Webinar Archives

This webinar originally aired on: 08 January 2020

Presented by: Jane Lubchenco of Oregon State University, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg of the University of Queensland, and Steve Gaines of the University of California Santa Barbara.

The 2019 IPCC report on oceans showed that impacts to the world’s ocean from climate are significant and growing. Yet the ocean can also be a major part of the solution to climate change. In 2018, the High Level Panel on Climate Change (an initiative of 14 current heads of government committed to bold climate solutions), convened an international team of scientists and other experts to evaluate the potential for ocean-based actions to contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. These include solutions ranging from ocean-based renewable energy and ocean-based transport to conservation of marine and coastal ecosystems, fisheries and aquaculture, and carbon storage in the seabed. This webinar will present the findings of the panel report, as well as two new complementary papers on ocean-based mitigation options and on the impacts of climate change to the ocean economy.

This webinar originally aired on: 10 December 2019

This webinar was presented by Phil Karp, Principal Knowledge Management Officer with the World Bank's Social/Urban/Rural Development and Resilience Global Practice.

Knowledge exchange, or peer-to-peer learning, is a powerful way to share, replicate, and scale up practical solutions to challenges and transform ideas into action. But designing and executing knowledge exchange to achieve intended results and integrating it as part of larger change processes remains challenging. Using its extensive experience in knowledge exchange, the World Bank has developed a systematic framework and guide to help practitioners be more effective knowledge providers, brokers, and recipients. This webinar will present the five-step framework, introduce a range of knowledge exchange instruments and activities, and discuss how this approach can be applied to marine ecosystem conservation. It will also look at the impact and implications of social media and citizen science

This webinar originally aired on: 03 December 2019

This webinar was presented by Jon Fisher of The Pew Charitable Trusts

Scientists devote substantial time and resources to research to help solve environmental problems. And managers and policy makers must decide which actions will lead to desired environmental outcomes, based on the best-available evidence. Yet decision-makers frequently do not use much of this evidence. They may be unaware of it, lack access to it, not understand it, or view it as irrelevant. As a result, research intended to be applied often remains unused. In this webinar we outline a set of practical steps to improve the impact of science on decision making. These steps were developed from a review of the scientific literature on this topic and the input and experiences of numerous professionals in the field. The steps can be challenging to implement but should translate into science being used to inform environmental and conservation decisions more frequently. We will leave time for and welcome discussion and feedback from webinar participants.

This webinar originally aired on: 14 November 2019

This webinar was presented by Gregor Schuurman of the US National Park Service, Wendy Morrison of NOAA, and Carrie Kappel of the University of California Santa Barbara.

In this world of rapid global change, managers often have limited ability to control the ultimate drivers of this change or resist or reverse ecological responses to it. Managers in this ‘brave new world’ face difficult choices as well as important opportunities to influence ecological trajectories at local, regional, and continental scales, as they work along a management spectrum from resisting, to accepting, to actively directing ecological change. Managers need clear concepts and training in navigating ecological transformation (NET) and mechanisms to coordinate transformation management across agencies and management units. The FedNET working group (composed of representatives from federal land management agencies, USGS, and NOAA) is working to help US federal land managers understand, plan for, and respond to ecological transformation to maximize conservation of species, ecosystems, and ecosystem services. The group will develop concepts, frameworks, and training opportunities to help managers navigate the “who, why, where, when, how, and what” of NET and coordinate transformation stewardship across scales. The webinar will: 1) discuss how FedNET is using the decision framework Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD), 2) present related case studies to help federal land managers understand, plan for, and respond to ecological transformation, and 3) facilitate discussion with NOAA colleagues and an Ocean Tipping Points representative on how the RAD framework might be applied to marine fisheries.

This webinar originally aired on: 07 November 2019

This webinar was presented by Eric Mielbrecht of EcoAdapt and Sara Hutto of the Greater Farallones Association.

Making climate change adaptation planning simple and feasible for managers, The Climate Adaptation Toolkit for Marine and Coastal Protected Areas is a new resource consisting of a complement of tools that support climate vulnerability assessment, adaptation planning, and implementation. Users are supported by essential tools including a library of over 100 curated adaptation actions organized by habitat type and climate impact, each supported by case studies and documents from CAKEx.org, and the North American Marine Protected Area Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool. The toolkit is particularly effective as it was co-created with MPA managers and experts from Canada, Mexico and the U.S., working in concert with EcoAdapt, the Greater Farallones Association, and the Commission for Environmental Cooperation. View the toolkit at cakex.org/MPAToolkit.

Co-Sponsors: Parks Canada, NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, Comisión Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas (CONANP), EcoAdapt, the Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (CAKE), the Greater Farallones Association, and the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, and OCTO (MPA News, OpenChannels, EBM Tools Network)

This webinar originally aired on: 31 October 2019

This webinar was presented by Elliott Hazen and Heather Welch of NOAA and the University of California Santa Cruz..

