Webinar Archives

SituMap is a multi-user, multi-touch mapping application that cultivates participation, collaboration and conversation. SituMap can be installed on a touch screen device like a Microsoft surface tablet (although keyboard and mouse functionality is also supported) and allows for users to quickly (with very minimal training) map out a situation or identify spatially features that are important to them. All the line work that is drawn in SituMap is spatially defined and can be exported (no digitalizing of hardcopy maps) to a desktop GIS environment for future spatial analysis later. Maps can also be sent out to collaborators via a QR code or email. Learn more about SituMap at http://cartofusiontech.com and view a short video about SituMap’s capabilities at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HqvAgJ-6Lg. This webinar was presented by Seneca Holland of Texas A&M University, and Rick Smith of CartoFusion Technologies. Webinar co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org) and MEAM.

This webinar was presented by Paulo Maurin, Jason Philibotte, and Bob Richmond. The International Coral Reef Symposium (ICRS), being held from June 19-24, 2016, in Honolulu, Hawai’i, is the primary international meeting focused on coral reef science and management. ICRS will bring together an anticipated 2,500 coral reef scientists, policy makers, and managers from 70 different nations to present the latest research findings, case histories, and management activities and discuss the application of scientific knowledge to achieving coral reef sustainability. This 13th iteration of ICRS expands outside its traditional science realm to also include policy and management with the overall theme of "Bridging Science to Policy." Alongside the symposium, a concurrent Leadership Forum with heads of state from the Pacific is convening to talk about the most pressing issues their local reefs are facing. The presentation will share outcomes from the Leadership Forum as well as high-level scientific findings from the conference, drawing direct links to management and policy. View the conference agenda at https://sgmeet.com/icrs2016. Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, MPA News, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network.

This webinar was presented by Joan John-Norville (Programme Officer, Social and Sustainable Development Division, Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States), Michael Savarin (President, Tantan Village Development Corporation in Dominica; and Project Manager, CaMPAM-ECMMAN project), Roland Baldeo (Marine Protected Area National Coordinator, Grenada), and Lucienne Cross (TNC).

To relieve fishing pressure and provide supplementary income to coastal communities surrounding MPAs, the Eastern Caribbean Marine Managed Areas Network (ECMMAN) is implementing sustainable, alternative livelihood projects on six islands. Supported by the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), small livelihood grants were made available to qualified applicants selected by a regional committee. Projects range from eco-tourism cooperatives, agriculture projects, mooring sites, and training a network of fishers and vendors to catch and market invasive lionfish. The projects have effectively equipped displaced fishers and community members with the skills and investment needed to launch micro-enterprises. In this webinar we will hear about the Livelihood Support Fund concept and implementation, as well as from the facilitators of two national projects. Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, MPA News, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network.

This webinar was presented by Katie Arkema of Stanford University, Chantalle Clarke-Samuels of the Belize Coastal Zone Management Authority and Institute, and Gregg Verutes of WWF.

Ocean planning requires balancing numerous competing uses such as recreation and commercial fisheries, tourism, and renewable and nonrenewable energy production. To help meet the demand for information on how human actions affect ecosystems and the benefits that ecosystems provide to people, the Natural Capital Project (NatCap) developed the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) toolkit.

In 2010, Belize’s Coastal Zone Management Authority (CZMAI) partnered with WWF and NatCap to answer the question, “Where should we site coastal and ocean uses to reduce risk to marine ecosystems and enhance benefits they provide to people?” The project team used a risk assessment tool in InVEST to assess how threats to marine ecosystems posed by humans and other factors can modify ecosystem condition and function. They then applied a suite of other models within InVEST to map and measure key ecosystem services – annual production of spiny lobster, tourism and recreation, and coastal protection in this case – and changes in value under different management scenarios. This work informed Belize’s first National Integrated Coastal Zone Management Plan which was recently endorsed by the Belize government. Read more about the project at https://www.openchannels.org/node/12032. Webinar co-sponsored by MEAM, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network.

This webinar was presented by Wendy Morrison of NOAA. To prepare for and respond to current and future changes in climate and oceans, fisheries managers and scientists need tools to identify what fishery resources may be most vulnerable in a changing climate and why. The NOAA Fisheries Fish Species Climate Vulnerability Assessment Methodology uses information on species life history characteristics, species distributions and projected future climate and ocean conditions to estimate the relative vulnerability of fish species to changes in abundance or productivity (and to some extent distribution). The results help guide additional science to better understand possible climate impacts on fish species or stocks and assist fisheries decision makers in considering how to prepare for and respond to climate-related changes. NOAA scientists recently applied this new methodology to 82 fish and invertebrate species occurring on the US Northeast Shelf to assess the relative vulnerability of these species to climate change. They are in the process of expanding the assessment to additional regions including the US West Coast and Alaska. This webinar introduced the methodology and use results from the US Northeast assessment to describe the type of information created and potential uses of the results.

