Webinar Archives

This webinar was presented by by Carlie Herring of NOAA.

Dive into the world of microplastics with the NOAA Marine Debris Program! Learn about what microplastics are, the different types, the impacts associated with microplastic marine debris, and future research needs.

Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org).

This webinar was presented by Ben Halpern of the University of California, Santa Barbara and Steve Katona of Conservation International.

The Ocean Health Index (OHI) is a scientific assessment framework that combines and compares biological, physical, economic, and social elements of ocean health to assess how sustainably ocean resources are utilized within a given region. The OHI team recently published its fifth annual global assessment. For this webinar, lead scientists Benjamin Halpern and Steven Katona will discuss changes in OHI scores over five years, possible causes and consequences of those changes, challenges and opportunities for composite indicators to incorporate the best available science each year, and lessons learned in repeating and improving the OHI assessment each year.

This webinar was presented by Mark Carr of University of California at Santa Cruz and Sarah Robinson of Critical Inquiries Research.

The US Marine Protected Area (MPA) Federal Advisory Committee (FAC) has a Connectivity Subcommittee charged with understanding how knowledge about ecological spatial connectivity and climate climate change can be incorporated into the design, use, and management of effective MPAs and MPA networks. The committee has summarized the current scientific understanding of: 1) different types and scales of connectivity and their ecological implications, 2) how connectivity processes create ecological linkages among marine areas, populations, communities, and ecosystems, and 3) how connectivity impacts conservation outcomes in MPAs. This webinar will summarize the work of the FAC on the implications of spatial ecological connectivity for the design and application of MPAs in a changing ocean. This work forms the basis of the FAC's recommendations to the US Secretaries of Commerce and the Interior for future US MPA management and policy.

The Washed Ashore Project uses community art created from marine debris with the help of thousands of volunteers to raise awareness about plastic pollution in order to spark changes in the consumer habits that have generated this global issue. Over the past two years, with NOAA support, Washed Ashore has worked to create a curriculum based on the goals of our project. The lessons bring together art and science to help students understand the plastic pollution issue and communicate about it using the language of the arts. Workshops to introduce the curriculum and receive feedback were held at Washed Ashore exhibit venues around the country and the curriculum was piloted in Bandon, Oregon, where Washed Ashore is based.

In this webinar, Patrick Chandler, the Washed Ashore curriculum author and project manager, discussed his experience using art to communicate, conducting teachers’ workshops, curriculum development, and shared lessons learned. For more information on the Washed Ashore curriculum, please visit http://washedashore.org/iamdc/.

There has been a lot of talk about impact investing as a source of funding for marine conservation priorities. What is impact investing? How does it work, and what can managers do to attract impact investors to fund their projects?

Join us for a webinar with Kelly Wachowicz, Managing Partner of Catch Invest, an impact investing firm supporting fishermen, conservation, and communities. Kelly will talk about investing to support sustainable fisheries and fisheries transitions and share several case studies that highlight some of the opportunities and challenges with this emerging funding tool.

This webinar was presented by Robert Weary of The Nature Conservancy.

Small Island Developing States (SIDS) are highly vulnerable to climate change. However, extremely high public debt ratios make it difficult for these countries to invest in modifying infrastructure and improving coastal and flood protection. The goal of our work is twofold: 1) to facilitate the transaction of donations and investments for climate change adaptation as well as biodiversity conservation in the marine realm and 2) provide highly indebted countries with an innovative financial tool to restructure their debt and allow for debt relief as well as secure capital flows for investments into climate change adaption activities. Protecting the “blue economy” of island states will ultimately reduce vulnerability of both marine ecosystems and the economy as a whole (e.g., through sustained fishing grounds and tourism). And debt conversions allow national governments to free capital streams and direct them into climate adaptation and marine conservation activities that ultimately will restore natural and human resilience to threats of climate change. Join us on this webinar to learn more about relevant debt conversions including how they are financed, managed, utilized, and retired. Learn more about a relevant swap for the Seychelles at https://meam.openchannels.org/news/meam/money-matters-financing-multi-sector-ocean-planning-and-management.

This webinar originally aired on 9 February 2017.

This webinar was presented by Brian Baird of The Bay Institute and Aquarium of the Bay, and Martha Honey of the Center for Responsible Travel.

MPAs require sustainable long-term funding for designation and management – including for education, outreach, monitoring, research, policy development, and enforcement. Recommendations from a new report produced by the US Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee will be discussed, along with a wide-range of approaches for obtaining external funding, important guidelines for success, and potential sources of external financing.

Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org).

This webinar was presented by Rodolphe Devillers and David Bishop of Memorial University of Newfoundland.

The Information System on Small-scale Fisheries (ISSF) is a web portal that is used to integrate, summarize, and communicate information on small-scale fisheries (SSF) globally. Based on a crowdsourcing approach, the data are all freely accessible, helping the global SSF community to better qualify and quantify SSF and their importance. The system provides diverse information, including people and organizations involved in this field, publications, and detailed profiles of SSF at specific locations. The system allows users to access data as a map or a table, generate reports, and export data for further analyses. ISSF was developed as part of the international project "Too Big to Ignore”. Access the portal at https://dory.creait.mun.ca.

Webinar co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org) and MEAM.

This webinar was presented by Nicola Beaumont of PML, Esther Wolfs of Wolfs Company, and Samir Rosado of BCZMAI.

Blue Solutions provides a global knowledge network and capacity development platform to collate, share, and generate solutions for effective management and equitable governance of our planet’s marine and coastal living spaces, and to develop capacity for the ocean community on the initiative’s priority topics. For this webinar, presenters showcased how marine ecosystem service information can be used in conservation and sustainable development decision making. Two Blue Solutions case studies were featured: “Nature’s contribution to the economy” in Bonaire and “Mapping and valuing ecosystem services for integrated management” in Belize.

This webinar was presented by Sarah Fangman of NOAA.

Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary is a small, remote marine protected area off the coast of Georgia that hosts a vibrant and diverse community of marine life. The reef's scattered rocky outcroppings and ledges provide home for an abundance of marine life including over 200 species of fish and more than 900 species of invertebrates. While the sanctuary protects an abundance of marine life, very few people know about it, and even fewer visit. With few users and very little awareness the sanctuary even exists, sanctuary staff began an evaluation process to examine the MPA's relevance and how to move the site forward into the future. This webinar will describe how the site designed and completed an analysis of the sanctuary's education, outreach and resource protection programs and how staff are working to bring more awareness to a small, remote marine protected area and ensure management effectiveness.

Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org).

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