Webinar Archives

This webinar originally aired on: 21 October 2021

Presented by: Paris Stefanoudis of the University of Oxford and Sheena Talma of the Nekton Foundation

Parachute science is the practice whereby international scientists, typically from higher-income countries, conduct field studies in another country, typically of lower income, and then complete the research in their home country without any further effective communication and engagement with others from that nation. It creates dependency on external expertise, does not address local research needs, and hinders local research efforts. As global hotspots of marine biodiversity, lower-income nations in the tropics have for too long been the subject of inequitable and unfair research practices. However, to date there has been little quantifiable evidence of this phenomenon in marine science. In this webinar, we will present evidence from systematic literature searches and queries that parachute science practices are still widespread in marine research and make recommendations to help change the current status quo.

This webinar originally aired on: 13 October 2021

Presented by: Samuel Brody of the Institute for a Disaster Resilient Texas at Texas A&M University at Galveston, Carlos Martin with the Brookings Institution’ Metropolitan Policy Program, and Carolyn Kousky of the Wharton Risk Center at the University of Pennsylvania

Sea level rise will cause interrelated challenges in communities around the United States. The issues extend far beyond land use planning to affect housing policy, financing for public infrastructure, insurance, fostering healthier coastal ecosystems, and more. Planning for the myriad of coastal adaptation challenges is crucial for the survival of many communities. In this webinar you will hear from expert contributors to the new book, A Blueprint for Coastal Adaptation: Uniting Design, Economics, and Policy. They will discuss what a framework for comprehensive coastal flood-risk reduction looks like and how public funding of adaptation is possible.

This webinar originally aired on: 28 September 2021

Moderator/panelists: Peter Edwards of The Pew Charitable Trusts (moderator), Rodrigo Arriagada of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (panelist), Nicole Leotaud of the Caribbean Natural Resources Institute (panelist), and David Obura of CORDIO East Africa

Many environmental scientists find that their research has less impact in the real world than they hoped for or expected. As a result, there is increasing interest in looking at where we fall short, and how we can improve. This panel discussion will feature insights and recommendations from researchers, transdisciplinary collaborators, and decision-makers with deep expertise in applying research to policy including in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. Panelists will share their experiences, highlight useful resources for scientists, and discuss different approaches to improving research impact. Attendees will be able to ask questions and vote for which questions are the most interesting to pose to the panel.

This webinar originally aired on: 16 September 2021

Presented by: Jon Hare of NOAA Fisheries

Ecosystem-based management is a ‘wicked problem’, that is, a problem that is impossible or nearly impossible to solve because it is so complex. When I made the switch from scientist to scientific administrator in NOAA Fisheries in 2016, I brought a natural scientist’s perspective to ecosystem-based management (EBM), emphasizing understanding the components of an ecosystem and providing this understanding to managers as scientific advice. As I embarked on my new job – working with fishers to reduce the risk of entanglement to North Atlantic Right Whales; providing advice on how to balance the needs of offshore wind-energy development, commercial and recreational fishing, and wildlife conservation; and working to bring climate and ecosystem information into fisheries management – I came to realize that a different approach to management and decision-making – incrementalism – is needed. Incrementalism recognizes stakeholders (including scientists) have different perspective of the issues and that decision-making represents a compromise among these different perspectives. It provides for continued work on a problem and implements decisions stepwise with the participation of all stakeholders. In this webinar, I will discuss the origins of incrementalism, how it can be applied to fisheries management and marine EBM, and 10 lessons that I have learned for carrying out NOAA Fisheries’ mission to provide advice “backed by sound science and an ecosystem-based approach to management”.

This webinar originally aired on: 26 August 2021

Presented by: Caroly Shumway of the Center for Behavior and Climate

More and more environmental practitioners are incorporating behavior change into their efforts to increase pro-environmental action, building off the success of the medical community in using behavior change to improve health. Cities, national governments, and utility agencies are some of the groups driving this trend. By increasing response efficacy (the belief that one can actually do something), we can help drive the behavior and social change needed to solve our climate crisis; response efficacy is one of the strongest influencing factors for public action. This webinar by The Center for Behavior and Climate (CBC) will teach you nine principles behind behavior change and how to apply these interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary principles to increase individual and collective climate action for the oceans and beyond. From tackling habits to worldview to social influences to framing, we will provide case studies showing the impact of each behavioral tool.

