2017-03-22

Natural recovery of Zostera noltii seagrass beds and benthic nematode assemblage responses to physical disturbance caused by traditional harvesting activities

Branco J, Pedro S, Alves AS, Ribeiro C, Materatski P, Pires R, Caçador I, Adão H. Natural recovery of Zostera noltii seagrass beds and benthic nematode assemblage responses to physical disturbance caused by traditional harvesting activities. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022098117301417
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

In the intertidal seagrass beds of Zostera noltii of Mira estuary (SW, Portugal) the harvesting practices are frequent. The traditional bivalve harvesting not only affects the target species as the remaining biological assemblages. The main aim of this study was to assess the disturbance caused by sediment digging in the recovery of the seagrass beds habitat, through an experimental fieldwork. The responses of the seagrass plant condition, the sediment microbial activity and the nematode assemblages were investigated after the digging activity in seagrass beds. A total of four experimental plots were randomly demarcated in situ, two plots were subjected to the disturbance - “Digging” - while other two were “Control”; the sampling occurred in five occasions, from May to October: T0–before digging; T1–14 days after digging; T2–45 days; T3–75 days; and T4–175 days. The environmental variables measured in the sediment and the photosynthetic efficiency (α) of the Z. noltii plants in each plot and sampling occasion registered similar values, throughout the experiment. The extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA) clearly presented a temporal pattern, although no significant differences were obtained between digging and control plots. Nematode assemblages registered high densities, revealing the absence of the digging effect: control plots maintained similar density and diversity throughout the experiment, while the density and diversity between digging plots was significantly different at T0 and T4; the trophic composition was similar for both control and digging plots, characterized mainly by non-selective deposit feeders (1B) and epigrowth feeders (2A).Organic matter, nitrate and mean grain size explain a significant amount of the variation in the nematode genera composition. This study demonstrated the capacity of the seagrass habitat to recover under low intensity physical disturbance associated to harvesting.

Screening-level risk assessment applied to dredging of polluted sediments from Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Silveira AElisa F, Nascimento JR, Sabadini-Santos E, Bidone ED. Screening-level risk assessment applied to dredging of polluted sediments from Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17302229
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Guanabara Bay is characterized by predominant eutrophication and anoxic sediments with a mixture of pollutants. The risk prognosis associated with the dumping of its dredged sediments into the open ocean was addressed by our algorithm. Our algorithm could prioritize areas, characterize major processes related to dredging, measure the potential risk of sediments, and predict the effects of sediment mixing. The estimated risk of dredged sediment was > 10-fold than that of ocean sediments. Among metals, mercury represented 50–90% of the total risk. The transfer of dredged material into the ocean or internal dumping in the bay requires a 1:10 dilution to mitigate the risk and bring the risk levels close to that in the EPA criteria, below which there is less likelihood of adverse effects to the biota, and a 1:100 dilution to maintain the original characteristics of the ocean disposal control area. Our algorithm indicator can be used in the design of both aquatic and continental disposal of dredged materials and their management.

Community energy and emissions planning for tidal current turbines: A case study of the municipalities of the Southern Gulf Islands Region, British Columbia

Sangiuliano SJoseph. Community energy and emissions planning for tidal current turbines: A case study of the municipalities of the Southern Gulf Islands Region, British Columbia. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews [Internet]. 2017 ;76:1 - 8. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364032117303428
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $37.95
Type: Journal Article

Society's dependence on fossil fuels to meet energy demands has resulted in an enormous release of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions into the atmosphere, thereby perpetuating global climate change. The consequences of climate change have prompted progressive governments such as British Columbia to establish legislative GHG emission reductions targets, which have lead to energy conscience municipalities within the province voluntarily committing to helping achieve such targets. Best practices examined from European municipalities share a common theme of renewable energy adoption and municipally-owned utilities. An emerging renewable energy technology are tidal current turbines (TCTs), which function to extract kinetic energy from the lateral movement of the tides in areas with considerable tidal velocities. This paper examines the history, physics, operational parameters, and plausible environmental impacts of TCTs in order to make a case for their sustainable implementation. The feasibility of the municipalities of North Pender Island, South Pender Island, and Saturna of the Southern Gulf Islands Region (SGIR), British Columbia, to help meet established GHG emissions reduction targets through the implementation of TCTs is analyzed, demonstrating that the deployment of 10 TCTs can produce 38,266,602 kWh/yr of electricity, mitigating 1138 t of CO2e, achieving 9.9% of the cumulative municipal GHG emissions mitigation targets. The paper then examines a case study in the Shetland Islands and Pentland Firth and Orkney Waters, Scotland, suggesting that jurisdictional regulatory powers over TCT installation and operation be devolved from the British Columbia government to the municipal governments of North Pender Island, South Pender Island, and Saturna, so that such communities can reap the benefits associated with a municipally-owned utility.

