Webinar Archives

This webinar was presented by Miles Macmillan-Lawler of GRID-Arendal.

As we move towards the 2020 deadline for countries to fulfil their commitments under the Convention on Biological Diversity Aichi Target 11, now is a good time to take stock and ask the question – are we protecting the right 10% of marine area in our MPAs? Not only does Aichi Target 11 talk about conserving 10% of coastal and marine areas, it specifies the effective conservation of areas of particular importance for biodiversity and ecosystem services and ecologically representativeness as key goals. So how do we know if we are achieving this? This webinar will outline a framework for assessing the progress of MPAs in achieving these goals and present the Protected Areas Impact Maps Virtual Research Environment on the BlueBRIDGE platform (bluebridge.d4science.org/web/...), an open access application which uses this framework to assist countries in assessing their progress against Aichi Target 11 and ensuring that they get the right 10%.

Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

This webinar was presented by Mike Beck of TNC and UCSC.

Wetlands and reefs serve as barriers, buffers, and breakwaters from rising seas, swell, and storm surge. Until recently, it was not possible to put a value on the flood damages – to people and property – that these coastal habitats avert. This is changing rapidly, however, and recent studies are showing surprising results. Salt marshes can reduce annual flood damages by at least 15 percent. Mangroves can reduce annual flood damages to people and property by 25 percent across the entire nation of the Philippines – a nation that sees more super storms and typhoons than almost anywhere else. And coral reefs reduce up to 97 percent of wave energy that would otherwise hit coastlines, averting hundreds of millions of dollars in flood in flood damages every year. The protection from coastal habitats is cost-effective as well, particularly when compared to built or gray infrastructure such as seawalls or dikes. A new study uses insurance industry-based models to show that every 1 (US) dollar spent on restoring marshes and oyster reefs on the American Gulf Coast reduces storm damages by 7 (US) dollars. This talk will summarize high-level findings from the latest research on the ecology, engineering, and economics of natural infrastructure.

Webinar hosted by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

This webinar was presented by Sara Hutto of Greater Farallones Association and Lara Hansen of EcoAdapt.

This North American Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool helps marine protected area managers evaluate the implications of climate change for the habitats of their sites. The tool was created as part of a project on climate assessment and adaptation by the Commission for Environmental Cooperation.  It is available in English and Spanish and has three parts (a user guide, a set of blank worksheets, and a booklet containing sample completed worksheets), which used together allow marine protected area managers to conduct a rapid vulnerability assessment and adaptation strategy development process. This webinar will cover: 1) why the tool was created, 2) an overview of the tool (how it works, what it looks like, where to find it), 3) the experience of using the tool, and 4) additional application of the tool. Learn more about the tool here.

Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Cumulative impact tools can be useful for evaluating the environmental effects resulting from human activities in a given area. Several initiatives are underway in Europe to develop and enhance cumulative impact tools and assessments to incorporate the ecosystem-based approach in marine management, as called for in multiple policy frameworks (e.g., Marine Strategy Framework Directive, Maritime Spatial Planning Directive, Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) Directive, and regional seas conventions such as the Barcelona Convention). This webinar will share latest developments on cumulative impact tools from Europe, including examples of their application from Portugal and Montenegro. The webinar is co-organized by the EU MSP Platform (msp-platform.eu), an assistance mechanism, operating under an EU funded service contract and providing administrative and technical assistance to EU Member States in the implementation of the EU’s MSP Directive. It assists the Commission in preparing technical background information and meetings which are linked to the implementation of the Directive. The EU MSP Platform recently organized an expert roundtable on cumulative impact tools for maritime spatial planning (msp-platform.eu/events/cumulative-impacts-tools-expert-roundtable). Conclusions from this roundtable will be shared during the webinar, including limitations and opportunities for further incorporating these tools in MSP and SEA processes.

Webinar hosted by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

This webinar was presented by Rachel Lincoln Sarnoff, Executive Director of The 5 Gyres Institute.

Through the 5 Gyres nix the 6 Action Campaign, thousands of people have pledged to refuse single-use polystyrene plastic. What does it mean to Nix the 6? #sneakystyrene polysytrene products are everywhere, from coffee cup lids to straws, cutlery and cups (even red SOLO cups). Expanded polystyrene foam—commonly known as "Styrofoam"—is basically polystyrene that's expanded with air. You can identify these plastics by the number "6" on the bottom. When you Nix the 6, you pledge to refuse these single-use plastics.

Why is this so important? 5 Gyres has seen how individual decisions like these can snowball into massive change. Our 2012 study that discovered plastic microbeads in the Great Lakes inspired a movement, culminating with major corporate phase out—think L’Oreal and Johnson & Johnson—and statewide bans on both coasts. In 2015, President Obama signed a federal microbeads ban into law!

Like microbeads, polystyrene plastics are environmental hazards. They are extremely toxic to make and difficult to recycle. Polystyrene and "Styrofoam" are even banned from many recycling programs because of contamination problems—less than 2% of polystyrene was recycled in 2013.

With local polystyrene bans on many ballots this year and a statewide ban being considered in California, this is the year to join the movement. We did it before with microbeads—now it's time for a polystyrene ban!

In this webinar, we’ll cover the new 5 Gyres white paper on polystyrene and reproductive toxicity, activism resources, and our partnership with the Post Landfill Action Network (PLAN) to support bans on college campuses—even in preemptive states.

Meanwhile, look for the #sneakystyrene hashtag to follow the campaign on social media.

