Webinar Archives

This webinar originally aired on 10 March 2020.

Advancements in animal tracking technology are enabling us to collect far more data on the migratory patterns of marine species than ever before. These data are changing the way we think about how the world’s oceans are connected – they are broadening our understanding of the habitats that marine migratory species depend on as well as the pathways between them. However, while the amount of data is growing exponentially, synthesis of and access to information on migratory connectivity to inform management and policy has lagged behind. A new consortium Migratory Connectivity in the Ocean (MiCO) is working to transform these data into actionable knowledge that can be incorporated into international management and policy frameworks to protect and sustainably manage migratory species. MiCO provides a global geospatial knowledge hub on migratory connectivity that is open access and easy to use. This webinar will provide information on how to use this knowledge hub as well as contribute to it. Learn more about MiCO at https://mico.eco.

This webinar originally aired on 5 March 2020.

This webinar features experts from Washington, Oregon, and California highlighting their clean-up, education, and regulatory actions to curtain marine debris. These efforts include: 1) a project to remove over 382 tons of creosoted wood and other marine debris from the shorelines of the Puget Sound; 2) professional development training workshops for teachers to influence marine debris prevention among students and the community; and 3) the world's first disposable-free dining ordinance that requires that all on-site dining use reusable foodware and promotes reusables for take-out dining by charging for disposable cups.

Presented by: Casey Palmer-McGee of the Samish Island Nation, Cait Goodwin and Tracy Cres of Oregon Sea Grant, and Miriam Gordon of UPSTREAM.

Presented by: Jeffrey Peterson, author of A New Coast: Strategies for Responding to Devastating Storms and Rising Seas

Due to climate change, devastating storms and sea level rise will increasingly threaten vibrant communities, critical infrastructure, and vital natural systems. This webinar will present actionable policy guidance for how governments, businesses, and engaged citizens can work together to prepare for a changing coast.

Proposals include gradually phasing out incentives for remaining in areas vulnerable to sea level rise (e.g., coverage under the National Flood Insurance Program), implementing a national permit program to limit building in areas destined to become wetlands or ocean, and a requirement for posting bond to cover costs of removing structures prior to sea level inundation. The final proposal is a comprehensive national program to support an effective response to the short and long-term challenges of worsening storms and sea level rise, as well as an outline of the steps needed to make a national program a reality.

Presented by: Dr. Patrick Crist of PlanIt Forward LLC.

A consortium of the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, US federal agencies, and other organizations recently assessed the vulnerability of US coasts to a variety of flooding threats and identified areas of natural value or potential to provide resiliency to human assets and populations. This webinar will present results from seven “targeted watersheds” –Charleston Harbor (South Carolina), Delaware Bay (Delaware and New Jersey), Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island and Massachusetts), Portland and Midcoast Maine, St. Johns River (Florida), San Francisco Bay and Coast, Savannah River (Georgia) – that were assessed by NatureServe using its Vista decision support software. The work included extensive stakeholder engagement via multiple workshops and webinars and produced reports, data packages, and decision support systems for each watershed. These products are now available to the public. This work was led by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) with the collaboration of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency (NOAA), the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), NatureServe, and the National Environmental Modeling and Analysis Center (NEMAC). The webinar will be presented by Dr. Patrick Crist who led the NatureServe projects and is now Principal of PlanIt Forward LLC.

Presented by: Nick Salafsky of Foundations of Success.

There is growing interest in evidence-based conservation, yet there are no widely accepted standard definitions of evidence, let alone guidance on how to use it in the context of conservation and natural resource management practice. In this talk, I will first draw on insights of evidence-based practice from different disciplines to define evidence as being “the relevant information used to assess one or more hypotheses related to a question of interest.” I then present a typology of different kinds of information, hypotheses, and evidence and show how these different types can be used in different steps of conservation practice. In particular, it is important to distinguish between specific evidence used to assess project hypotheses and generic evidence used to assess generic hypotheses. I next build on this typology to develop a decision tree to support practitioners in how to appropriately use available specific and generic evidence in a given conservation situation. Finally, I conclude with a discussion of how to better promote and enable evidence-based conservation in projects and across the discipline of conservation, including the development of different types of shared evidence libraries.

Presented by: Jane Lubchenco of Oregon State University, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg of the University of Queensland, and Steve Gaines of the University of California Santa Barbara.