International collaboration and comparative research on ocean top predators under CLIOTOP

Hobday AJ, Arrizabalaga H, Evans K, Scale KL, Senina I, Weng KC. International collaboration and comparative research on ocean top predators under CLIOTOP. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096706451730067X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Oceanic top predators have ecological, social and economic value of global significance. These wide-ranging marine species, which include sharks, tunas and billfishes, marine mammals, turtles and seabirds, are the focus of international research attention under the Climate Impacts on Oceanic Top Predators (CLIOTOP) science programme, one of the Integrated Marine Biosphere Research (IMBeR) projects. Over more than a decade, research conducted under CLIOTOP has involved scientists from more than 30 countries, with international collaboration increasing markedly over time, and comparative analyses resulting in new knowledge and understanding of oceanic top predators. This special issue presents 27 papers arising from the 3rd CLIOTOP symposium, held in San Sebastián, Spain in September 2015, spanning topics such as conservation biology, trophic ecology, fisheries science, climate change, and adaptive management. The maturation and synthesis of CLIOTOP's collaborative research is now resulting in real-world management applications and improving understanding of potential ecological and socio-economic impacts of climate change in oceanic systems. The ultimate CLIOTOP goal of preparing both climate-sensitive predator populations and the human societies dependent on them for the impending impacts of climate change is now within reach.

Predicting cetacean distributions in data-poor marine ecosystems

Redfern JV, Moore TJ, Fiedler PC, de Vos A, Brownell RL, Forney KA, Becker EA, Ballance LT. Predicting cetacean distributions in data-poor marine ecosystems. Diversity and Distributions [Internet]. 2017 ;23(4):394 - 408. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ddi.12537/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Aim

Human activities are creating conservation challenges for cetaceans. Spatially explicit risk assessments can be used to address these challenges, but require species distribution data, which are limited for many cetacean species. This study explores methods to overcome this limitation. Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) are used as a case study because they are an example of a species that have well-defined habitat and are subject to anthropogenic threats.

Location

Eastern Pacific Ocean, including the California Current (CC) and eastern tropical Pacific (ETP), and northern Indian Ocean (NIO).

Methods

We used 12 years of survey data (377 blue whale sightings and c. 225,400 km of effort) collected in the CC and ETP to assess the transferability of blue whale habitat models. We used the models built with CC and ETP data to create predictions of blue whale distributions in the data-poor NIO because key aspects of blue whale ecology are expected to be similar in these ecosystems.

Results

We found that the ecosystem-specific blue whale models performed well in their respective ecosystems, but were not transferable. For example, models built with CC data could accurately predict distributions in the CC, but could not accurately predict distributions in the ETP. However, the accuracy of models built with combined CC and ETP data was similar to the accuracy of the ecosystem-specific models in both ecosystems. Our predictions of blue whale habitat in the NIO from the models built with combined CC and ETP data compare favourably to hypotheses about NIO blue whale distributions, provide new insights into blue whale habitat, and can be used to prioritize research and monitoring efforts.

Main conclusions

Predicting cetacean distributions in data-poor ecosystems using habitat models built with data from multiple ecosystems is potentially a powerful marine conservation tool and should be examined for other species and regions.