Dynamic ocean management (DOM) is emerging as a solution to the challenge of spatially managing species and human activities that are dynamic in space and time. DOM strategies use real-time data on environmental conditions to design management boundaries that rapidly adjust in response to the shifting nature of the ocean and its biodiversity. This webinar introduces the fisheries sustainability tool EcoCast and explores the process of building, validating, operationalizing, maintaining, and forecasting with a dynamic ocean management tool. Join this webinar to learn about some of the challenges, solutions, and considerations of applied dynamic ocean management.

This webinar originally aired on: 17 October 2019

This webinar was presented by Josie Spearman of Guana Tolomato Matanzas NERR, Ellen M. Leroy-Reed of Friends of Guana Tolomato Matanzas NERR, Dave Feliz of Elkhorn Slough NERR, Jay Haigler of Diving with a Purpose, and Lauren Swaddell of NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program

Managers of coastal and marine protected areas are responsible for places that are important for a wide range of audiences, yet we often come up short in engaging meaningfully with diverse audiences. This webinar will present brief case studies about coastal and marine protected areas and non-profit partners that are working with people from diverse backgrounds to provide opportunities to understand and enjoy our ocean and coasts. Educational initiatives from two national estuarine research reserves (NERRS) -- Guana Tolomato Matanzas (GTM) in Florida and Elkhorn Slough in California -- will be presented. GTM NERR’s educational programs have recently increased their ability to accommodate students and potential visitors with physical, emotional, and intellectual challenges and communities with little or no access to transportation. Elkhorn Slough NERR conducts after school and science mentoring programs, regular school field trips, and subsidized school transportation programs in a region with several predominantly Hispanic communities. Diving with a Purpose (DWP) is working with partners to engage and educate the community-at-large on cultural heritage resources that exist in marine protected areas throughout the US with a focus on the African Diaspora. Finally, the first Knauss (Sea Grant) Fellow from Guam will speak about her experiences.

This webinar originally aired on: 02 October 2019

This webinar was presented by Kathryn Mathias of the Conservation Finance Alliance and Wildlife Conservation Society and Nicolas Pascal of Blue finance.

Description: Coral reefs provide enormous economic value to humanity and are gaining increasing attention from donors, philanthropists, and governments. This webinar will explore the use of Conservation Trust Funds and Impact Investing to support coral reef conservation. Conservation Trust Funds (CTFs) are private, legally independent institutions that provide sustainable financing for biodiversity conservation. Impact Investing is investing in companies, organizations, and funds with the intention of generating measurable social and environmental impact alongside a financial return. Specifically, the webinar will discuss how protected area, national, and regional CTFs can raise, manage, and invest financing for coral reef conservation and restoration. The webinar will also review how impact investing can be used to manage coral reef areas through public private partnerships. This webinar is sponsored by the International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI), an informal partnership which strives to preserve coral reefs and related ecosystems around the world, as part of its collaboration with the Conservation Finance Alliance for promoting innovative financing for coral reef conservation.

This webinar originally aired on: 25 September 2019

This webinar was presented by Julianna Mullen of NERACOOS and the OAInfoExchange.org, Jenny Waddell of Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, Francis Chan of Oregon State University, and Meg Chadsey of Washington Sea Grant.

Marine protected areas (MPAs), sanctuaries, and reserves offer refuge to a wide variety of marine species, but can they also protect vulnerable organisms from the effects of ocean acidification (OA) and other climate-related stressors? Increasingly, OA scientists and MPA managers are working together to explore questions of adaptability in marine protected areas to explore this question and sharing their ideas on a dynamic new online platform called the OA Information Exchange (OAIE). In this webinar, we will: 1) provide an orientation to the OAIE to the MPA community and other new users, 2) describe how innovative collaborations between researchers and volunteer scientists are advancing both OA and MPA science in the Oregon Marine Reserves, and 3) provide examples of efforts to document changing ocean conditions and understand potential impacts of ecosystem change in Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, including how the development of a sentinel site for ocean acidification on the Olympic Coast supports OA coordination and collaboration in Washington.

This webinar originally aired on: 17 September 2019

Presented by: Mike Beck of the University of California at Santa Cruz

This webinar will provide an overview of new research on how natural defenses can reduce coastal risk. Key new findings include: 1) the global costs of storms would double if the top 1 m of coral reefs is lost, 2) coral reefs provide $1.8 billion in annual flood protection benefits to the US alone, and 3) globally, if mangroves are lost, 39% more people would be affected by floods and property damage would increase by US$82 billion. This webinar will also show which countries (and hotspots in countries) have the most to gain in flood protection from reef conservation. We will wrap up by describing our work with the insurance industry and FEMA to show how valuation of risk reduction benefits can be used to finance reef and wetland conservation and restoration at scale. [Please note: This webinar significantly updates a May 2018 EBM Tools Network/OCTO webinar with new results and opportunities for implementation in policy and practice.]

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