The 2019 IPCC report on oceans showed that impacts to the world’s ocean from climate are significant and growing. Yet the ocean can also be a major part of the solution to climate change. In 2018, the High Level Panel on Climate Change (an initiative of 14 current heads of government committed to bold climate solutions), convened an international team of scientists and other experts to evaluate the potential for ocean-based actions to contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. These include solutions ranging from ocean-based renewable energy and ocean-based transport to conservation of marine and coastal ecosystems, fisheries and aquaculture, and carbon storage in the seabed. This webinar will present the findings of the panel report, as well as two new complementary papers on ocean-based mitigation options and on the impacts of climate change to the ocean economy.

This webinar was presented by Phil Karp, Principal Knowledge Management Officer with the World Bank's Social/Urban/Rural Development and Resilience Global Practice.

Knowledge exchange, or peer-to-peer learning, is a powerful way to share, replicate, and scale up practical solutions to challenges and transform ideas into action. But designing and executing knowledge exchange to achieve intended results and integrating it as part of larger change processes remains challenging. Using its extensive experience in knowledge exchange, the World Bank has developed a systematic framework and guide to help practitioners be more effective knowledge providers, brokers, and recipients. This webinar will present the five-step framework, introduce a range of knowledge exchange instruments and activities, and discuss how this approach can be applied to marine ecosystem conservation. It will also look at the impact and implications of social media and citizen science

This webinar was presented by Jon Fisher of The Pew Charitable Trusts

Scientists devote substantial time and resources to research to help solve environmental problems. And managers and policy makers must decide which actions will lead to desired environmental outcomes, based on the best-available evidence. Yet decision-makers frequently do not use much of this evidence. They may be unaware of it, lack access to it, not understand it, or view it as irrelevant. As a result, research intended to be applied often remains unused. In this webinar we outline a set of practical steps to improve the impact of science on decision making. These steps were developed from a review of the scientific literature on this topic and the input and experiences of numerous professionals in the field. The steps can be challenging to implement but should translate into science being used to inform environmental and conservation decisions more frequently. We will leave time for and welcome discussion and feedback from webinar participants.

This webinar was presented by Gregor Schuurman of the US National Park Service, Wendy Morrison of NOAA, and Carrie Kappel of the University of California Santa Barbara.

In this world of rapid global change, managers often have limited ability to control the ultimate drivers of this change or resist or reverse ecological responses to it. Managers in this ‘brave new world’ face difficult choices as well as important opportunities to influence ecological trajectories at local, regional, and continental scales, as they work along a management spectrum from resisting, to accepting, to actively directing ecological change. Managers need clear concepts and training in navigating ecological transformation (NET) and mechanisms to coordinate transformation management across agencies and management units. The FedNET working group (composed of representatives from federal land management agencies, USGS, and NOAA) is working to help US federal land managers understand, plan for, and respond to ecological transformation to maximize conservation of species, ecosystems, and ecosystem services. The group will develop concepts, frameworks, and training opportunities to help managers navigate the “who, why, where, when, how, and what” of NET and coordinate transformation stewardship across scales. The webinar will: 1) discuss how FedNET is using the decision framework Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD), 2) present related case studies to help federal land managers understand, plan for, and respond to ecological transformation, and 3) facilitate discussion with NOAA colleagues and an Ocean Tipping Points representative on how the RAD framework might be applied to marine fisheries.

This webinar was presented by Eric Mielbrecht of EcoAdapt and Sara Hutto of the Greater Farallones Association.

Making climate change adaptation planning simple and feasible for managers, The Climate Adaptation Toolkit for Marine and Coastal Protected Areas is a new resource consisting of a complement of tools that support climate vulnerability assessment, adaptation planning, and implementation. Users are supported by essential tools including a library of over 100 curated adaptation actions organized by habitat type and climate impact, each supported by case studies and documents from CAKEx.org, and the North American Marine Protected Area Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool. The toolkit is particularly effective as it was co-created with MPA managers and experts from Canada, Mexico and the U.S., working in concert with EcoAdapt, the Greater Farallones Association, and the Commission for Environmental Cooperation. View the toolkit at cakex.org/MPAToolkit.

Co-Sponsors: Parks Canada, NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, Comisión Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas (CONANP), EcoAdapt, the Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (CAKE), the Greater Farallones Association, and the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, and OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network)

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