This webinar originally aired on: 17 August 2021

Presented by: Trisia Farrelly of Massey University

Over 130 countries have declared support for a global agreement to combat marine litter and microplastics. There are numerous processes underway to build momentum towards an ambitious global plastics agreement at the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA) 5.2 in February 2022. This webinar will discuss why a growing number of countries have indicated support for a plastic pollution treaty and what it could look like. Dr. Farrelly is an environmental anthropologist with research expertise in the political ecology of plastic pollution including national, regional, and international plastic pollution policy; product stewardship; waste colonialism; and related social and environmental justice. She is co-founder of the New Zealand Product Stewardship Council and the Aotearoa Plastic Pollution Alliance and has been a member of UNEA’s Expert Group and the United Nations Environment Programme’s Scientific Advisory Committee on Marine Litter and Microplastics since 2017.

This webinar originally aired on: 07 July 2021

Presented by: Peter Jones of University College London

MPA governance is the modification of human behavior (e.g., fishing, tourism, coastal development activities) through an appropriate combination of incentives – including economic, legal, participation, communication, and knowledge incentives. Previous research on MPA governance case studies has developed and explored the hypothesis that the use of diverse incentives is critical to developing MPA governance that is both effective (i.e., they achieve conservation objectives and are not “paper parks) and equitable (i.e., local customs and traditional ways of life are conserved, participation of local people is provided for, the costs and benefits of conservation are fairly shared). This webinar presents 28 new case studies (including a case study of the emerging policy framework for MPAs beyond national jurisdiction) to test this hypothesis and develop practical guidance for MPA managers and policy practitioners on how to combine a diversity of governance incentives to promote effectiveness and equity. Our research found that while many MPAs already employ a diversity of incentives, many of the incentives needed to be strengthened and others needed to be introduced.

This webinar originally aired on: 22 June 2021

Presented by: Stuart Fulton of COBI

We were all shocked in 2020 when Microsoft introduced Productivity Score which collects workplace data on employees. Nobody likes to feel that their telephone or computer is spying on them. Yet we often design technology for fisheries where data collected by a fisher disappears into the cloud, never to be seen by the fisher again. Now is the time to create a more just digital economy where all participants reap the benefits of their actions. In this webinar we present Innovación Azul, a digital ecosystem that connects 300,000 small-scale fishers in Mexico and mobilizes knowledge, innovation, and solutions that can be adopted in Mexico, Latin America, and beyond. Innovación Azul includes PescaData, a free and interactive mobile application that helps fishers and fishing organizations offer their products and services in the marketplace; share knowledge and seek solutions to common problems; and record catch, fishing effort, expenses, product prices, and more. We will also discuss the principles of data sovereignty in small-scale fisheries; how data could be used for management, research, and value creation; and the benefits - and challenges - of designing technology for small-scale fishers.

This webinar originally aired on: 17 June 2021

Presented by: Andre Buchheister of Humboldt State University, David Chagaris of University of Florida, Daniel Howell of the Institute of Marine Research, Karen Abrams of NOAA Fisheries, and Emily Knight of the Lenfest Ocean Program (moderator)

In a move heralded as a significant step in incorporating ecosystem approaches in fisheries management, the US Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is now using ecological reference points (ERPs) in the Atlantic menhaden fishery. In an upcoming Special Issue of Frontiers in Marine Science (papers available hereherehere, and here), researchers present how scientists and managers came together to co-develop a series of ecosystem models that ultimately made this advancement possible.

This webinar originally aired on: 06 May 2021

Presented by: Mimi D’Iorio of NOAA, Kirsten Grorud-Colvert of Oregon State University, Jennifer Sletten of the Anthropocene Institute, Jenna Sullivan-Stack of Oregon State University, and Lauren Wenzel of NOAA

The 30x30 international marine conservation commitment aims to protect at least 30% of the world’s ocean by 2030 through representative and effective networks of marine protected areas (MPAs) that are fully or highly protected. Achieving this target would benefit marine biodiversity and the people who depend on healthy oceans as well as build ocean resilience to mitigate and adapt to a changing climate. Accurate reporting on progress toward 30x30 is vital and requires current and reliable information on protected area boundaries and regulations. This presentation is the first in a series focused on how the goal is being addressed in the United States. Speakers will provide background and context for the 30x30 initiative and highlight complementary efforts underway to catalog and classify MPAs. The MPA Guide provides clarity on what the term “protected” in MPAs really means, and ProtectedSeas’ Marine Managed Area data provides spatial data on regulations, allowing analysis of the cumulative contributions of different management authorities to the same ocean space. These efforts contribute to a more complete picture of the quality and quantity of US MPAs to help move the dial towards effective ocean protection in US waters.

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