Fish, Trade and Food Security: Moving beyond ‘Availability’ Discourse in Marine Conservation

Fabinyi M, Dressler WH, Pido MD. Fish, Trade and Food Security: Moving beyond ‘Availability’ Discourse in Marine Conservation. Human Ecology [Internet]. 2017 ;45(2):177 - 188. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10745-016-9874-1
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

The goal of food security increasingly serves as an objective and justification for marine conservation in the global south. In the marine conservation literature this potential link is seldom based upon detailed analysis of the socioeconomic pathways between fish and food security, is often based on limited assumptions about increasing the availability of fish stocks, and downplays the role of trade. Yet, the relationship between fish and food security is multi-faceted and complex, with various local contextual factors that mediate between fish and food security. We use data from interviews and food security assessment methods to examine the relationship between fish and food security among fishing households in San Vicente, Palawan province, Philippines. We highlight the local role of income and trade, emphasising the sale of fish to purchase food not easily accessible for fishers, particularly staples. In particular, we show that because rice is the primary staple of food security for these households, fish must be traded with the intent of buying rice. Trade is therefore central to household food security. We argue that the relationship between fish and food security must be considered in greater depth if marine conservation is to engage with food security as an objective.

Wave Exposure Structures Oyster Distribution on Natural Intertidal Reefs, But Not on Hardened Shorelines

Theuerkauf SJ, Eggleston DB, Puckett BJ, Theuerkauf KW. Wave Exposure Structures Oyster Distribution on Natural Intertidal Reefs, But Not on Hardened Shorelines. Estuaries and Coasts [Internet]. 2017 ;40(2):376 - 386. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12237-016-0153-6
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Intertidal oyster reefs can protect estuarine shorelines from wave erosion and sea-level rise, and recognition of these ecosystem services has fueled global efforts to conserve and restore these reefs. Although intertidal oyster reefs are valued for attenuating wave erosion, little attention has been paid to the effects of wave exposure on their distribution. The present study characterized the role of wave exposure in determining the distribution of natural intertidal oyster reefs and of oysters on hardened shorelines (bulkhead and riprap revetments). Wave exposure was determined using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-developed Wave Exposure Model (WEMo), which integrates adjacent water depth, fetch, and processed wind information, among other variables. Field mapping of oyster reefs, defined as ≥10 oysters m−2, in Pamlico and Core sounds, North Carolina, USA, was conducted in summer 2014. Hardened shorelines and associated oyster densities were mapped for Pamlico Sound only. A narrow wave exposure threshold (~500 J m−1) was identified above which natural intertidal reefs did not occur and below which reef presence was apparently dependent on other structuring variables, such as salinity at the time of sampling and the grain size of surrounding sediments. Wave exposure was not correlated with the presence of oysters on hardened shorelines. The application of WEMo in the present study should be useful for selecting locations and materials for intertidal oyster reef restoration.

Effectiveness of short-term knowledge communication on Baltic Sea marine genetic biodiversity to public managers

Lundmark C, Andersson K, Sandström A, Laikre L. Effectiveness of short-term knowledge communication on Baltic Sea marine genetic biodiversity to public managers. Regional Environmental Change [Internet]. 2017 ;17(3):841 - 849. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10113-016-1077-1
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The aim of this study is to assess the impact of two forms of short-term knowledge communication—lectures and group deliberations—on public managers’ policy beliefs regarding genetic biodiversity in the Baltic Sea. Genetic biodiversity is a key component of biological variation, but despite scientific knowledge and far-reaching political goals, genetic biodiversity remains neglected in marine management. Previous research highlights lack of knowledge among managers as one explanation to the implementation deficit. This multidisciplinary study builds on the identified need for an improved knowledge transfer between science and ongoing management. A basic knowledge package on genetic biodiversity in the Baltic Sea was presented as either a lecture or a deliberative group discussion to two separate samples of public managers who are involved in Baltic Sea and other biodiversity management at the regional level in Sweden. The empirical findings show that the communicated information has an impact on the public managers’ beliefs on genetic biodiversity of the Baltic Sea. Lectures seem more efficient to transfer knowledge on this theme. Those who received information through a lecture strengthen their confidence in area protection as a management tool to conserve genetic diversity. They were also more convinced of the obligation of authorities at national and regional level to take on larger responsibility for genetic conservation than those managers who participated in a deliberative discussion.