Learn more about the methodology at https://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/Assets/ecosystems/climate/documents/TM%20OSF3.pdf and http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0146756. Webinar co-sponsored by MEAM, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network.

Learn about how Clean Water Fund developed Rethink Disposable in partnership with San Francisco Bay Area municipalities to engage local businesses and the public in implementing upstream solutions to reduce the amount of disposable take-out food packaging ending up in creeks and San Francisco Bay. In addition to preventing marine debris, the benefits of reducing and eliminating disposables include: conserving resources, reducing waste, preventing pollution, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions throughout the lifecycle of a single-use disposable product from extraction to disposal. Minimizing single-use disposable packaging can provide environmental and economic benefits to local governments and significant cost savings to businesses. Rethink Disposable is helping lead a cultural shift towards making “reusable” the new norm.

This webinar was presented by Daniel Pauly and Dirk Zeller of the Sea Around Us and the University of British Columbia. How much fish are we really catching from the world’s oceans? Catch data are important in fisheries research, but the availability of reliable and comprehensive catch data is often taken for granted. In a large number of countries, reliable catch data are not available, and the catch data these countries submit to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are incomplete and highly variable. Given the role of FAO in world fisheries, this means that many of the “big numbers” cited when talking or writing about global fisheries are erroneous. We present a “catch reconstruction” approach that we have applied to all maritime countries of the world to overcome this situation. In this webinar, we will present our scientific approach, results from several countries illustrating the issues and problems, and the global results as presented in our recent paper. All materials and data for all maritime countries in the world (plus a wide variety of additional data and information items) are freely available for download at www.seaaroundus.org. Webinar co-sponsored by MEAM, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network.

This webinar was presented by Mark Young of the Pew Charitable Trusts. Illegal fishing is a global concern that threatens the long-term health of our oceans, worsens the impact of overfishing on critical marine ecosystems, and costs up to an estimated $23.5 billion annually. It accounts for 1 of every 5 fish taken from the world’s seas and jeopardizes the livelihoods of tens of millions of people who depend on the oceans’ resources. The Pew Charitable Trusts has partnered with the Satellite Applications Catapult to pioneer Project Eyes on the Seas. This cutting-edge technology platform combines satellite monitoring and imagery data with other information, such as fishing vessel databases and oceanographic data, to help authorities detect suspicious fishing activity. Learn more at http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/multimedia/video/2015/project-eyes-on-the-seas.

This webinar was presented by Daniel Dunn of Duke University, Sara Maxwell of Old Dominion University and Alistair Hobday of CSIRO. Ocean environments, ocean life, and ocean users are often highly mobile, but most ocean management techniques are not. This mismatch leads to ocean management that is, at times, ineffective, inefficient, or both. An emerging management approach – “dynamic ocean management” – could change that. Dynamic ocean management uses techniques that change in space and time, reflecting the actual or predicted movements of ocean life and ocean users rather than relying on traditional static measures such as fixed boundaries or seasons. This dynamic approach has the potential to narrow the spatial and temporal scope of regulations and thus reduce the social impacts of regulations (e.g., managers would close a portion of a fishing ground rather than an entire fishery to avoid exceeding bycatch limits). Most applications of dynamic ocean management to date have involved the fishing and shipping industries. But there is the potential to expand the approach to regulation of alternative energy sources (including wind, solar, and tidal energy), oil and gas production, military operations, and even mobile marine protected areas. This webinar will provide an overview of DOM, specific examples of existing DOM measures, and a management strategy evaluation of static vs dynamic management measures. Learn more about this new management approach and tools that enable it. Webinar co-sponsored by MEAM, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network.

This webinar was presented by Jen Plunket of the North Inlet-Winyah Bay NERR, Scott Lerberg of the Chesapeake Bay NERR, and Robin Weber of the Narragansett Bay NERR. Changes in climate affect ecosystems directly and interact with current stressors to impact vital coastal habitats. Adaptive capacity imparted from a system’s natural traits or potential management actions can lessen these impacts. The Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Tool for Coastal Habitats (CCVATCH) is a spreadsheet-based decision support tool that utilizes a team of local experts - land managers and researchers - to assess the possible interactions of climate change, stressors, and adaptive capacity to understand the climate vulnerabilities of a habitat. The CCVATCH Guidance Document provides background information and assessment questions for each climate-stressor interaction and adaptive capacity considerations. The spreadsheet itself calculates scores for sensitivity-exposure, adaptive capacity, and overall vulnerability. Learn more at http://www.ccvatch.com. Webinar co-sponsored by MEAM, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network.

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