentially avoided by fishers. Mitigation measures for future fisheries management strategies should be implemented at multiple stages of the discarding process, both in the selection of the fishing grounds and the economic valorization of the discarded species.

Incorporating economics into fisheries management frameworks in Australia

Emery TJ, Gardner C, Hartmann K, Cartwright I. Incorporating economics into fisheries management frameworks in Australia. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2017 ;77:136 - 143. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X16305000
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A large gap has been identified between the current and optimal economic performance of wild-capture commercial fisheries in Australia. Economic approaches have the potential to assist fisheries to bridge this gap, such as bio-economic models that combine biology with fishing costs to evaluate the economic performance of a broad range of management measures. Economic objectives are prevalent in overarching Australian fisheries legislation, however economic data is often not collected and economic analyses or instruments not broadly applied. This paper reviews selected Australian fisheries to demonstrate the accrued economic benefits from applying formal bio-economic models and conducting empirical analyses of the impact of supply on product value. Challenges to the implementation and continued use of economic analyses and instruments are discussed including: (i) short-term transition costs and associated trade-offs between ecological, economic, social and political objectives; (ii) scarce logistical and financial capacity to collect and analyse economic data; (iii) a lack of desire among industry to change and transition to economic targets such as maximum economic yield (MEY), particularly when it is associated with lower catches; and (iv) a lack of economic literacy among fisheries managers and industry. It is contended that many of these challenges initially arise from an absence of clearly identified and prioritised objectives within overarching legislation and management plans. Once objectives are prioritised, limited resources can be allocated more efficiently to improve data collection, economic analysis and increase awareness as well as education of managers and industry.

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