Webinar co-sponsored by EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OCTO).

Webinar presented by Paul Whitaker of KSAT.

Kongsberg Satellite Services (KSAT) is a Norwegian organization that operates a global network of satellite antennas, handling over 30,000 satellites passes per month from a diverse portfolio of sensors. With ground stations at both poles, KSAT is able to communicate with earth observation satellites every 40 minutes – including cloud-penetrating SAR (synthetic aperture radar), high-resolution optical (capable of identifying vessel types and specifics), and AIS (which can provide detailed information about vessel identities and route specifics when in use). As the number of satellites in orbit continues to grow exponentially, KSAT continues to serve as a single source for accessing information about the marine environment, including vessel information, from anywhere in the world in a matter of minutes. This webinar will provide an overview of KSAT’s services and then seek to learn more about the needs of the MPA community, including identifying potential partners for pilot projects to test the utility of KSAT’s services for managing MPAs.

Webinar hosted by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

What do you need your conservation planning software to do? Listening session for the modernization of NatureServe Vista with Patrick Crist of NatureServe.

NatureServe Vista is currently an ArcGIS extension that supports general scenario-based assessment at multiple scales, ecological assessments, mitigation planning, and area planning (for multiple objectives) and ongoing adaptive management in any environment (marine, terrestrial, freshwater). NatureServe, founder and co-coordinator of the EBM Tools Network, is embarking on a $500K full modernization of this tool over the next 15 months. The goal of this 90-minute listening session is to get input from the coastal-marine practitioner community to make sure coastal-marine use interests are represented in tool assessment, planning, and mitigation functionality. This session will present plans for the new version of the tool and get participant feedback. To learn more about NatureServe Vista generally, visit natureserve.org/vista. (The 8-min video may be particularly useful.)

Webinar hosted by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

This webinar was presented by Ingrid Giskes (Chair of the Global Ghost Gear Initiative Steering Group, and Head of Campaign for Sea Change, World Animal Protection), David Parker (Blue Ventures, and Vice-Chair of the Global Ghost Gear Initiative), and Joan Drinkwin (Associate Partner, Natural Resource Consultants).

Each year, worldwide, millions of animals living in our oceans are mutilated and killed by abandoned, lost or discarded fishing gear – ‘ghost gear’. These animals suffer severe acute or chronic welfare impacts; ranging from drowning in minutes to suffering from debilitating wounds for months or years before finally dying.

In 2014, World Animal Protection launched its Sea Change campaign with the Fishing’s Phantom Menace report, highlighting that cross-sectoral global collaboration was the only way to combat ghost gear. In 2015, World Animal Protection launched the Global Ghost Gear Initiative (GGGI), bringing together a critical group of stakeholders and experts on this topic. The GGGI addresses sea-based sources of marine debris, specifically abandoned, lost, and discarded fishing gear, and contributes to the delivery of the first target (14.1) under United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 14, calling for a significant reduction in marine debris of all kinds by 2025.

Now, as we head into 2018, join us to hear about how the GGGI’s three working groups – Building Evidence, Best Practice, and Solutions – have played a key role in formulating a global approach and strategy to tackling this deadly issue, and working towards ghost gear-free seas.

Webinar cosponsored by MarineDebris.Info and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OCTO).

This webinar was presented by Jean-Luc Solandt of the Marine Conservation Society and Tom Mullier of Marine Mapping Ltd

Political parties in England and Scotland are working together to develop a network of new MPAs (known as marine conservation zones or MCZs in England). The UK government is designating a final tranche of MCZs by the end of 2018. UK MCZs are different from other MPAs worldwide, however, because management measures for MCZs aren’t explicit for entire sites (or zones) but are instead eventually implemented for individual species and habitat features within sites. This leads to a complex system where regulators assemble evidence of cause and damage (or the potential for damage) to features in sites and manage accordingly. With this system, elements such as connectivity, representation, and replication can be assessed relatively easily, but it is difficult to assess level of protection. In addition to working on Brexit, the UK government – and local regulators (Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities) – have been working to implement fisheries management measures in English sites in recent years. The NGO Marine Conservation Society (MCS) is keen for the public, sea users, and journalists to become aware of where proactive regulation is happening, and for which habitats. To this end, MCS has worked with Marine Mapping Ltd to develop a tool MPA Reality Check (map.mpa-reality-check.org) to show were active fisheries management is taking place in these English MPAs. This webinar will describe the tool, political reasons for implementation of controls, and where (e.g., offshore sites) there has been limited progress due to EU processes.

Webinar hosted by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe)

This webinar was presented by Nick Wehner, OCTO’s Director of Open Initiatives and the Project Director for MarXiv.

RELX Group, the holding company that owns Elsevier, the world's largest publisher, brought in profits that exceeded US $1.2 billion in 2017 alone. With a profit margin of 37%, they make more profit per-dollar than Google and Apple combined! So what can you as an author do to stop feeding this profit-hungry beast?

Elsevier and other for-profit publishers allow you to make your research available for free to the world via Green Open Access (Green OA). Papers available for free this way are cited 30% more on average. If they're licensed openly, they can also be text-mined and translated for free, too -- all without paying costly OA fees to the publisher!

Get your research published where you want (even behind a pay-wall) by making it freely-available via Green OA with MarXiv: the free research repository for the ocean and marine climate sciences. Not only can you make your research Green OA for free, but you can also share your data and other research outputs for free. Give your group’s reports a free DOI, too, and ensure they’re indexed in academic search engines like Google Scholar.

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