The role of seagrass meadows, mangrove forests, salt marshes and reed beds as nursery areas and food sources for fishes in estuaries

Whitfield AK. The role of seagrass meadows, mangrove forests, salt marshes and reed beds as nursery areas and food sources for fishes in estuaries. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries [Internet]. 2017 ;27(1):75 - 110. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11160-016-9454-x
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Each year millions of larval and 0+ juvenile fishes are recruited into estuarine fish populations around the world. For several decades the roles of littoral aquatic and emergent macrophyte habitats as nursery areas for many of these species have been studied and debated at length. This review attempts to collate the published literature and provide a synopsis of the varying, and sometimes conflicting, views on this topic. A large number of studies have shown that a range of species and an abundance of juvenile fishes are associated with littoral macrophytes in estuaries, some of which are found almost exclusively within particular plant habitats. Other studies have shown the movement of certain juvenile fishes from one type of littoral plant habitat to another as they grow and develop new feeding strategies and dietary requirements. Overall, it would appear that seagrass beds and mangrove forests are particularly favoured by fishes as nursery areas in both estuaries and the nearshore marine environment, and that the loss of these habitats leads to a decline in juvenile fish diversity and abundance. Salt marshes and reed beds generally have a lower diversity of fishes than seagrass and mangrove habitats, possibly due to the more temperate location of salt marshes and the dense structure of some reed beds. Stable isotope studies in particular are providing increasing evidence that carbon assimilated by juvenile fishes in mangrove, marsh and reed habitats is not primarily derived from these macrophytes but comprises a mixture of these sources and a diverse range of macro- and microalgae, particularly epiphytic, epipsammic, epipelic and epilithic diatoms and algae found in these areas. The closest trophic link between the macrophyte food chain and associated fishes occurs in seagrass habitats where a significant portion of the overall macrophyte leaf biomass often consists of epiphytic algae and diatoms. Structurally, mangrove forests, salt marshes and reed beds provide more substantial and complex habitats for juvenile fish refuge, but some of these habitats are constrained with regard to nursery provision by being fully exposed at low tide. Under such circumstances the small fish are sometimes forced into creeks and channels where larger piscivorous fishes are often present. Overall, in terms of a broad ranking of the four habitats as potential fish nursery areas, seagrass meadows are ranked first, followed by mangrove forests, salt marshes and then reed beds. This ranking does not imply that the lower ranked habitats are unimportant, since these plants perform a myriad of ecosystem services that are not related to the provision of fish nursery areas, e.g. bank stabilization. It is also emphasized that the protection of specific plant species should not be encouraged because it is important to have an ecosystem approach to conservation so that the diversity of habitats and their connectivity for fishes is maintained.

Sustainable management of Australia’s coastal seascapes: a case for collecting and communicating quantitative evidence to inform decision-making

Wegscheidl CJ, Sheaves M, McLeod IM, Hedge PT, Gillies CL, Creighton C. Sustainable management of Australia’s coastal seascapes: a case for collecting and communicating quantitative evidence to inform decision-making. Wetlands Ecology and Management [Internet]. 2017 ;25(1):3 - 22. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11273-016-9515-x
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Australia’s developed coasts are a heavily competed space, subject to urban, industrial and agricultural development. A diversity of habitats, such as mangroves, saltmarshes and seagrasses, comprise Australia’s coastal seascape and provide numerous benefits including fish productivity, carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling, coastal protection and recreation. Decision makers need to be able to weigh up the relative costs and benefits of coastal development, protection or repair and to do this they need robust, accessible and defensible data on the ecological function and economic value of Australia’s coastal seascapes. We reviewed the published literature, with a focus on saltmarsh as a vulnerable ecological community, to determine the availability of information on key ecological functions that could inform ecosystem service valuation. None of the publications we reviewed quantified nutrient cycling, coastal protection or recreation functions. Only 13 publications presented quantitative information on carbon sequestration and fish productivity. These were limited geographically, with the majority of studies on sub-tropical and temperate saltmarsh communities between south-east Queensland and Victoria. This demonstrates a lack of quantitative information needed to substantiate and communicate the value of Australia’s saltmarshes in different locations, scales and contexts. Research should focus on addressing these knowledge gaps and communicating evidence in a relevant form and context for decision-making. We discuss four principles for research funding organisations and researchers to consider when prioritising and undertaking research on key ecological functions of Australia’s saltmarshes, and coastal seascapes more broadly, to support sustainable coastal development, protection and repair for long-term economic and community benefit.

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