Marine Debris

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Posted on October 12, 2017 - 11:41am, by abrown
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Via The Guardian

Plastic Bio-Beads, which are used to filter chemical and organic contaminants from sewage, are spilling into the ocean from UK wastewater treatment plants according to a new study.

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on October 11, 2017 - 8:53pm, by abrown
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Via The Guardian

The European Union will not implement a tax on single-use plastics and will instead focus on raising public awareness of the damage consumer plastics do to the oceans to hopefully change the way plastics are produced.

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on October 4, 2017 - 1:59pm, by abrown
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Via News Deeply

"The 5 Gyres Institute’s pilot program takes high school students on ocean expeditions to show them how to collect and analyze plastic trash – with the goal of inspiring careers as scientists, policymakers and advocates."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on October 3, 2017 - 5:25pm, by abrown
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Via The Guardian

According to an analysis by Greenpeace, Coca Cola "increased its production of throwaway plastic bottles last year by well over a billion" putting production at more than 110 billion bottles each year. 

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on September 29, 2017 - 10:55am, by abrown
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Via Phys.org

"The 2011 Japanese tsunami set the stage for something unprecedented. For the first time in recorded history, scientists have detected entire communities of coastal species crossing the ocean by floating on makeshift rafts. Nearly 300 species have appeared on the shores of Hawaii and the U.S. West Coast attached to tsunami debris, marine biologists from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Williams College and other institutions reported in the journal Science on Thursday."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on September 29, 2017 - 10:25am, by nwehner
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Via The Washington Post

"[Japanese tsunami marine debris] ferried a lot of animals, as the scientists described in a paper published Thursday in the journal Science. During six years of study, from June 2012 to February, Carlton and his colleagues counted more than 280 species of Japanese hitchhikers on 600 pieces of debris. Most were spineless marine critters: sea stars, sea slugs, oysters, barnacles, mussels, amphipods, bryozoa and isopods."

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